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Your Drury Fusion Curriculum

Your Drury Fusion is a common experience for all students. It has been carefully designed to equip students for life and profession through a blend of academic credentials.

  • Each student completes at least three credentials: one major and two certificates (or one major and one certificate plus a second major or a minor).
  • Of the three credentials, at least one must be in the “Life” category and one must be in the “Profession” category.

Your Drury Fusion integrates theoretical learning with real-world projects and problems in order to empower students to develop intellectually and gain marketable competencies. Your Drury Fusion is structured to provide the knowledge, perspectives, and skills associated with a liberal arts and sciences education.

Your Drury Fusion has three components: first-year seminar courses, Exploration requirements, and certificates.

First-Year Seminar Courses

Frontiers: Frontiers is the gateway course to Your Drury Fusion. It introduces students to academic work at the collegiate level and fosters their discovery within a community of the many educational pathways available to them at Drury. Each course section has its own theme, developed by faculty members from a wide variety of disciplines. The emphasis is on developing skills in writing, critical thinking, and information literacy.

Intersections: Intersections continues the process of intellectual discovery begun in Frontiers. Topic-based sections are co-taught by faculty from different disciplines who introduce students to their different disciplinary approaches. Students will refine their ability to address issues and problems by developing novel strategies for analysis and understanding. The emphasis is on collaborative, student-led assignments.

Drury Explorations

Drury Exploration categories support a broad education by allowing students to explore the world through seven broad, compelling liberal arts and sciences areas: Creative Explorations, Ethical Explorations, Exploring Communities and Civic Engagement, Exploring Global Cultures, Exploring the Natural World, Exploring Self and Others, and Exploring Narratives and Texts. These courses may overlap with majors, minors, and certificates, because of this experience.

Certificates

A certificate is a widely-recognized credential that is distinct from both majors and minors. It emphasizes depth in multiple disciplines. Certificates will allow students a measure of freedom to design their curriculum consistent with their interests and goals, and will provide a meaningful framework for problem-based, hands-on experiences.

More About Certificates


Curriculum

First Year Seminar Courses (6 hrs.)

FUSE 101: Frontiers
3 credit hours

Frontiers is the gateway course to Drury’s general education curriculum. It introduces students to academic work at the collegiate level and fosters their discovery within a community of the many educational pathways available to them at Drury. Each course section has its own theme, developed by faculty members from a wide variety of disciplines. Particular emphasis lies on developing students’ skills in writing, critical thinking and information literacy.

FUSE 102: Intersections
3 credit hours

Intersections continues the process of intellectual discover begun in Frontiers by focusing students’ attention on the problem-solving methods and epistemologies used by selected disciplines to address complex contemporary issues. Topic-based sections are co-taught by faculty who introduce students to their respective disciplinary or epistemological approaches. Students will refine their ability to problem-solve by approaching today’s most pressing problems from multiple perspectives and by developing new strategies for analysis, understanding, and reflection on their own process of gathering knowledge. Emphasis is on collaborative, student-led assignments and work.

Drury Explorations (21 - 22 hrs.) 

Select one course from each of the following categories: 

Category 1: Creative Explorations 

ARTZ 123: Drawing
3 credit hours

Students will work in a variety of drawing media and techniques solving representational problems. This course includes an introduction to figure drawing.

ARTZ 210: Graphic Design I
3 credit hours

This course familiarizes students with the foundations skills of graphic design from sketch through comprehensive design. It introduces vocabulary, research, typography, design process, and exploration of design elements and principles through visual design problem solving. Students will develop presentation skill and familiarity of professional tools and techniques. This course will introduce the student to industry standard software applications and critical analysis of design work through written and verbal presentations.. Studio fee required.

ARTZ 230: Painting I
3 credit hours

This course will cover the studio experience and demonstration in observation-based painting. Problems are assigned as a means of allowing students to come to terms with the technical aspects of painting through actual involvement with the painting process.

ARTZ 250: Sculpture I
3 credit hours

This course is an introduction to sculpture. In the studio the student will explore various approaches to contemporary and traditional sculptural problems by working with a variety of media. This course focuses on developing the technical skills and aesthetics considerations as they relate to various materials and processes used in sculpture. Course fee required.

