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Themed Certificates & Credentials

Life/Ideas Themed Certificates

Ancients Alive: The Classics In Context

Dr. Shelley Wolbrink, Director

The Classics Certificate introduces students to the enduring impact of ancient Mediterranean civilizations, particularly Greece and Rome. In their myths, path-breaking political experiments, histories, inquisitive natures, and art and architecture, the ancients experimented with radical and transformational ways of understanding their world. The Classics remain deeply embedded in today’s culture and society; indeed, the Classics are infused in today’s languages, literature, politics, architecture, and popular culture. In the capstone, students collaborate with the Classics Everywhere Initiative, analyze film and popular culture, and curate material culture and/or produce urban plans for ancient Athens, Rome, or Pompeii. Students may choose to apply the Classics to their own majors and minors or integrate a study abroad experience into their final project. The study of ancient culture is sure to amaze, entertain, and provide a template for negotiating contemporary issues.

Required Courses (12 hrs.)

HIST 110: Ancient Civilizations
3 credit hours

This course provides an introduction to ancient civilizations from the earliest societies through the Byzantine Empire, approximately 700 CE. The class concentrates on the ancient civilizations of India, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome, while also examining the influence of other societies such as the Hebrews, the Phoenicians, the Minoans, and the Mycenaeans. influence of other societies such as the Hebrews, the Phoenicians, the Minoans, and the Mycenaeans. Emphasis placed on culture and society, texts, and surviving artifacts and monuments.

ENGL 212: Comparative Mythology
3 credit hours

A study of mythic literature in ancient, medieval and contemporary cultures, with close attention to the archetypal codes revealed in all mythologies, and universal narrative structures.

PHIL 300: Classical Philosophers
3 credit hours

An introduction to the prominent figures and doctrinal developments in the history of philosophy from the ancient Greek philosophers to Medieval philosophy. The course focuses on the primary texts of the pre-Socratics, the Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas, among others, examining their reflections on metaphysics, science and epistemology, as well as ethics and political philosophy.

HIST 300: Ancients Alive: The Classics and Culture
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: HIST 110, ENGL 212, PHIL 300. This seminar examines the Classics in historical and cultural contexts, and asks broader questions about the relationship of the Greeks and Romans to the modern world. Students will engage in a culminating experience that offers an opportunity to produce a written thesis, digital curation, work of art, or architectural project that engages the Greek or Roman era and/or its reiteration in other eras. This project may be fulfilled through study abroad opportunities in Rome, Aegina, or the home campus. There is no prerequisite for this class. Students of all majors are welcomed.

Different is the New Normal: Celebrating Neurodiversity

Dr. Laurie Edmondson, Director

Neurodiversity is about recognizing differences in people as human variation rather than disabilities. Many people experience some type of neurodiversity in their lives today. These differences may include Attention Deficit Disorder, Autistic Spectrum, Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, Anxiety Disorder, Depression and other neurological disorders. This certificate aims to help students understand how to acknowledge and appreciate these differences. The goal is to understand neurodiversity and mental health issues and to create future workplaces that are inclusive and supportive of every human being.

Required Courses (12 hrs.) 

PSYC 312: Positive Psychology
3 credit hours

Positive Psychology seeks to understand optimal human behavior. It emphasizes a scientific approach to knowing, guiding, healing, educating and helping people to flourish.

EDUC 225: Neurodiversity in Society and Why it Matters
3 credit hours

This course will explore the many types of neurodiversity and how each is a natural form of cognitive functioning. Included will be many examples of types of diversity and ways to incorporate all differences in a successful life.

PHIL 337: Challenging Normality
3 credit hours

This course is divided into three parts; the first is critical, the second is constructive, and the third is application. In the first part, the course focuses on thinkers like Michel Foucault, a 20th century French post-structuralist who argues that ways of labeling people as “abnormal” or “disabled” or “insane” are actually reflections of the desires of contingent structures of power at any given historical-cultural moment, and not reflections of the desires of contingent structures of power at any given historical-cultural moment, and not reflections of truth or knowledge about the human condition, human nature, or any other objective definition of medical normality. Spring boarding from that first critical part, the second part is constructive, and engages with literature that take up where Foucault’s deconstructive enterprise leaves off, focusing on new ways to approach intellectual (dis)ability that reinterpret such states independent of the desires of power, and in doing so open up the potential to see these states as a part of the panorama of normal human functioning. The third and last part of the course would focus on application, turning to specific ethical questions and debate over the status of dignity, justice, and personhood that emerge from the challenges raised by intellectual (dis)ability.

