About the CCPS Bachelor of General Studies

The programs for the degree Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) and the Associate of Science (AS) with an area of concentration in general studies are designed to provide an alternative to conventional degree programs and majors.

The BGS degree program is designed specifically for

  1. Persons with technical training who wish to broaden their specialized background to include a liberal arts education, or
  2. Persons who wish to develop an interdisciplinary program tailored to their individual needs and interests.

A complete description of the requirements for the General Studies major can be found in the Academic Affairs section of this catalog under the sub-head: “Bachelor of General Studies.”

View General Education Requirements     View Requirements for Graduation


Bachelor of General Studies

The following 10 hours are required for all General Studies majors: 

LIBR 211: Information Research Skills
1 credit hours

An introduction to strategies and skills for defining information needs, understanding principles of information organization and retrieval, identifying appropriate library and non-library resources, evaluating information and using it legally and ethically. Knowledge and skills acquired apply to research for classroom purposes and for personal needs. Course must be completed prior to sophomore standing. Required for all bachelor degrees.

GSTU 493: Senior Seminar
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: LIBR 211. 
This course helps students relate their primary field of interest (mathematics and science, humanities and fine arts, or social sciences) to various world cultures. Students will exit the class with a greater understanding of the world around them and their role in it. Students registering for this capstone class for the Bachelor of General Studies degree must have senior status with 90 or more earned college hours.

PSYC 101: Introduction to Psychology
3 credit hours

This is a survey course providing a study of the behavior of living organisms, particularly human behavior. Typical problems are methods and measurement in psychology, theoretical systems, learning, motivation, perception, personality and psychopathology.

PDEV 200: Introduction to Global Leadership and Sustainability
3 credit hours

This course furthers the discussion of student leadership theory with the statement “Let’s change the world.” To develop a personal philosophy of global leadership, student leaders will be mindful of the role of diversity of our increasingly multi-cultural society and the manner in which issues of environment and sustainability relate to global leadership.

Track 1: Sustainability 

BIOL 172: Exploring Molecular Biology
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: BIOL 102. 
This course examines the structure and function of nucleic acids and proteins. The molecular mechanisms of replication, transcription, mRNA processing and translation will be emphasized. In addition, regulation of these processes will be explored. Intended for students majoring in biology or related disciplines.

BIOL 200: Ecology
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: BIOL 172. DAY Prerequisite or Co-Requisite: BIOL182.
An introduction to ecological principles, emphasizing processes and patterns within the six sub-disciplines of ecology. The laboratory will integrate common field methods with experimental design and data analysis. Lecture and laboratory.

BIOL 201: Biodiversity
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: BIOL 172. DAY-BIOL 200.
An introduction to the trends and patterns of biological diversity and our understanding of the biosphere. The class will focus on the evolution of genomes and systems using several model organisms. The generation and loss of biodiversity will be examined. Lecture and laboratory.

BIOL 338: Biology of Lakes and Streams
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: BIOL 201. 
An examination of Missouri’s lakes and streams with emphasis on structural morphology, habitats, flora and fauna characteristics and limnology. Also included will be laboratory and field exercises on identification, sampling methods and preparation of study specimens.

ENVR 220: Introduction to Environmental Issues
3 credit hours

An introductory approach to the factual and ethical views regarding current and future environments designed to familiarize students with various frameworks and choices. Course explores several contemporary approaches to environmental ethics and representative theoretical problems.

ENVR 315: Environmental Laws and Regulations
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ENVR 220. 
An introduction to hazardous waste regulations, solid waste management programs, the Clean Air Act, OSHA regulations, the Clean Water Act, environmental audits, remediation technology, and issues relating to the impact of environmental laws on society.

ENVR 316: Environmental Compliance
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ENVR 315. 
This course will provide a “next logical step” beyond Environmental Laws and Regulations, and focus on the practical and policy issues, as well as the varying options that may be available for compliance with those laws and regulations. It is specifically designed in addition to be of particular interest and use to those in the workplace who may currently have or may anticipate having responsibilities in the areas of environmental management and compliance issues.

ENVR 326: Environmental and Community Health
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: ENVR 220. 
This course will examine the relationships between the environment and human health. Specifically, looking at how our environment affects personal and community health throughout the world. Offered spring semester.

