The Curriculum

The Drury Core curriculum has two parts: common requirements and divisional requirements.

Part One

CORE 101: Drury Seminar
3 credit hours

This course introduces students to the expectations of academic work at the collegiate level. Particular emphasis lies on developing students’ skills in writing, critical thinking and information literacy. Each course section has its own theme, developed by faculty members from a wide variety of disciplines.

CORE : Drury Foundations
3 credit hours

Courses that meet this requirement foster students’ development in written and oral expression:

  • ANML 201: Beauty and the Beast: Animal Issues around the World
  • COMM 208: Introduction to Argumentation and Debate
  • COMM 211: Presentational Speaking
  • COMM 221: Multimedia Writing
  • ENGL 200: Literature Matters
  • ENGL 207: Expository Writing: The Art of the Essay
  • FREN 110: Food for Thought: Cuisine & Culture in the French Speaking World
  • HIST 250: Colonial America
  • HIST 252: U.S. Sports History
  • HIST 255: The Black Death
  • HIST 258: Revolutions, 1789-1917
  • PHIL 100: Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking
  • PHIL 101: The Meaning of Life
  • PHIL 208: Philosophy of Language
  • PLSC 150: Beyond the Headlines: Tools for Engaging the Political World
  • RELG 203: Introduction to the Bible
  • RELG 206: Eastern Religion and Philosophies
  • RELG 270: Who is Jesus?
  • RELG 275: Does God Exist?
CORE 103: Drury Explorations
1 credit hours

This course aims to facilitate students’ continued transition to college life. The course focuses on a variety of issues that pertain to life on campus and in the global community.

CORE 104: Drury by Design (Transfer Students Only)
.5 credit hours

This course supports transfer students in their first semester at Drury, helping them connect with academic and co-curricular opportunities. There will be at least two group meetings and two one-on-one meetings with the instructor, with follow up assignments tracked through Moodle.

CORE 201: Global Foundations
3 credit hours

This course introduces students to the study of globalization and its impacts. Emphasis lies on the study of globalization as a concept, as well as the application of the concept to the examination of contemporary issues. Some courses focus on specific issues or world regions. Each section draws on the expertise of the individual faculty member.

CORE : Ethical Foundations
3 credit hours

Courses that meet this requirement foster students’ understanding of, and commitment to, ethics and ethical reasoning:

  • ANML 212: Animal Ethics
  • COMM 285: Communication and Ethics
  • CRIM 341: Justice, Punishment and Ethics
  • ENGL 342: Shakespeare and Ethics
  • ENTR 250: Ethical Problems/Entrepreneurial Answers
  • PHIL 250: Business Ethics
  • PHIL 305: Ethical Issues in Health Care
  • PHIL 310: Asian Ethics
  • PHIL 316: Ethics
  • PHIL 320: Environmental Ethics
  • RELG 309: Christian Ethics
CORE : Foreign Language
6 credit hours

Students meet this requirement through the study of one of the following languages:

  • Arabic
  • Biblical Greek
  • French
  • Greek
  • Spanish

Students may also meet this requirement by completing eligible coursework offered through the Foreign Language Institute. FLI courses are eligible only if they provide instruction in (and assess) five skill areas: reading, writing, speaking, listening and cultural literacy. Language courses at the 103, 104, 203 and 204 level do not meet this requirement.

International students who meet regular admissions requirements and who graduated from a high school in which English was not the primary language of instruction are not required to fulfill this requirement. International students who complete the EAP program with a grade of B or above may not be required to fulfill this requirement.

EXSP 220: Personal Wellness
2 credit hours

This course introduces students to the key components of wellness. Students will become familiar with testing methods and personal program development for areas such as: aerobic and anaerobic training, stress management and nutrition. Critical thinking about contemporary wellness issues will be discussed.

or

BIOL 206: Human Physiology
4 credit hours

This course examines the organization and function of the human body as a whole and the interrelations of its various systems, organs, tissues, and cells. Lecture and laboratory.

BIOL 302: Human Nutrition
3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  BIOL 110 or BIOL 172
A study of food as it functions to meet body needs with emphasis on utilization, food sources, selection of adequate diets, individual, community, and world health problems and diet therapy.