EDUC 322: Capstone Project in Neurodiversity
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PSYC 312, EDUC 225, PHIL 337. Mental health issues are common among residents of the United States. This course aims to identify common mental health issues and suggest healthy ways of working through these issues for better communication and interpersonal relationships in life and society. In this course, students will use what they know about Neurodiversity to complete a project that will help society be more aware of the issues and help people live a better life.

Ethical Leadership

Dr. Ted Vaggalis & Dr. Chris Panza, Co-Directors 

The certificate in Ethical Leadership provides students with a highly focused and robust understanding of the central components of ethics as they are expressed in philosophical theory, enriched by literature, broadened by religion, and complicated by perspectives from non-Western cultures. Students will work to bring together the understanding gained from the certificate courses and apply it in the capstone applied ethics course. In the capstone course students will engage in a sustained study of one ethical issue (topics will rotate year to year), in addition each student will develop, in conjunction with a faculty sponsor, a sustained research project on an important ethical problem of the student’s own choosing. All students are required to jointly present their research in a public symposium at the conclusion of the year.

Required Courses (12 hrs.)

PHIL 310: Asian Ethics
3 credit hours

In this course, students will be expected to confront, reflect on, and critically think through the central ethical traditions as offered by the West and then work to see if these traditions find analogues in the Eastern Asian tradition. Specifically, this course will require a close examination of western ethical theories and then a close reading and examination of the central texts of Confucianism, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Taoism.

ENGL 345: Literature and Ethics
3 credit hours

It is recommended that students have completed ENGL 200 in order to be successful in this course. Students will read literary texts to better understand the nature of ethical issues, the limits of various ethical models, and how literature can help us develop capacities to make wise ethical decisions.

RELG 309: Christian Ethics
3 credit hours

This course explores the biblical resources for Christian moral decision-making, examines the historical development of moral theology (from the early church through the twentieth century) and addresses selected moral issues.

FUSE 389: Seminar in Professional Ethics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PHIL 310, ENGL 345, RELG 309. This course is the capstone to the Ethics Themed Certificate. It is designed to provide students with an opportunity to tie together their experiences in the courses for the Certificate, demonstrating their proficiency in this subject-matter. The content of the course will rotate, depending on the instructor. But the content will be in an applied area of Ethics. In addition, students will do a research project in the professional field of their choice. The course will conclude with the students doing a poster session, where the students will explain their projects to faculty and students.

Food, Culture, and Society 

Dr. Elizabeth Paddock, Director

We all know the saying “we are what we eat,” but how many of us critically evaluate the complex ways that food intersects with our lives as individuals and societies? What are the ethical considerations in food consumption? What are the causes of hunger and malnourishment in the US and around the world? How do different societies understand their relationship to food, and how does this change across time? How is food connected to cultural and political identity? What are pressing public policy issues related to food? The certificate in Food, Culture, and Society is designed to address these and other important questions, developing a rich, multidisciplinary understanding of the centrality of food to the human experience.

Required Courses (12 hrs.) 

ANML 212: Animal Ethics
3 credit hours

This cutting-edge multidisciplinary course is designed to acquaint the student with contemporary and historical animal-ethics/rights issues. A primary goal of the course is to raise moral consciousness about the most current conditions and uses of nonhuman animals and therein the ethical dimension of relationships between nonhuman animals and human beings. The course is structured in two sections: a) ethical theory and b) applied ethics.

HIST 212: Food, Culture and Identity in Asia
3 credit hours

Food is a powerful cultural symbol that connects individuals and the community. This course examines the relationship between food and the history of agricultural practices, religion, social structure, rituals, family dynamics and state policies in Asia, particularly China, Japan, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

SOCI 202: Global Social Problems
3 credit hours

This course applies the sociological perspective to an examination of major global social problems, such as race and ethnic conflict, war, public health, poverty, population, and environmental issues. This includes a focus on how famine and endemic hunger are socially defined; the global political, economic, and cultural context in which each emerge; and how this context shapes responses to the problems in different countries where they exist.