ARTZ 260: Photography I
3 credit hours

This course covers basic principles of photography, both digital and analog. Students will learn manual camera operation as well as darkroom printing techniques and basic Photoshop skills within a historical and cultural context of the medium. Students will be introduced to critical analysis of art works through written and verbal presentations. Both a DSLR and SLR 35mm camera with shutter and aperture control are required for this course. Cameras are available to rent throughout the semester. Course fee required.

COMM 211: Presentational Speaking
3 credit hours

Principles and practice of effective oral communication. This course focuses on researching, composing and delivering formal and informal presentations. Topics include ethics and public speaking, listening, research, analyzing and adapting to audiences, message construction, outlining, delivery of message, effective use of visual aids and critically evaluating public address. The course emphasizes informative and persuasive speaking. Designed for students who seek speaking and critical thinking skills.

ENGL 266: Creative Writing I - Fiction
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: DAY-None. CCPS-ENGL 150. Students learn techniques for and practice in writing fiction. The course focuses on student workshops.

ENGL 267: Creative Writing I - Poetry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: DAY-None. CCPS-ENGL 150. Students learn techniques for and practice in writing poetry.

ENGL 268: Creative Writing I - Nonfiction
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: DAY-None. CCPS-ENGL 150. Students learn techniques for and practice writing nonfiction.

MUSC 115: Introduction to Music
3 credit hours

This is an introductory course in the music of western culture for non-music majors, designed to help students listen to music in greater depth and to acquire a basic knowledge of the musician’s technique and vocabulary. Although the material emphasized in the course will be western art music, the listening and evaluation skills developed during the course can be applied to any musical genre.

MUSC 116: History of American Pop Music
3 credit hours

This course examines the historical significance of popular music in the United States from the mid-19th century to the present. We will focus on the musical, cultural, social, political, and economic dimensions ("the context") of genres ranging from the Minstrel Show and Tin Pan Alley to blues, jazz, swing, country, folk, soul, rock, disco, and hip-hop.

MUSC 224: Jazz History
3 credit hours

This course is a survey of the history of jazz from its origins as African- American slave music to the present day. Topics will include musical trends, influential musicians and discussion of political, racial and social factors that have contributed to the development of the genre.

THTR 140: Acting I
3 credit hours

An introductory course to acting designed for majors and all students who wish to explore acting methodology. The course includes character development and expression. Practical exercises in both scripted and improvisational work will be stressed.

THTR 354: Writing for Stage and Screen
3 credit hours

Students study play and film structure, character creation and the art of writing dialogue. Course responsibilities include the writing of two short plays and/or films.

Category 2: Ethical Explorations

ANML 212: Animal Ethics
3 credit hours

This cutting-edge multidisciplinary course is designed to acquaint the student with contemporary and historical animal-ethics/rights issues. A primary goal of the course is to raise moral consciousness about the most current conditions and uses of nonhuman animals and therein the ethical dimension of relationships between nonhuman animals and human beings. The course is structured in two sections: a) ethical theory and b) applied ethics.

CRIM 341: Justice, Punishment and Ethics
3 credit hours

A philosophical and pragmatic examination of justice and punishment. The course will provide the student with an understanding of the conceptual foundations of justice.

ENGL 342: Shakespeare and Ethics
3 credit hours

Students read Shakespeare’s plays with a focus on the moral component of his drama. We ask how Shakespeare understood what it meant to live well, and how he understood good and evil and the problems of achieving moral clarity and moral maturity, in our personal and in our public lives.

ENGL 345: Literature and Ethics
3 credit hours

It is recommended that students have completed ENGL 200 in order to be successful in this course. Students will read literary texts to better understand the nature of ethical issues, the limits of various ethical models, and how literature can help us develop capacities to make wise ethical decisions.

PHIL 305: Ethical Issues in Health Care
3 credit hours

This course explores the ethical dilemmas confronting contemporary medicine. It both inquires into a broad range of topics (abortion, euthanasia, health-care costs, organ transplantation, etc.) and provides a thorough study of ethical theories that may be applied to address the dilemmas of modern medicine.

PHIL 310: Asian Ethics
3 credit hours

In this course, students will be expected to confront, reflect on, and critically think through the central ethical traditions as offered by the West and then work to see if these traditions find analogues in the Eastern Asian tradition. Specifically, this course will require a close examination of western ethical theories and then a close reading and examination of the central texts of Confucianism, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Taoism.