LDST 425: Leading Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability
3 credit hours

Twenty-first century leaders must be prepared to do more in their organizations than maximize profitability. They must also satisfy expectations that their organizations demonstrate a strong commitment to society in its values on social, environmental and economic goals; protect society from negative company actions or accidents; share the benefits of operation with constituents and become more profitable by "doing well by doing good." In addition, leaders must show conscious efforts to protect natural resources and implement strategies to ensure their sustainability for future generations. In this course, students will gain an understanding of the complex relationship between concern for the environment and the goals of organizations, as well as the philosophy that the most successful organizations are those that "give back" to society. Discussions will center on leadership actions to promote corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability, including consideration of wasted resources, pollution and other environmental impacts of organizations. CSR and sustainability are now global expectations and will likely become even more significant in the future. Leaders who realize this and are prepared to help their organizations meet these challenges are primed for future success.

PHIL 320: Environmental Ethics
3 credit hours

This course seeks to develop a better understanding of both the factual and ethical dimensions of our current and possible future environments. Explores several contemporary approaches in environmental ethics (including: deep ecology, ecofeminism, animal rights, market efficiencies, the loss of biodiversity and responses from deontological, utilitarian, and virtue ethics, etc.) and representative theoretical problems (e.g., Aldo Leopold’s “land ethic” vs. natural rights views, ecological holism vs. moral atomism, market efficiency vs. moral obligations, etc.) Using a case-study approach, students then learn to apply different ethical frameworks to several ethical choices occasioned by human interaction with the natural order.

Track 2: Organizational Leadership

COMM 220: Business Communication and Writing
3 credit hours

Topics considered in this course include basic principles of effective oral and written communication, a brief survey of standard English grammar and usage, and the forms and styles of business correspondence.

COMM 387: Organizational Communication
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: COMM 215. 
Analysis of how organizations are produced and affected by communication. This course provides an in-depth examination and application of theories, contemporary perspectives and research in fields of organizational communication. Topics include organizational structures, culture, socialization, decision making, diversity, stress, burnout, technology processes and leadership.

EMMT 303: Disaster Planning and Preparedness
3 credit hours

This course provides an overview of the preparedness phase of emergency management. Topics include emergency planning, public information and education, risk and vulnerability assessments, continuity of operations, communication and information management, gap analysis and capacity building, funding strategies, and exercises.

LDST 101: Foundations of Leadership Studies
3 credit hours

General introduction to, and analysis of, historical and current theories of leadership. Study of leadership process involving interaction of leaders and followers in organizational settings such as public/private, profit and nonprofit.

LDST 435: Strategic Leadership
3 credit hours

Leaders of today’s organizations are expected to have the vision for the future direction of the operation and to apply principles of strategic leadership to achieve it. To be successful, leaders must think strategically and make excellent use of available resources in accomplishing the organization’s goals. In this course, students will discuss an approach to strategic leadership that considers the organization’s environment, both external and internal. The basics of developing strategy to achieve goals at several operational levels will also be discussed, along with how such strategy may be effectively implemented and controlled. For those aspiring to one day be top leaders of progressive organizations, this course may be essential.

LDST 331: Negotiation and Conflict Resolution
3 credit hours

This course examines conflict causes and effects as well as ethical issues. Students will use case studies and simulations to practice skills for conflict resolution. An investigation of theoretical and practical aspects of conflict assessment, negotiation, problem solving and mediation are integral to this process.

LDST 420: Managing Multi-Cultural Organizations
3 credit hours

The United States has always been referred to as a ‘melting pot’ with people from all cultures residing throughout. In addition to being a capable communicator with different cultures within the U.S., managers must also be able to interact with individuals living in other countries. As the U.S. becomes more and more ethnically diversified the world is becoming smaller through technology, e-commerce, and political interdependence. Even small businesses need skills in multi-cultural communication to understand the complexities of business and culturally specific practices.

PDEV 289: Introduction to Leadership Development
3 credit hours

In this class, students will study leadership and how it relates to the individual, the team and the community. The interdependent relationship between leaders, followers, and creating positive change will be considered. Students will investigate their personal strengths and challenges in leadership, seek to understand how leadership relates to group effectiveness, and explore community issues and local resources. A variety of leadership theories will be explored with an emphasis on the social change model of leadership development. This course includes a service-learning project.