PLSC 356: The Politics of Food
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ANML 212, HIST 212, SOCI 202 or declared Political Science major or minor. The course introduces students to food studies and politics. The course looks at food as the center of identity, language, and culture in a cross-national comparison of food consumption and food politics. The first third of the semester is devoted to food and identity in an international perspective. The second third of the semester is spent looking at food identity and politics in the United States. The last part of the semester examines specific food issues, including marketing strategies; the coexistence of binary medical issues such as anorexia and the obesity epidemic; and the effects of genetic engineering on food and consumption.

Get Out, Plug In: Intercultural Connections

Dr. Elizabeth Nichols, Director

The certificate in Get Out, Plug In: Intercultural Connections develops foundation skills in speaking a foreign language and understanding cultural diversity. Students will begin their language and cultural studies by taking an interdisciplinary course that covers education, political science, business, pre-law in diverse international contexts. Students will complete the certificate with a study abroad experience that prepares them for an official, externally administered Oral Proficiency Interview. Upon successful completion of the interview, students will be certified at the level of “Intermediate Mid” – the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages’’ recommended minimum level of foreign language skill in the workplace.

Required Courses (12 hrs.) 

XXX 102: Any foreign language course at the 102 level (3 hrs.)
XXX 201: Any foreign language course at the 200 level (3 hrs.)

FUSE 201: Introduction to International Diversity and Culture
3 credit hours

In this course, a taught by a variety of faculty from various disciplines across campus and form the community, students will analyze complex issues of diversity from the perspective of various fields. Covering such topics as gender, sexuality, ability, ethnicity, socioeconomic status and religion, student will use viewpoints from legal, business, ethical, political, educational and other disciplines to explore contemporary questions and develop valuable competencies.

LLIT 115: OPI Test in Foreign Language
0 credit hours

This is a placeholder course that exists to confirm students’ successful OPI rating in the appropriate language at the level of “intermediate mid” or higher. This course is graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

FUSE 401: Intercultural Communication Project
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: FUSE 201. During an approved Study Abroad experience, students will use foreign language as a tool to research and address problems in a cultural context or contexts. This study abroad experience must be completed in a country other than the United States or the student’s home country (if not the U.S.). Students will complete a hands-on project that is co-supervised by a foreign language professor and a faculty member from the professional department. This project will deepen the student’s learning about the intersection of language and culture, preparing them for leadership in multicultural organizations and societies. In addition, students must demonstrate foreign language ability at the ACTFL Intermediate-Mid level.

Graphic Storytelling

Jo Van Arkel, Director

The certificate in Graphic Storytelling develops foundation skills in creative process, sequential thinking, visual narrative and graphic design as it relates to the practice of illustrated storytelling. Students will enhance skills in drawing, storyboarding, and shaping narrative structure with an understanding of the history of visual narrative as an opportunity for creative expression, informational and technical writing related to professional fields and/or social commentary. Upon successful completion of the first three courses, students will create a capstone comic or visual narrative publication.

ARTZ 123: Drawing
3 credit hours

Students will work in a variety of drawing media and techniques solving representational problems. This course includes an introduction to figure drawing.

ENGL 200: Literature Matters
3 credit hours

One of three foundational courses for majors and potential majors in English, Literature Matters introduces students to a central set of problems in contemporary literary studies (for example, Identity and Empire, Shakespeare to Ondaatje). The course includes important canonical works as well as neglected or emerging writers. There is a focus on how to read and understand literature; how reading and writing literature influence identity, meaning and value; and how to develop strategies for reading, discussing, and writing about literary works. Attention is also given to narrative structure. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course in the spring semester of their freshman or sophomore year. Offered spring semester. May be repeated when topics vary.

ARTZ 210: Graphic Design I
3 credit hours

This course familiarizes students with the foundations skills of graphic design from sketch through comprehensive design. It introduces vocabulary, research, typography, design process, and exploration of design elements and principles through visual design problem solving. Students will develop presentation skill and familiarity of professional tools and techniques. This course will introduce the student to industry standard software applications and critical analysis of design work through written and verbal presentations.. Studio fee required.