PHIL 316: Ethics
3 credit hours

Students will be expected to confront, reflect on, compare and contrast, apply, and critically think through, the central ethical traditions offered throughout human history— particularly virtue ethics, deontology, and consequentialism. The course begins with a discussion of critical questions relevant to the study of ethics, such as relativism, human nature, and free will, then turns to examining the main theories and ends with criticisms of ethics.

RELG 309: Christian Ethics
3 credit hours

This course explores the biblical resources for Christian moral decision-making, examines the historical development of moral theology (from the early church through the twentieth century) and addresses selected moral issues.

Category 3: Exploring Communities and Civic Engagement

HIST 101: United States History to 1865
3 credit hours

A broad survey of the major political and social developments from the time of Columbus to the Civil War. Offered fall semester.

HIST 102: United States History 1865 to Present
3 credit hours

A broad survey of the major political and social developments from the Civil War to the present. Offered spring semester.

MGMT 103: Business Foundations
3 credit hours

An introduction to the fundamental concepts and principles of business enterprise and economics. Introduction to the functions of a business organization. Basic research methods, written and oral reports, discussion of current business, and economic developments. Global business awareness.

PLSC 101: Government and Politics in the United States
3 credit hours

Introduction to the theories, constitutional bases, functions and government structures of the U.S. political system in relation to the global political environment. Emphasis on national politics and linkages with state, local and international governments, including an emphasis on Missouri and current issues in domestic and foreign policy.

PLSC 151: Introduction to Comparative Politics
3 credit hours

Introduction to the comparison of different political systems with an examination of liberal democratic societies, communist and post-communist systems, and developing nations with case studies from each category.

PLSC 152: Introduction to International Relations
3 credit hours

A study of the historical background and contemporary organization of the international political system and the world economy.

SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology
3 credit hours

An analysis of factors that are significant in the development of people as social beings. Consideration is given to the social group and culture as factors in this process.

Category 4: Exploring The Natural World

BIOL 160: Exploration and Discovery in Biology
3 credit hours

This course allows students majoring in a non-science field to learn about the processes of the biological sciences, including how science works, its limitations, and how science and society influence each other. Biological topics are variable but will be problem-based, communication intensive, and engage students with focused topics in science to show how science and society interact. This course does not apply to any major or minor in the natural sciences.

CHEM 160: Exploration/Discovery in Chemistry
3 credit hours

This course allows students majoring in a non-science field to learn about the processes of the chemical sciences, including how science works, its limitations, and how science and society influence each other. Chemistry topics are variable but will be problem-based, communication intensive and engage students with focused topics in science to show how science and society interact. This course does not apply to any major or minor in the natural sciences.

CSCI 152: Fundamentals of Programming
3 credit hours

An introduction to problem solving with computers. Students investigate and implement solutions to a range of problems, with a concentration on multimedia and interactive applications. Suitable for non-majors who want to learn about computers and programming.

CSCI 251: Introduction to Computer Science
4 credit hours

An introduction to computer science through applications such as media. A major component is programming design and development using a language such as Python or Java. A disciplined approach to problem solving methods and algorithm development will be stressed using top-down design and stepwise refinement. Topics included are syntax and semantics, input and output, control structures, modularity, data types, and object-oriented programming. Recommended for students with previous programming experience or a strong mathematical background (math ACT score of 24 or above).

MATH 205: Mathematical Connections
3 credit hours

It is strongly recommended that students have completed at least two years of high school algebra in order to be successful in this course. A quantitative reasoning course for students in the liberal arts, focusing on applications of mathematics to social issues in our world. Contains the study of providing urban services, making social choices, constructing fair voting systems, and planning the fair division of resources.

MATH 213: Trigonometry and Vectors with Applications
3 credit hours

 It is strongly recommended that students have completed two years of high school algebra in order to be successful in this course. This course will cover trigonometry and vectors with an emphasis on applications in architecture and mechanics. Logarithms, logarithmic scales, and their applications will also be covered. At least one-third of class time will be spent on group projects which apply the course material.

MATH 227: Introduction to Statistics
3 credit hours

 It is strongly recommended that students have completed one year of high school algebra in order to be successful in this course. A course to acquaint the student with the basic ideas and language of statistics including such topics such as descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, basic experimental design, elementary probability, binomial and normal distributions, estimation and test of hypotheses, and analysis of variance.