PSYC 355: Industrial Organizational Psychology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CCPS - BSCI 274. Day - BSCI 275 and BSCI 275-L.
A systematic study of human behavior in the world of work. Examines selection, evaluation, appraisal and training as aspects of personnel psychology. Focuses on the psychology of work in terms of worker motivation, job satisfaction and adjustment.

Track 3: Resolution & Peacebuilding

COMM 229: Business and Professional Presentations
3 credit hours

Designed to familiarize students with communication skills in a variety of organizational, business and professional settings. Practice in planning and doing oral presentations effectively.

COMM 285: Communication and Ethics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CCPS-None. Day-COMM 215.
Introduction to ethics in communication studies. Students examine conceptual perspectives for understanding and evaluating communication ethics in interpersonal relationships, small groups, organizations and intercultural contexts. This course is designed to stimulate the moral imagination, reveal ethical issues inherent in communication and provide resources for making and defending choices on ethical grounds.

COMM 332: Intercultural Communication
3 credit hours

A survey of critical and qualitative inquiry into intercultural communication. This course provides an introduction to the tenets of intercultural research as well as in-depth analysis of intercultural communication competency and cultural criticism. Topics include introductory readings in ethnography, social anthropology and communication studies, and numerous case studies across various cultures. Theories include nonverbal communication analysis and facework across cultures. Diversity issues and identity politics are explored.

COMM 351: Principles of Persuasion and Influence
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: COMM 211 and COMM 215. 
A study of the persuasive process in contemporary culture. Students study basic theories of persuasion and public speaking in an effort to become responsible consumers and creators of public persuasion. Practical applications are made by presenting persuasive speeches and critical projects.

COMM 422: Argumentation and Advocacy
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: COMM 211.  
The First Amendment coupled with our marketplace of ideas mentality requires that competent communicators get and practice critical-thinking skills. Argumentation and Advocacy explores these skills in tandem with the public discourse vehicle. Students are required to examine and deploy various approaches in making and evaluating arguments in a public setting. Theories explored include transmission models of communication, Stephen Toulmin’s model of argumentation and critical theory as it is applied to communication studies and the professions.

LDST 331: Negotiation and Conflict Resolution
3 credit hours

This course examines conflict causes and effects as well as ethical issues. Students will use case studies and simulations to practice skills for conflict resolution. An investigation of theoretical and practical aspects of conflict assessment, negotiation, problem solving and mediation are integral to this process.

LDST 338: Organizational Relations
3 credit hours

Successful leaders in organizations have an understanding of basic individual and group behavior. Great leaders have exceptional insight into essential relationships and how to interact effectively with their coworkers. Great managers know how to help people under their supervision succeed. This course offers an emphasis on typical interpersonal, managerial and leadership relationships, with an emphasis on the things effective managers and leaders do to ensure success. The differences between management and leadership will be discussed and we will look at personal leadership styles and evaluate ourselves to identify strengths as well as areas requiring development. In addition, we will discuss effective leadership behaviors and why they work. Models and concepts regarding leadership that are put forth in the texts will be discussed along with team and individual dynamics that may affect workplace behavior. Self-reflective writing may also be included in the learning process.

PSYC 110: Stress Management I
3 credit hours

The philosophy and comprehensive approach to stress reduction through the re-establishment and enhancement of the state of well-being.

PSYC 313: Cross-Cultural Psychology
3 credit hours

Explores the multiple and reciprocal nature of interaction between culture, intra-individual processes (such as perception, cognition, personality) and inter-individual processes (such as communication and group identity). Factors affecting these interactions, like ethnocentrism and prejudice, are also examined.

PSYC 355: Industrial Organizational Psychology
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CCPS - BSCI 274. Day - BSCI 275 and BSCI 275-L.
A systematic study of human behavior in the world of work. Examines selection, evaluation, appraisal and training as aspects of personnel psychology. Focuses on the psychology of work in terms of worker motivation, job satisfaction and adjustment.

Track 4: Individual Program

Individual Program - choose 30 additional hours in one of the three fields of knowledge: 

Humanities and Fine Arts

Science and Mathematics

Social Studies

18 hours must be 300-level or above

Track 5: Transfer Program

Transfer completed technical program