BIOL 327: Psychopharmacology
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: BIOL 172 or PSYC 356.  
This course will explore the effects of drugs on behavior as well as how these effects are mediated by changes in synaptic activity. Emphasis is given to psychoactive drugs, such as alcohol, barbiturates, inhalants, benzodiazepines, psychostimulants, psychedelics, analgesics and antidepressants. This course has been approved as an Honors qualified course.

BIOL 378: Advanced Human Physiology I
5 credit hours

Prerequisites: BIOL 181 and CHEM 315
The first section of this course deals with cell signaling mechanisms, such as c?AMP and G?proteins, as well as receptor functions. The section deals with electrophysiology and the function of the nervous muscular system, and the general physiology of the cardiovascular system. Subjects will be covered through reading from text and journal articles, lecture presentation and laboratory projects.

CORE : Writing in the Major (Varied Requirements)
credit hours

Drury’s commitment to teaching students to write well extends to each department and major program. All students complete at least one junior-level writing-intensive course specifically designed to provide formal instruction in writing within their field of study. In many departments, the junior-level experience represents one course in a sequence of courses that ensures students develop strong writing abilities that will set them apart in their disciplines, professional careers, and graduate and professional programs.

Students meet the Writing the Major requirement at the departmental level as follows:

  • Accounting
    • MGMT 301: Leadership and Organizations
    • MKTG 337: Marketing
  • Animation
    • ENGL 266: Creative Writing
    • ARTH 293: History of Animation
  • Architecture
    • ARCH 253: Theories of Architecture
  • Arts Administration
    • The writing requirement(s) in the field of study taken in conjunction with Arts Administration
  • Behavioral Sciences
    • BSCI 359: Advanced Behavioral Research I
    • BSCI 361: Advanced Behavioral Research II
  • Biology
    • BIOL 351: Junior Seminar I
    • BIOL 352: Junior Seminar II
  • Chemistry
    • CHEM 315-L: Organic Chemistry Lab or
    • CHEM 336-L: Biochemistry Lab
  • Computer Science
    • CSCI 495: Research and Development I
    • CSCI 496: Research and Development II
  • Criminology
    • CRIM 359: Advanced Behavioral Research I
    • CRIM 361: Advanced Behavioral Research II
  • Economics
    • MGMT 301: Leadership and Organizations
    • MKTG 337: Marketing
  • Education
    • EDUC 452: Correction of Literacy Problems (Elementary Education Majors)
    • EDUC 304: Teaching in Diverse Classrooms (Secondary Education Majors)
  • English
    • ENGL 301: Theory and Practice
  • Exercise Physiology
    • EXSP 311: History and Principles of Exercise and Sports Science
    • BIOL 350: Exercise Physiology
  • Finance
    • MGMT 301: Leadership and Organizations
    • MKTG 337: Marketing
  • Fine Arts
    • ARTZ 304: Praxis Studio
  • French
    • Three 300 or 400 level writing intensive courses
  • Graphic and Digital Design
    • ARTZ 304: Praxis Studio
  • History
    • Four 300-level writing-intensive courses
  • Management
    • MGMT 301: Leadership and Organizations
    • MKTG 337: Marketing
  • Marketing
    • MGMT 301: Leadership and Organizations
    • MKTG 337: Marketing
  • Mathematics
    • MATH 301: Abstract Algebra
  • Multimedia Production and Journalism
    • COMM 386: Web Communication
  • Music
    • MUSC 321: History of Music I
    • MUSC 322: History of Music II
  • Organizational and Leadership Communication
    • COMM 355: Organizational Rhetoric
    • COMM 387: Organizational Communication
  • Philosophy
    • Two 300-level History of Philosophy courses (PHIL 311 or 312, and PHIL 313 or 314)
  • Physics
    • PHYS 309: Modern Physics
    • PHYS 400: Mechanics I
    • PHYS 401: Mechanics II
  • Political Science
    • Five 300-level writing intensive courses
  • Psychology
    • PSYC 359: Advanced Behavioral Research I
    • PSYC 361: Advanced Behavioral Research II
  • Religion
    • The departmental ethics requirement (RELG 305, 309, 310, or 320)
  • Sociology
    • SOCI 359: Advanced Behavioral Research I
    • SOCI 361: Advanced Behavioral Research II
  • Spanish
    • At least one literature course (either SPAN 411; SPAN 311; SPAN 312; or SPAN 313) and one culture course (either SPAN 302; SPAN 303; SPAN 308)
  • Strategic Communication
    • COMM 413: Promotional Case Studies
    • COMM 435: Organizational Crisis and Change
  • Theatre
    • THTR 340: History of Theatre I
    • THTR 341: History of Theatre II
    • THTR 343: History of Theatre III
  • Writing
    • ENGL 301: Theory and Practice

