Drury hosts Missouri Humanities Council symposium on “Humanities & the Future”

SPRINGFIELD, Mo., March 12, 2018 — Author, historian, and public intellectual Dr. Brandy Schillace will headline the “Humanities and the Future” symposium hosted by the Missouri Humanities Council and held on the campus of Drury University on March 22. The event is free and open to the public.

Schillace, will deliver her public talk, Dread Tech Tales: Unexpected Consequences of Humans and Machines, at 5:30 p.m. in the Trustee Science Center. Schillace is a researcher and senior engagement fellow for the Dittrick Museum of Medical History in Cleveland, and is editor-in-chief of the journal “Medical Humanities.” Her most recent book, “Clockwork Futures,” explores the science behind steampunk and how Victorian inventors and authors helped lay the groundwork for the modern age

“We’re incredibly excited that Dr. Schillace will headline our symposium. She is exceptional at drawing listeners into engaging stories about the intersections between the human experience and scientific inventions,” says Dr. Katie Gilbert, associate professor of English and Director of the Humanities and Ethics Center at Drury, who is working in partnership with MHC to help expand the organizations’ reach statewide.

Prior to the evening keynote, the daylong “Humanities and the Future” symposium will feature a discussion on the digital humanities, a networking lunch, a reading discussion of Eric Touya de Marenne’s book “The Case for the Humanities,” and a panel on the medical humanities called “Medicine, Narrative and the Human Experience.” The sessions will feature experts and academics from Drury, Missouri State University, the Springfield-Greene County Library District and the UMKC School of Medicine.

“This symposium embraces interdisciplinarity, and brings together aspects of history, storytelling, health and medicine, digital technology, and other fields in a series of robust discussions,” Gilbert says. “While so often we think of the humanities, or the study of the records of human experience, as separate from science, medicine, and technology. The fields are in fact intertwined and help to shape each other. The big questions that we face now and in the future as human beings will demand answers that are interdisciplinary in scope; the humanities are especially adept at laying the groundwork for such interdisciplinary exploration.”

The full schedule of events and panelists is available online. The symposium is free but registration is required for the daytime events. Registration is available online. No registration or tickets are required for Dr. Brandy Schillace’s evening talk. 

About the Missouri Humanities Council

Formed in 1971, the MHC provides programming that encourages family reading, highlights Missouri’s heritage, supports creative writing by veterans, and assists local museums, libraries, and other organizations promoting education. MHC helps facilitate public conversations on topics that include history, religion, archaeology, anthropology, philosophy, literature, law, ethics, and languages. More information: http://www.mohumanities.org.  

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Contact: Dr. Katie Gilbert - Associate Professor of English, Director of the Drury Humanities and Ethics Center, and Field Representative for Missouri Humanities Council: (417) 873-6941or kgilbert@drury.edu