PHYS 160: Exploration/Discovery in Physics
3 credit hours

This course allows students majoring in a non- science field to learn about the processes of the chemical sciences, including how science works, its limitations, and how science and society influence each other. Physics topics are variable but will be problem-based, communication intensive and engage students with focused topics in science to show how science and society interact. This course does not apply to any major or minor in the natural sciences.

PHIL 277: Philosophy of Science
3 credit hours

Our world is embedded within a powerful narrative that sees science as the epistemic path towards understanding what reality is and how it behaves, providing science with a tremendous amount of authority and power in modern discourse (cultural, scientific, and interpersonal). Is this power and authority legitimate? In this course we will analyze science philosophically, questioning the assumptions underlying the scientific method, asking whether science is objective or value neutral, and asking whether science makes historical progress, or whether science can ever reveal anything to us about the true nature of reality itself.

Category 5: Exploring the Self and Others

CRIM 102: Introduction to Criminology
3 credit hours

A survey course designed to provide a general theoretical understanding of crime problems in the United States. The basic sources of crime, the justice machinery and society’s reaction to crime are examined.

EDUC 205: Diversity and Social Justice in Education
3 credit hours

This course focuses on issues of diversity, oppression and social justice. It is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to be knowledgeable of biases based on race, ethnicity, culture, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, social and economic status, political ideology, disability and how these contribute to discrimination and oppression. Students will learn about diverse cultures, family structures, roles, immigration and assimilation experiences of marginalized groups. Students will also learn about the influence of dominant culture on these diverse and marginalized groups. Additionally, this course will examine the adaptive capabilities and strengths of these marginalized groups and how such capabilities and strengths can be used in effective educational settings. The course will assist pre-service teachers in understanding the complex nature and dynamics of social oppression, diversity and social functioning. Students will explore their own personal beliefs, and behaviors that may limit their ability to effectively interact in educational settings with people of diverse backgrounds, in particular, disadvantaged and oppressed persons. Themes included justice, suffering, the role of the government, poverty, and society’s response to them. Initiatives and response of both secular and faith-based groups to injustices in the past (e.g. Civil Rights, abolitionism), will be examined.

EDUC 302: Educational Psychology and Assessment
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Behavioral science majors: PSYC 230; Education majors: EDUC 205 and EDUC 207. This course is designed to introduce different theories and principles of development, learning, motivation and assessment of student learning. The major emphasis in this course is on how to apply these principles in classroom practice in both typical and multicultural settings. Normally taken in the second semester of the sophomore or junior year.

ENGL 317: African-American Literature
3 credit hours

The backgrounds of African-American culture in African and Caribbean literatures, as well as the history of black American literature in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with focus on the contemporary scene.

FREN 230: French Beyond France: Cultural Identity in the Francophone World
3 credit hours

This course explores the essence of Francophone cultural identity around the world, from former colonies in Africa and North America to overseas territories in the Antilles and Pacific Islands.

HIST 350: African-American History
3 credit hours

A survey of nineteenth and twentieth century African- American history, with an emphasis on cultural, social, economic and political issues.

MTHP 200: Psychology of Music
3 credit hours

Introduction to the field of music psychology, overview of musical acoustics, music and emotion, and affective responses to music.

PSYC 101: Introduction to Psychology
3 credit hours

This is a survey course providing a study of the behavior of living organisms, particularly human behavior. Typical problems are methods and measurement in psychology, theoretical systems, learning, motivation, perception, personality and psychopathology.

Category 6: Exploring Narratives and Texts

ANML 207: Animals in Documentaries
3 credit hours

In this course, students explore the relationships between humans and animals through the lens of documentaries, films, and videos. These thought-provoking videos offer a unique entre?e into the animal rights debate, which is unquestionably one of the most important ethical issues and social justice movements of our day. Upon completion of the course, students will have increased their ability to analyze documentaries and films thoughtfully, think critically and imaginatively, and communicate ideas powerfully in writing and speaking about the animal rights debate.