Engaged Learning (2 experiences)


CORE Course Descriptions

00 Level Courses
CORE : Drury Foundations. 3 hours.

Courses that meet this requirement foster students’ development in written and oral expression:

  • ANML 201: Beauty and the Beast: Animal Issues around the World
  • COMM 208: Introduction to Argumentation and Debate
  • COMM 211: Presentational Speaking
  • COMM 221: Multimedia Writing
  • ENGL 200: Literature Matters
  • ENGL 207: Expository Writing: The Art of the Essay
  • FREN 110: Food for Thought: Cuisine & Culture in the French Speaking World
  • HIST 250: Colonial America
  • HIST 252: U.S. Sports History
  • HIST 255: The Black Death
  • HIST 258: Revolutions, 1789-1917
  • PHIL 100: Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking
  • PHIL 101: The Meaning of Life
  • PHIL 208: Philosophy of Language
  • PLSC 150: Beyond the Headlines: Tools for Engaging the Political World
  • RELG 203: Introduction to the Bible
  • RELG 206: Eastern Religion and Philosophies
  • RELG 270: Who is Jesus?
  • RELG 275: Does God Exist?
CORE : Ethical Foundations. 3 hours.

Courses that meet this requirement foster students’ understanding of, and commitment to, ethics and ethical reasoning:

  • ANML 212: Animal Ethics
  • COMM 285: Communication and Ethics
  • CRIM 341: Justice, Punishment and Ethics
  • ENGL 342: Shakespeare and Ethics
  • ENTR 250: Ethical Problems/Entrepreneurial Answers
  • PHIL 250: Business Ethics
  • PHIL 305: Ethical Issues in Health Care
  • PHIL 310: Asian Ethics
  • PHIL 316: Ethics
  • PHIL 320: Environmental Ethics
  • RELG 309: Christian Ethics
CORE : Foreign Language. 6 hours.

Students meet this requirement through the study of one of the following languages:

  • Arabic
  • Biblical Greek
  • French
  • Greek
  • Spanish

Students may also meet this requirement by completing eligible coursework offered through the Foreign Language Institute. FLI courses are eligible only if they provide instruction in (and assess) five skill areas: reading, writing, speaking, listening and cultural literacy. Language courses at the 103, 104, 203 and 204 level do not meet this requirement.

International students who meet regular admissions requirements and who graduated from a high school in which English was not the primary language of instruction are not required to fulfill this requirement. International students who complete the EAP program with a grade of B or above may not be required to fulfill this requirement.

CORE : Writing in the Major (Varied Requirements). hours.

Drury’s commitment to teaching students to write well extends to each department and major program. All students complete at least one junior-level writing-intensive course specifically designed to provide formal instruction in writing within their field of study. In many departments, the junior-level experience represents one course in a sequence of courses that ensures students develop strong writing abilities that will set them apart in their disciplines, professional careers, and graduate and professional programs.