ENGL 355: Small Press Publishing
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ARTZ 123, ENGL 200, ARTZ 210. This course provides an opportunity to explore book binding, book structures, limited-edition runs and writing for small?press publishing.

Holistic Health and Well-Being

Dr. Vickie Luttrell, Director

The certificate in Holistic Health and Well-Being provides students with a set of skills to help them live a better life. The certificate introduces holistic health practices and explores the ways in which social factors such as race, class, gender, and physical environment affect individual and community wellness. Students also investigate the ways in which technology has both enriched and impaired their lives. In the capstone, students implement a holistic self-intervention strategy to promote a healthier lifestyle and design a community-focused health intervention to improve the lives of others.

Required Courses (12 hrs.)

BIOL 271: Pathogens, Plagues, and Human Progress?
3 credit hours

In this course, students will examine the arc of human health and illness from ancient times when pathogens ruled, and plagues ensued, to our contemporary world in which illness can be the result of exposure to environmental toxins, lifestyle choices, and the disequilibrium associated with a totally wired modern life.

PSYC 372: Holistic Health Practices
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: BIOL 271. This participation-focused course introduces students to the history and practice of complementary healing therapies. Presentations and demonstrations by practitioners in such areas as herbal medicine, acupuncture, mediation, massage therapy, aromatherapy, animal-assisted therapy, music therapy, and yoga are an integral part of the course. The relationship of holistic health practices to both mainstream Western medicine and the emerging field of positive psychology are also explored.

SOCI 373: Sociology of Health, Illness, and Health Care
3 credit hours

This course examines the social determinants and consequences of health, illness, and health care. Major areas of investigation include the subjective experience of health and illness; the role of political, economic, cultural, and environmental factors in fostering ill health and health disparities; societal forces which shape and constrain healthcare delivery systems, personnel, and an individuals’ responses to illness; and the role of social movements in social changes in health, illness, and health care.

PSYC 374: Health Behavior Interventions
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: BIOL 271, PSYC 372, and SOCI 373. In this course, student will identify and implement a holistic self-intervention strategy to promote a healthier lifestyle and enhance their own well-being. Students will also engage with community partners, faculty, and students from other disciplines in the creation and evaluation of an intervention that addresses a local community health issue.

International Immersion

Dr. Robert Weddle, Director

International study has a unique ability to provide immersive learning experiences that heighten students’ knowledge of and sensitivity to other cultures. Drury faculty offer a broad range of international experiences, from short-term summer or winter programs to full-semester opportunities. Some of these programs qualify students for the International Immersion Certificate, which recognizes the integrative experiences of students who study abroad in significant and focused ways.

The courses in this certificate will vary depending on the specific study-abroad program. A list of approved and currently scheduled programs (along with required courses for those programs) can be found on the Themed Certificates section of Drury’s website and at the International Programs Office.

Programs are approved by the faculty’s Academic Affairs Committee, and must contain the following components, including a minimum of 6 hours of coursework taken at the study-abroad location:

Understanding Place (6 hrs.)
Two courses taken at the study-abroad location, covering issues relevant to the location of the study-abroad experience and emphasizing acquisition of intercultural understanding and analysis.

Interdisciplinary Contexts (3 hrs.)
One course determined by the study-abroad program organizer(s), taken either abroad or on campus, and providing context, depth, and interdisciplinary perspectives and approaches relevant to the study-abroad experience.

Place-Based Project (3 hrs.)
One course taken either abroad or on campus, providing an integrative capstone to the study-abroad experience through a project-based application of ideas and skills, to specific place-based problems, challenges, or issues.

Approved Programs:
Drury Center in Greece Semester Program: 

FUSE 320: Travel Journal
3 credit hours

In this internationally based course, specific study-abroad locations will be examined through disciplined observation, recording, and analysis of the diversity of practices, customs, histories, spatial organizations, and artistic production apparent in the particular study-abroad location. Students will employ written, graphic, and/or artistic methods appropriate to their major field(s) of study in order to observe and present responds to a given location and culture.