ENGL 200: Literature Matters
3 credit hours

One of three foundational courses for majors and potential majors in English, Literature Matters introduces students to a central set of problems in contemporary literary studies (for example, Identity and Empire, Shakespeare to Ondaatje). The course includes important canonical works as well as neglected or emerging writers. There is a focus on how to read and understand literature; how reading and writing literature influence identity, meaning and value; and how to develop strategies for reading, discussing, and writing about literary works. Attention is also given to narrative structure. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course in the spring semester of their freshman or sophomore year. Offered spring semester. May be repeated when topics vary.

ENGL 212: Comparative Mythology
3 credit hours

A study of mythic literature in ancient, medieval and contemporary cultures, with close attention to the archetypal codes revealed in all mythologies, and universal narrative structures.

ENGL 235: The History of Film
3 credit hours

A survey of major international and American film accomplishments beginning with Griffith and Chaplin and continuing through contemporary directors such as Bergman, Fellini and Allen. Some attention will be given to film technique, theory and analysis.

FREN 330: Dangerous Liaisons: French Literature in Translation
3 credit hours

A survey of French and Francophone writers such as Chrétien de Troyes, Molière, Balzac, Flaubert, Camus, Sartre, Maryse Condé and an investigation of literary movements: courtly romance, classicism, the Enlightenment, realism, romanticism, symbolism, existentialism and postcolonial discourse. The course is conducted in English; no previous knowledge of French is necessary.

HIST 110: Ancient Civilizations
3 credit hours

This course provides an introduction to ancient civilizations from the earliest societies through the Byzantine Empire, approximately 700 CE. The class concentrates on the ancient civilizations of India, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome, while also examining the influence of other societies such as the Hebrews, the Phoenicians, the Minoans, and the Mycenaeans. influence of other societies such as the Hebrews, the Phoenicians, the Minoans, and the Mycenaeans. Emphasis placed on culture and society, texts, and surviving artifacts and monuments.

HIST 223: Medieval Europe
3 credit hours

This course provides an introduction to the Middle Ages, examining the multiple influences that shaped European history from the fourth to the fifteenth century. Particular emphasis placed on Christianity, the twelfth-century Renaissance, medieval cities, and society and culture.

MUSC 230: Jazz and Social Issues
3 credit hours

This course examines some of the prominent social issues that have presented themselves throughout jazz history, including copyright ethics, discrimination in jazz and the psychology of creativity. Student will examine these issues through readings in various disciplines. Students will also present these ideas and apply them to other similar issues in other disciplines through essays and class discussions.

PHIL 105: Introduction to Philosophy
3 credit hours

An introductory survey of a number of perennial philosophical questions such as “How can a physical body produce a mind?” “Does free will exist?” “What is the self?” “Can we know if God exists?” and “Is there really an external world?” Offered annually.

PHIL 205: Meaning of Life
3 credit hours

The meaning of life is a question that all people confront at some point in their lives. This course will take up this question, reading selections from the writings of great thinkers in both the Eastern and Western intellectual traditions, and using the tools of conceptual analysis and critique to assess the various answers that have been given to it. The following is a partial list of themes that will be covered during the course of a semester. The course seeks to provide students with an introduction to the fundamental issues at stake, along with the means for assessing these issues. The aim is to get students to reflect on their lives and what makes them meaningful, and then to articulate their own vision of a meaningful life.

PHIL 218: Thinking Like a Confucian
3 credit hours

In this course we will study the ancient pre-Qin Confucian ethical tradition, concentrating first on the classic Four Books -Confucius’ Analects, the Mengzi, the Daxue (the ‘Great Learning’) and the Zhongyong (the ‘Doctrine of the Mean’) and then moving to the last pre-Qin Confucian work, the Xunzi. Once we have completed this fundamental survey, we will turn to selected works from later neo-Confucians and then turn for the last part of the course to an application of the Confucian ethical tradition to the modern world, specifically looking at political questions emerging in modern Asian societies.

RELG 109: Introduction to the Study of Religion
3 credit hours

Religion and religious ideas are central to all cultures and societies, including our own. This course will look at the broad range of cultural forms we have come to call religion, examine how these forms shape cultures and societies, and finally, by examining what these forms have in common and how they differ, we will determine what it is we study when we study religion.

RELG 203: Introduction to the Bible
3 credit hours

An introductory study of the Hebrew scriptures and the Christian New Testament with attention to the literature of these sacred texts, the historical circumstances of their development and the methods of textual interpretation.

