Dr. David Manuel

President

A letter from the president

strengthening our legacy

During the past year, I have reflected on how my professional path merged with the course and direction of Drury University. Besides acknowledging the steps along the way that prepared me for the challenge, the life lessons that shaped me and now inform my decision making, and the professional talents that complement those of the Drury administrative and faculty team, I am humbled by the strength and durability of the Drury culture as narrated in Dr. Frank Clippinger’s The Drury Story and Dr. Harvey Asher’s The Creation of a University: The Drury Story Continues, 1977-2004. All of this educated, energized and prepared me so that I might listen carefully to all.

Last September, I chose as the theme of my installation, “Learn, Engage and Serve,” because I was struck by the multi-generational commitment to these foundational objectives of the Drury University mission. Observations of my first year on campus are based on all of the above and tinted by conversations and interactions with faculty, staff, students, the Board of Trustees, community leaders, alumni, donors and a wide variety of Drury supporters. In addition, I have studied every strategic assessment of Drury University produced in the last ten years.

What have I learned?

  • The Drury University story is replete with successes and the struggles that typify many private universities in America;
  • Drury University faculty and staff are deeply committed to student success;
  • The heritage of Drury University successes is repeated many times in the examples of the lives and professions of Drury alumni and is further evidenced by legacy and multi-generational enrollments;
  • The Drury University Board of Trustees and our alumni are uniformly committed to the institution’s positive future;
  • Important strides have been made in some academic offerings and selected facility construction;
  • The model of a Drury University higher education that facilitated so many successes is the same model that generated a comfort level that may eschew adaptation to change;
  • To paraphrase President Morrison’s admonition (1875), in recent years, we may have kept our head up, but have we been bold enough? We may have moved forward, but has the pace been rapid enough? And we may have looked outward, but has our vision been clear?

I would like to offer some initial assessments of key areas of the University; they are not meant to be definitive, but rather opening commentaries that will lead to wider discussion as we formulate a new strategic plan:

Thank you for honoring and entrusting me with the leadership of Drury University. Together, we are engaged in an endeavor that has enormous consequences and our work must yield results that are bold and convincing. The path that has taken Drury University to its current state is marked by the many successes and struggles to which I referred earlier. Our task is to map a path that will not only capitalize on the lessons of these successes and struggles, but will also grasp the realities of the present with the intent to strengthen the legacy of Drury University in the 21st century.

Let us proceed onward and upward!

David Manuel

Jay Fedje

Dean of Admission

Embark

home. I felt at home from the minute I arrived in Springfield and walked onto the Drury campus.

In the midst of this significant life change for me, my wife Laurie and our sons Noah and Andrew, I believe the Lord provided a pathway to a new home here in Southwest Missouri. We immediately felt the warmth and friendliness of the community and for that, we are deeply grateful.

After spending more than two decades in higher education enrollment, I saw Drury as both a complex challenge and an amazing opportunity. I saw the potential to make a difference at a university nationally recognized for its academic excellence and strength. While I realized there was much to do, I also saw the opportunity for enrollment growth and development of world-impacting programs.

I heard the statement recently that universities should encourage their students to be “glocal” citizens. That’s a contrived word from “global” and “local,” and yet, it describes what I sense is an expectation of the Drury experience. I see our university environment offering a unique opportunity to bring the world to our campus to be locally engaged, while sending our students into the world to make a global impact. It’s that expectation that our students be fully engaged in a university experience, both relevant and world-class, that I see as our greatest distinction and our greatest opportunity for growth.

In this new era of college admissions, I believe it takes the entire university to recruit, enroll and retain a student. I’m confident that at Drury we are positioning ourselves well to build enrollment through university-wide initiatives like the Strategic Enrollment Planning Committee and a unified approach to marketing and recruitment. While growing enrollment is at the heart of our objectives, we're determined to increase it significantly, but strategically. With the support of the full university, I’m hopeful that we can forge a best-in-class approach to enrollment in these perilous times.

Jay Fedje

Dr. Chris Panza

Associate Professor,
Philosophy

The year 2014 continues to be a rough time for higher education.

The U.S. economy is still recovering from the 2008 financial meltdown, and a robust fifteen-year national growth trend in high school graduates ended in 2010 and turned quickly south. For universities, this means increased competition for fewer and more (understandably) price-conscious students. Drury’s response to this challenge must combine authenticity with mission, greater strategic enrollment focus, and renewed emphasis on creating, marketing and delivering educational value.

To address that challenge, in the spring of 2014 Drury initiated a strategic enrollment planning (SEP) process to focus university admissions, retention, marketing, financial aid and program development in order to reach key enrollment goals. Over the past seven months, as chair of SEP, I’ve been truly humbled by the passion, dedication and expertise that SEP’s roughly fifty faculty, staff, alumni, students and administration have brought to this important process. Truly, SEP is Drury at its best.

Looking backward and forward, the path of SEP is clear. In the spring, SEP performed a diagnostic of the external higher education environment, and then turned inward to assess Drury’s various strengths and weaknesses. This fall, SEP has turned its collective attention to a substantive medium-range target: developing an aggressive strategy for recruiting, retaining and successfully graduating transfer and international students. Our aim is to generate a larger – but more importantly, rich and diverse – student population.

Looking forward to the spring of 2015, SEP will turn to long-range strategy. We will engage in a data-driven analysis of potential recruitment areas, help create processes through which Drury can generate distinctive curricular and co-curricular programming, sharpen our marketing focus and redouble our efforts to support student success for those who choose to enroll.