FUSE 350: Culture and Place
3 credit hours

In this internationally based course, students will develop foundational knowledge and understanding of how specific study-abroad locations are shaped by significant social, cultural, and historical forces and events. Particular emphasis will be given to examining how contemporary place-based qualities connect to broader historical contexts and cultural customs.

GREE 101: Elementary Greek I
3 credit hours

For beginners. Designed to develop, with GREE 102, an elementary proficiency for communicating in Greek and to intensify familiarity with the cultural values of Greek peoples. Offered spring semester in preparation for second semester of study in Greece.

FUSE 370: International Immersion Capstone
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: FUSE 320 and FUSE 350. This course will allow students to engage their study-abroad experience and coursework to respond to focused issues relevant to the study-abroad location and culture. Students will devise project-based responses expressed through written and/or creative projects.

Life in Close-Up: Film, History and Society

Dr. Kevin Henderson, Director

The certificate in Film, History and Society will introduce students to the study of film, with an emphasis on how film reflects, distorts and challenges our ideas of historical eras, gender identities and political events. Students will learn how to read films in order to question how film represents and misrepresents the “true stories” of historical figures, cultural ideas, and our sense of what really happened. Across four connected courses, students will develop skills in writing, visual literacy, textural analysis of film, and questioning the sources of historical knowledge. In the capstone course, students will have the option of pursuing either a critical or creative final project, which will be presented on campus or in coordination with The Moxie Cinema in downtown Springfield. 

Required Courses (12 hrs.) 

ENGL 235: The History of Film
3 credit hours

A survey of major international and American film accomplishments beginning with Griffith and Chaplin and continuing through contemporary directors such as Bergman, Fellini and Allen. Some attention will be given to film technique, theory and analysis.

HIST 213: China: Film and History
3 credit hours

This course examines major themes and changes in Chinese history through films and texts. Some of the themes include modernization, political and economic transformation, the Cultural Revolution, and globalization.

HIST 322: Joan of Arc: Film and History
3 credit hours

Through an examination of trial records and documents, this course examines the life of the peasant Joan of Arc, one of the most popular figures in history. Additional focus on the context of the Middle Ages as well as myth-making and representations in literature, art, film and propaganda. In what ways are historical interpretations shaped by popular culture and cultural biases about the past? How has Joan remained an important cultural construction long after her death?

PLSC 321: Music, Film and Politics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ENGL 235, HIST 213HIST 322 or declared Political Science major or minor. Music, television, and film can have an effect on politics and political life. This course critically examines these effects by exploring such topics as civil rights, memory, war, and social movements through the lens of popular culture and creative expression.


Profession/Skills Themed Certificates

Data Analytics: Big Problems, Big Data Solutions

Dr. James Simmerman, Director

Our world has many problems in every field imaginable that require data analysis to develop solutions. The rapid growth in technology has led to enormous amounts of data available. Journalism, sociology, marketing, biology – name the field and there is an opportunity to use data to inform the users of trends and relationships that could help the world solve big problems.

Required Courses (12 hrs.) 

MGMT 263: Introduction to Data Analytics
3 credit hours

Provides with the base level understand and quantitative foundation needed for data analytics. It will include a discussion of key topics such as big data, analytics (including predictive/prescriptive), machine learning, Internet of Things, data mining and data science. The course will begin by examining these key topics, then move into an in-depth focus on the analytical process. Using case studies and application to real world scenarios students will experience how to apply the data analytics process to business situations. Next, the course will focus on data communications and visualization principles. Finally, students will be introduced to common data analytics software applications and use one, or more, of these applications to complete an end of term project.

MGMT 363: Data Analytics Applications
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MGMT 263. Using a problem-driven approach, this course will lead to the acquisition of new, appropriate data analytics skills, set in an ethical context that carefully considers the implications of interpretation and display of results. Using a mix of open source data from various disciplines and tools and software available to us through academic partnerships with various providers, students will begin to think about problems from their fields on interest for their capstone “live” project.

COMM 270: Introduction to Data Visualization
3 credit hours

This course is designed to teach students critical skills for evaluating data usage and visualization, and introduce them to ways to analyze and present their own data sets. The goal is to develop the ability to review data visualizations critically and determine their usefulness and validity.