SPAN 313: These Are Not Sweet Girls: Hispanic Women's Literature
3 credit hours

This course investigates issues of power, space and archetypes in the literature written by Hispanic women. Beginning with the first great women writers, this course proceeds chronologically to the twenty-first century.

THTR 267: Play Analysis
3 credit hours

Students will read, attend and analyze plays in terms of both structure and points of view relative to various theatrical disciplines. This core class provides a foundation to better understand the translation from page to performance by examining the relationships of playwrights, directors, designers, actors and audience in the context of producing a play.

Category 7: Exploring Global Cultures

ANML 201: Beauty and the Beast: Animal Issues Around the World
3 credit hours

Animals: We delight in their companionship; ride, hunt, eat and watch them; entertain ourselves with them; empathize with their suffering; use them to satisfy our vanity; hoard them; experiment on them; dress them and even eulogize them. Animals are simultaneously ubiquitous and hidden from our view. Our lives intersect with the lives of animals every day, yet our relationships with them remain a paradox. In this course, students will study contemporary issues about how our lives intersect with the lives of animals globally. In their quest to become liberally educated individuals, students will develop necessary intellectual and scholarly skills of close reading, cogent writing, thoughtful thinking and debating respectfully with others who disagree with them.

ARAB 101: Elementary Arabic I
3 credit hours

For beginners. Designed to develop, with ARAB 102, an elementary proficiency in Arabic. This course provides instruction for and assesses students' reading, writing, speaking and listening and provides an introduction to the cultures and cultural practices of the Arabic-speaking world.

ARTH 153: Visual Literacy - Art History and Culture
3 credit hours

Using a range of visual objects, from contemporary advertisements to works of art, from ancient artifacts to architecture and graphic novels, this course introduces students to the skills of critical seeing, analysis and interpretation to help them make meaning from, and discern cultural values encoded within, visual imagery.

CHIN 101: Elementary Mandarin I
3 credit hours

For beginners. Designed to develop an elementary proficiency for communicating in Mandarin and some familiarity with the writing system.

FREN 101: Elementary French I
3 credit hours

 For beginners. Designed to develop, with FREN 102, an elementary proficiency in French. This course provides instruction for and assesses students’ reading, writing, speaking and listening and provides an introduction to the cultures and cultural practices of the French?speaking world.

FREN 102: Elementary French II
3 credit hours

A continuation of FREN 101, designed to continue the development of an elementary proficiency for producing and comprehending the French language. This course provides instruction for and assesses students’ reading, writing, speaking, listening and develops students’ knowledge of the cultures and cultural practices of the French-speaking world.

HIST 109: Asian History to 1700
3 credit hours

This course examines the cultural traditions and transformations in Asian history from its origins to around 1700. Identifies specific historical events, political developments and philosophical, religious and social innovations in the history of East Asia, South Asia and Southeast Asia as well as highlights the contributions and transformations as it interacts with other world civilizations.

HIST 346: History of Modern China
3 credit hours

An in-depth study of contemporary Chinese culture and history, with an examination of revolutionary movements and modernization.

SOCI 202: Global Social Problems
3 credit hours

This course applies the sociological perspective to an examination of major global social problems, such as race and ethnic conflict, war, public health, poverty, population, and environmental issues. This includes a focus on how famine and endemic hunger are socially defined; the global political, economic, and cultural context in which each emerge; and how this context shapes responses to the problems in different countries where they exist.

SPAN 101: Elementary Spanish I
3 credit hours

For beginners. Designed to develop, with SPAN 102, an elementary proficiency in Spanish. This course provides instruction for and assesses students’ reading, writing, speaking and listening and provides an introduction to the cultures and cultural practices of the Spanish-speaking world.

SPAN 102: Elementary Spanish II
3 credit hours

A continuation of SPAN 101, designed to continue the development of an elementary proficiency for producing and comprehending the Spanish language. This course provides instruction for and assesses students’ reading, writing, speaking, listening and develops students’ knowledge of the cultures and cultural practices of the Spanish-speaking world.

THTR 135: Introduction to Theatre
3 credit hours

A survey of all aspects of the theatre and theatrical production including a study of representative artifacts of theatre history, a variety of dramatic styles and the work of the individual theatre artists involved in the process as well as the role of the audience in theatre.