We all know that Drury is an amazing experience for students, and so we look forward to continuing the work of SEP in order to assure that the university collectively focuses the development of a strong future and on becoming a widely-known value and sought-out destination for students throughout the Central United States.

Dr. Chris Panza

Dr. Charles Taylor

Vice President,
Academic Affairs;
Dean of the College;
Professor of Communication

Engage

UPHOLDING OUR MISSION

In his Epistulae ex Ponto, the Roman poet Ovid observed that “a faithful study of the liberal arts humanizes character and permits it not to be cruel.” This humanizing of character has always defined one of the central commitments of Drury University. Some pundits have argued that the importance of the liberal arts tradition has waned in the face of profound cultural and technological change. However, at Drury, we believe such changes are precisely why an outstanding education that integrates liberal and professional learning remains what Kenneth Burke called “the most fundamental equipment for living.” The centrality of the liberal arts penetrates to the most basic question of what it means to be a human being, to say nothing of being an informed, engaged and productive one.

This humanizing of character has always defined one of the central commitments of Drury University. Some pundits have argued that the importance of the liberal arts tradition has waned in the face of profound cultural and technological change. However, at Drury, we believe such changes are precisely why an outstanding education that integrates liberal and professional learning remains what Kenneth Burke called, “the most fundamental equipment for living.” The centrality of the liberal arts penetrates to the most basic question of what it means to be a human being, to say nothing of being an informed, engaged and productive one.

Perhaps the most tangible manifestation of this commitment to engaged liberal learning is to be found in our Drury CORE: Engaging our World general education curriculum. Now in its third year, the Drury CORE marks the maturation of Drury’s general education curriculum from the important, but passive, view of encouraging a global perspective to one that asks of us that we commit to becoming globally engaged.

As we cultivate the intellectual virtues of critical and reflective thought, we must always be mindful of the “ends” to which those virtues can most constructively be put. Our architecture students understand that they design not simply buildings, but homes that are parts of communities and nations and leave traces, however grand or humble, on the earth. Our business students understand that their entrepreneurial drive can indeed generate wealth from goods and services while simultaneously serving the common good. In short, then, a Drury education has always been and will always remain focused on “the big ideas,” which do not simply pile up, but rather add up. A Drury education adds up to a more meaningful understanding of ourselves, the world(s) around us, our relationships in and to that world, and of our collective responsibility to leaving it better than the way in which we first encountered it.

We insist on this level of engagement because there is overwhelming evidence that engaged learning practices such as internships, study abroad experiences, service learning and faculty−student research promote deep student learning. We also do this because, though we are proudly a private institution of higher learning, we understand that private higher education remains a public trust, and we are accountable for returning value to the communities in which we’re located. This is the essence of engaged liberal learning–and the essence of Drury.

Dr. Charles Taylor

Dr. Thomas E Russo

Professor,
Art & Art History;
Director, Study Abroad

Michael G. Thomas

Associate Dean, Study
Abroad & International
Programs

Experience

REACHING BEYOND TO GAIN UNDERSTANDING

Change. Our world is a vastly different place than it was at the start of the new millennium. From cutting edge technology to sustainable energy and international relations, our global connections are bringing both cultures and individuals closer together.

Study abroad, which plays a significant role in building intercultural understanding, awareness and relationships, has seen a number of changes since 2000 as well. Then, just over 154,000 U.S. students studied abroad. In 2012, statistics revealed that number had risen to over 283,000, or 14.2% of all U.S. bachelor’s degree recipients. At Drury, however, we are well above the national average. Read More

By the Numbers

Enrollment

Statement of Financial Position

Alumni by State

Alumni by Country

you are important to the future of drury

alumni stories about giving to drury are both diverse and inspiring.

Whether you are a recent graduate or a longtime supporter, you are each incredibly valuable and important to the future of Drury.

When you give to Drury, you are helping to sustain Drury's vision for today and tomorrow. Through The Drury Fund, your annual contributions provide needed scholarship assistance to our undergraduate and graduate students, ensure students’ engaged learning experiences, and support our outstanding faculty. Gifts to The Drury Fund—no matter the size—have an immediate and valuable impact on Drury students and our institution.

It’s easy to make a tax-deductible gift to Drury University. For gifts to The Drury Fund, you can use a check, cash or stock. If you wish to make monthly installment gifts, consider using a credit/debit card at http://give.drury.edu. Gifts of stock, real estate and bequests can provide tax benefits or even a fixed stream of income for you. Gifts of all kinds may be designated for immediate or current use or as a long- term investment through an endowment. Whether giving through The Drury Fund or a bequest, your support may be undesignated or allocated to a particular school or program. For more information on how to donate, visit http://give.drury.edu.

Many companies match our contributions. Contact your human resources office and inquire about a matching contribution. If so, you could double or even triple your gift. Questions? Contact the Office of Development and Alumni Relations at 888-353-7879 or alumni@drury.edu.

connect to drury

there are many ways to stay involved with drury.

Be sure to register for our online community and e-newsletter so you can receive timely information firsthand.

Be part of our online directory at http://alumni.drury.edu/login where you can share your life and career happenings while staying connected to your Drury friends.

Throughout the year we host a number of special events. These provide an excellent opportunity to connect you with your fellow alumni. To view upcoming events and register, click here.

Many companies match our contributions. Contact your human resources office and inquire about a matching contribution. If so, you could double or even triple your gift. Questions? Contact the Office of Development and Alumni Relations at 888-353-7879 or alumni@drury.edu.