MGMT 463: Big Data Capstone Project
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: MGMT 263, MGMT 363, and COMM 270. This course will allow the student to develop a problem to solve in their primary major field of study. Because of Drury’s relationships with alumni and the community at large, the student will work with live data from organizations and companies. The student will be assigned an advisory team consisting of a Drury faculty member from their field and two representatives from the organization or company. The organization or company will have a problem identified. The student will have to refine the problem to be able to craft the research plan. Students produce a research plan including, 1) proper definition of the problem, 2) evaluation of the ethical considerations of the issue, 3) relevant data to be acquired, and 4) example methodologies to properly analyze the data. The plan will be approved by the course professor and the advisory team. The student will work with the client to obtain the data and will work on the analysis in a laboratory setting with the course professor. The project will require the components as in the previous courses, but will have the addition of multiple visual representations of the results AND a presentation to leaders of the client organization.

Designing Solutions for Environmental Problems

Dr. Justin Leinaweaver, Director

The long-term success of any society is inextricably linked to its ability to maintain the health of its environment. Environmental problems arise as unintended side-effects of consumers seeking to provide for themselves, business owners seeking to earn profits, and government representatives seeking to stay in power. Therefore, solving environmental problems can only be successful over time if policies are carefully designed to ensure the sustainability of the resource and the community that depends on it in equal measure. This certificate aims to provide students with the skills necessary to understand and address complex environmental problems in this way.

BIOL 163: Science of the Environment
3 credit hours

This course affords an opportunity to investigate environmental issues from a scientific perspective. Processes of the scientific method and information/data from the primary literature will be used to discuss modern environmental problems. Students will analyze modern environmental issues from this scientific perspective to discover relevant variable, trends in the data, and possible solutions to the issues.

ECON 225: Introduction to Environmental Economics
3 credit hours

Economic principles are used to analyze contemporary environmental issues. The impacts of population and economic growth on natural resource depletion are explored.

PHIL 320: Environmental Ethics
3 credit hours

This course seeks to develop a better understanding of both the factual and ethical dimensions of our current and possible future environments. Explores several contemporary approaches in environmental ethics (including deep ecology, ecofeminism, animal rights, market efficiencies, the loss of biodiversity and responses from deontological, utilitarian and virtue ethics, etc.) and representative theoretical problems (e.g., Aldo Leopold’s “land ethic” vs. natural rights views, ecological holism vs. moral atomism, market efficiency vs. moral obligations, etc.). Using a case-study approach, students then learn to apply different ethical frameworks to several ethical choices occasioned by human interaction with the natural order.

Interactive Design

Dr. Chris Branton, Director

This certificate develops skills in design and development with emphasis on current and future trends. The skills will translate to professional roles in interaction design, visual design, software development and product design.

Required Courses (12 hrs.)

CSCI 152: Fundamentals of Programming
3 credit hours

An introduction to problem solving with computers. Students investigate and implement solutions to a range of problems, with a concentration on multimedia and interactive applications. Suitable for non-majors who want to learn about computers and programming.

ARTZ 314: Interactive Design and Aesthetics
3 credit hours

This course will dive deep into design, color theory and visual literacy from an interactive perspective. Students will explore the relationships between visual design, contemporary design process, user research and front-end development in order to create an appealing interactive experience. Students will learn to prototype, test and design an interactive experience which will prepare them to utilize these techniques in a variety of traditional and contemporary user interface designs.

CSCI 322: Human Computer Interface Design and Technology
3 credit hours

From cell phones to supercomputers, smart speakers to autonomous automobiles, there are now many more computers than human upon the earth. Human-computer interfaces provide the bridges across which humans engage with the digital realm. This course provides both an overview and hands-on experience with the design, techniques, and technology underlying such interfaces, placing equal weight on concepts and projects. Students will complete programming and design projects employing both traditional graphical interfaces; distributed GUIs (e.g., tablets, smartphones combined with LCD displays); virtual and augmented reality (e.g., Oculus Rift); and hands-on electronics. Students will develop projects involving Java, Python, JavaScript/HTML5, C++, and/or C#, with much freedom given to student teams. Some prior programming experience in at least one of these languages is recommended.

