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Email Fraud & Hacked Accounts

Email Fraud - Scams, Spam, & Phishing

Educational email addresses are frequent victims of spam email and phishing attempts. Unfortunately, this means that Drury accounts are particularly vulnerable. Although it's hard to stop or avoid all fraudulent email, with a little bit of knowledge you can usually steer clear of bad actors.

Things to look for:

  • Emails that ask you to reply and send personal or account information ("click reply and give us your correct address").

  • Emails that give deadlines and create a sense of urgency ("Reply needed urgently" or  "24 hours to reply").

  • Links that go to web sites you don't know or are unfamiliar with. "Hover to discover" can be used to view an address and determine if it's a site you trust or not. ("www.druryedu.me" would be a bad address; www.drury.edu is good).

  • Poor and awkward grammar and sentence structure and misspellings. Many of these emails are written by people with English as their second language or even by computers! Read carefully and look for odd combinations of words, punctuation, etc.

  • No personal salutation or closing. ("Hello," without any name, or just "Sincerely" at the bottom of an email without a name or other details).

  • It offers a job or requests assistance from someone high up in the organization. These are two of the most commonly used scams at Drury. Pet sitting/house cleaning/mystery shopping/Dr. Cloyd needing you immediately should all be ignored.

  • It's too good to be true. Example: $350 a week to walk a dog once a day.

Even if you recognize the account the email is from, such as an email from someone at Drury, the email could  still be fraudulent. Check the content with the above information in mind. If the email appears to come from a company, contact the company's customer service via phone or web browser to see if the email is legitimate.

View our new "Phishing - Don't take the Bait" video to find out more!