Students meet the Writing the Major requirement at the departmental level as follows:

  • Accounting
    • MGMT 301: Leadership and Organizations
    • MKTG 337: Marketing
  • Animation
    • ENGL 266: Creative Writing
    • ARTH 293: History of Animation
  • Architecture
    • ARCH 253: Theories of Architecture
  • Arts Administration
    • The writing requirement(s) in the field of study taken in conjunction with Arts Administration
  • Behavioral Sciences
    • BSCI 359: Advanced Behavioral Research I
    • BSCI 361: Advanced Behavioral Research II
  • Biology
    • BIOL 351: Junior Seminar I
    • BIOL 352: Junior Seminar II
  • Chemistry
    • CHEM 315-L: Organic Chemistry Lab or
    • CHEM 336-L: Biochemistry Lab
  • Computer Science
    • CSCI 495: Research and Development I
    • CSCI 496: Research and Development II
  • Criminology
    • CRIM 359: Advanced Behavioral Research I
    • CRIM 361: Advanced Behavioral Research II
  • Economics
    • MGMT 301: Leadership and Organizations
    • MKTG 337: Marketing
  • Education
    • EDUC 452: Correction of Literacy Problems (Elementary Education Majors)
    • EDUC 304: Teaching in Diverse Classrooms (Secondary Education Majors)
  • English
    • ENGL 301: Theory and Practice
  • Exercise Physiology
    • EXSP 311: History and Principles of Exercise and Sports Science
    • BIOL 350: Exercise Physiology
  • Finance
    • MGMT 301: Leadership and Organizations
    • MKTG 337: Marketing
  • Fine Arts
    • ARTZ 304: Praxis Studio
  • French
    • Three 300 or 400 level writing intensive courses
  • Graphic and Digital Design
    • ARTZ 304: Praxis Studio
  • History
    • Four 300-level writing-intensive courses
  • Management
    • MGMT 301: Leadership and Organizations
    • MKTG 337: Marketing
  • Marketing
    • MGMT 301: Leadership and Organizations
    • MKTG 337: Marketing
  • Mathematics
    • MATH 301: Abstract Algebra
  • Multimedia Production and Journalism
    • COMM 386: Web Communication
  • Music
    • MUSC 321: History of Music I
    • MUSC 322: History of Music II
  • Organizational and Leadership Communication
    • COMM 355: Organizational Rhetoric
    • COMM 387: Organizational Communication
  • Philosophy
    • Two 300-level History of Philosophy courses (PHIL 311 or 312, and PHIL 313 or 314)
  • Physics
    • PHYS 309: Modern Physics
    • PHYS 400: Mechanics I
    • PHYS 401: Mechanics II
  • Political Science
    • Five 300-level writing intensive courses
  • Psychology
    • PSYC 359: Advanced Behavioral Research I
    • PSYC 361: Advanced Behavioral Research II
  • Religion
    • The departmental ethics requirement (RELG 305, 309, 310, or 320)
  • Sociology
    • SOCI 359: Advanced Behavioral Research I
    • SOCI 361: Advanced Behavioral Research II
  • Spanish
    • At least one literature course (either SPAN 411; SPAN 311; SPAN 312; or SPAN 313) and one culture course (either SPAN 302; SPAN 303; SPAN 308)
  • Strategic Communication
    • COMM 413: Promotional Case Studies
    • COMM 435: Organizational Crisis and Change
  • Theatre
    • THTR 340: History of Theatre I
    • THTR 341: History of Theatre II
    • THTR 343: History of Theatre III
  • Writing
    • ENGL 301: Theory and Practice
100 Level Courses
CORE 101: Drury Seminar. 3 hours.

This course introduces students to the expectations of academic work at the collegiate level. Particular emphasis lies on developing students’ skills in writing, critical thinking and information literacy. Each course section has its own theme, developed by faculty members from a wide variety of disciplines.

CORE 103: Drury Explorations. 1 hour.

This course aims to facilitate students’ continued transition to college life. The course focuses on a variety of issues that pertain to life on campus and in the global community.

CORE 104: Drury by Design (Transfer Students Only). .5 hours.

This course supports transfer students in their first semester at Drury, helping them connect with academic and co-curricular opportunities. There will be at least two group meetings and two one-on-one meetings with the instructor, with follow up assignments tracked through Moodle.

200 Level Courses
CORE 201: Global Foundations. 3 hours.

This course introduces students to the study of globalization and its impacts. Emphasis lies on the study of globalization as a concept, as well as the application of the concept to the examination of contemporary issues. Some courses focus on specific issues or world regions. Each section draws on the expertise of the individual faculty member.