CSCI 395: Applied Projects
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ARTZ 314, CSCI 152 and CSCI 322. For Computer Science majors and minors, CSCI 261 and CSCI 277. A project-based course in software development. Students will work as members of software development teams. The projects will be conducted following a software development methodology.

Justice Denied: Wrongful Convictions

Dr. Jennie Long, Director

One of the greatest tragedies in the criminal justice system is the conviction of a person for a crime he or she did not commit. The themed certificate in Wrongful Convictions will provide the opportunity for students to gain an in-depth understanding of the legal process used to process criminal cases, evaluate the ways in which ethics and social justice issues impact conviction rates, and critically analyze real-life examples of wrongful conviction, as well as state and federal post-conviction remedies.

Required Courses (12 hrs.)

CRIM 102: Introduction to Criminology
3 credit hours

A survey course designed to provide a general theoretical understanding of crime problems in the United States. The basic sources of crime, the justice machinery and society’s reaction to crime are examined.

PHIL 214: Free Will & Responsibility
3 credit hours

No question in the history of philosophy has been debated for a longer period of time than the free will problem. Are we merely dominoes falling in accordance with fate, history, causation, genetics, or socialization; or are we the “final arbiters of our own wills”? The question of human freedom goes right to the center of the meaningfulness of our very existences - after all, if we are not free, what is the point of making decisions, formulating life plans and striving for goals? Throughout this course we will survey all of the major “camps” in the free will debate. Along the way you will learn that each camp, in providing its own answer to the debate, also reveals further and perhaps more disturbing problems and issues.

FUSE 300: Constitutional Criminal Law and Procedure
3 credit hours

This course will introduce the student to federal and state legal systems and the sources of law. Students will study the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Fourteenth Amendments of the United States Constitution. The course will also focus on the constitutional restraints on the activities of law enforcement officers during the investigatory stage of the criminal process. Special attention will be paid to how the Supreme Court has attempted to resolve the tension between individual rights and crime control needs in its decisions regulating the following law enforcement practices: investigative detention, arrest, police interrogation, searches and seizures, and eyewitness identification. The rights to effective assistance of counsel and to a jury will also be covered.

CRIM 345: Cases of Innocence in the Criminal Justice System
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CRIM 102, PHIL 214, FUSE 300. This course will examine the injustices that occur in the criminal justice system when innocent persons are convicted of crimes. The errors that may arise during case processing, including false confessions, the use of faulty scientific evidence, eyewitness misidentifications, and prosecutorial misconduct will be examined. The course will also focus on particular cases of wrongful conviction and the identification of remedies to address such miscarriages of justice.

Learning to Lead and Leading to Learn: Facilitating Learning in the Professional Setting

Dr. Lori Slater, Director

This certificate will prepare students to be the developers and providers of the organizational training employers are looking for in today’s work environment. Completers of this certificate will understand the importance of ongoing professional learning within any profession and how being a facilitator that can lead the learning and development of others can set them apart from their colleagues. Students will learn facilitation techniques for delivering training and workshops, how to be a work-place mentor, how to lead process changes, and how to develop employee soft skills in the workplace.

Required Courses (12 hrs.)

EDUC 216: Fundamentals of Adult Learning Theory
3 credit hours

This course introduces students to the practice of teaching and educating adults as they begin to think of themselves as the facilitator of learning. This will include identifying how the adult learns best in the professional setting, how their experiences affect their learning preferences, and how to engage the adult learner with the content.

MGMT 204: Organizational Behavior
3 credit hours

This course introduces students to theories and models of human behavior in organizations with an emphasis on the individual level processes. Topics covered include individual and situational explanations for behavior, communication, decision-making, motivation, leadership, and teams. Workplace and managerial applications are considered.

COMM 211: Presentational Speaking
3 credit hours

Principles and practice of effective oral communication. This course focuses on researching, composing and delivering formal and informal presentations. Topics include ethics and public speaking, listening, research, analyzing and adapting to audiences, message construction, outlining, delivery of message, effective use of visual aids and critically evaluating public address. The course emphasizes informative and persuasive speaking. Designed for students who seek speaking and critical thinking skills.

EDUC 321: Professional Training Skills in Action
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: EDUC 216, MGMT 204, COMM 211. This course will give students the opportunity to demonstrate the skills learned through the certificate coursework in a capstone project where they will design and deliver a professional learning experience, in a community or professional setting related to their major. S/U Grading.

Professional and Visual Communication

Dr. Matt Noblett, Director

A certificate that develops professional presentation skills, utilization of visual design tools and basic communication and design philosophy. This will prepare the student for professional, design and communications-oriented leadership and support roles. Students will explore standard professional guidelines, brand identity and variety of techniques to engage and persuade audiences.

Required Courses (12 hrs.)

ARTZ 210: Graphic Design I
3 credit hours

This course familiarizes students with the foundations skills of graphic design from sketch through comprehensive design. It introduces vocabulary, research, typography, design process, and exploration of design elements and principles through visual design problem solving. Students will develop presentation skill and familiarity of professional tools and techniques. This course will introduce the student to industry standard software applications and critical analysis of design work through written and verbal presentations.. Studio fee required.

COMM 211: Presentational Speaking
3 credit hours

Principles and practice of effective oral communication. This course focuses on researching, composing and delivering formal and informal presentations. Topics include ethics and public speaking, listening, research, analyzing and adapting to audiences, message construction, outlining, delivery of message, effective use of visual aids and critically evaluating public address. The course emphasizes informative and persuasive speaking. Designed for students who seek speaking and critical thinking skills.

COMM 231: Integrated Brand Management
3 credit hours

This course will highlight the changes taking place in the world of integrated marketing communications – the process of communicating to promote products, services, and ideas. No longer is it just print or broadcast images connecting with audiences; skilled marketers must understand the importance of social media and the power of the audience. COMM 231 will introduce you to the communication tools, techniques, and media that practitioners use to design strategies to connect with audiences.

ARTZ 322: Professional & Visual Communication Capstone
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ARTZ 210, COMM 211, COMM 231. This course continues the development of practical presentation technical skills and incorporates a capstone research and final presentation component. This will include tools and techniques for digital and traditional presentations and strategies for engagement through a variety of technologies and tools. The capstone course will put emphasis on messaging, graphics, delivery of presentation materials and use of visual techniques to engage an audience. The final presentation may include local non-profit organizations/businesses in a final research and presentation project. This project will include development of presentation material, scripts/outlines, dry run/rehearsals and delivery utilizing industry standard tools and methods.

Sports Leadership: Going Beyond the Game

Dr. Jonathan Groves, Director

The Sports Leadership certificate introduces students interested in coaching or leadership positions to key ideas in communication, management, and sociology. The coursework will provide a foundation for understanding how teams interact, evolve, and thrive.

Required Courses (12 hrs.)

COMM 230: Sports Communication
3 credit hours

This course provides an introduction to communication within sports contexts. Students explore the evolution and likely future of sports communication strategies and messages, along with how this communication is important within society. This includes examinations of communicating as media practitioners within sports contexts, as well as the culture of sport.

COMM 285: Communication and Ethics
3 credit hours

Introduction to ethics in communication studies. Students examine conceptual perspectives for understanding and evaluating communication ethics in interpersonal relationships, small groups, organizations and intercultural contexts. This course is designed to stimulate the moral imagination, reveal ethical issues inherent in communication and provide resources for making and defending choices on ethical grounds.

SOCI 280: Sociology of Sport
3 credit hours

This course introduces students to critical individual, socio- cultural, and institutional dynamics of sport, including how social statuses (e.g., race, class, gender, and sexual orientation) frame experiences within sport and how other social structurers (e.g., culture, family, education, politics, and economy) intersect with sport. Special emphasis will be given to the inequalities, commodification, and consumption of sport.

FUSE 380: Sports Leadership Internship
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: COMM 230, COMM 285, SOCI 280. Internships are designed to help students better understand the connection between theoretical perspectives and practices in the workplace. Before registering, students are required to meet with the behavioral sciences internship director to learn more about expectations, requirements, and responsibilities. Students must have junior or senior status and a GPA of 2.50 or better to be eligible for internships.