About the Pre-Medicine Program

Drury University has excellent programs for students interested in allopathic medicine (M.D.) and osteopathic medicine (D.O.). Both types of medical schools require applicants to take the MCAT.

The time required to graduate from medical school is the same. Both types of medical students are eligible for the same internships and residencies. Unlike a traditional allopathic doctor, osteopathic doctors are trained in Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment and have a holistic approach to training. Requirements beyond core classes include: BIOL 320: Vertebrate Physiology, BIOL 322: Advanced Genetics, CHEM 336: Biochemistry, and CHEM 208: Analytical Chemistry.

Drury University offers four pre-medical scholars programs for incoming freshmen with high academic credentials. St. Louis University, Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, and the University of Missouri have partnered with DU to offer early acceptance into their medical schools conditional upon academics performance. These partnerships allow students to focus solely on their undergraduate education and alleviates the pressure of taking the MCAT. The pre-medical scholars programs eligibility requirements vary from school to school.

Program curriculum:

BIOL 172: Exploring Molecular Biology
3 credit hours

Recommended prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 115 or CHEM 238
This course examines the structure and function of nucleic acids and proteins. The molecular mechanisms of replication, transcription, mRNA processing and translation will be emphasized. In addition, regulation of these processes will be explored. Lecture and laboratory. Intended for students majoring in biology or related disciplines.

BIOL 181: Mechanisms of Genetic Inheritance
3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  BIOL 172
This course will apply the knowledge acquired in BIOL 172 to the inheritance patterns of genetic traits between individuals and within populations. Lecture and laboratory.

BIOL 182: Evolution
2 credit hours

Prerequisite: BIOL 181. 
An introduction to the principles of evolutionary biology, including the history, processes and patterns of evolution as well as systematic biology.

CHEM 208: Analytical Chemistry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 238.
A lecture course that covers analytical methods of chemical analysis. Topics include statistical analysis, quantitative chemical analysis, chemical equilibria, eletroanalytical techniques and fundamentals of spectroscopy.

CHEM 208-L: Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
1 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 238-L
A laboratory course designed to give students experiences with analytical methods of chemical analysis. Topics include data analysis, chemical equilibria (acid-base and complexation), redox titrations and spectroscopy.

CHEM 238: Inorganic Chemistry
3 credit hours

A fundamental course in the study of inorganic chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, nomenclature of inorganic compounds, fundamentals of inorganic complexes and an introduction to the chemistry of main group elements.

CHEM 238-L: Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
1 credit hours

A fundamental laboratory course in the study of inorganic chemistry. Topics include the preparation of inorganic complexes, resolution of chiral transition metal compounds, ion conductivity and a preparation of a main group inorganic compound.

CHEM 315: Organic Chemistry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 238
This lecture course is an in-depth study of organic functional group chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, aromatics and alcohols. Topics include nomenclature, stereochemistry, mechanisms, and theory.

CHEM 315-L: Organic Chemistry Laboratory
2 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 238-L
This laboratory course has a 1?hour lecture component that introduces the lab and complements CHEM 315. It develops organic lab skills and techniques with extensive hands?on experience and organic application of spectroscopy and instrumentation

CHEM 336: Biochemistry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 315 or CHEM 312. Recommended prerequisite: CHEM 327.  
A lecture course that studies the structure and function of biological molecules. Topics include enzyme kinetics, synthesis and degradation of biological molecules, and energy production. Emphasis will be placed on enzyme mechanisms and regulation.

CHEM 415: Advanced Organic Chemistry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 315.  
This lecture course continues in-depth study of organic functional group chemistry of carbonyl containing compounds and amines. Topics include spectroscopy, mechanisms, theory and an introduction to biochemistry and metabolic pathways.

CHEM 415-L: Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory
2 credit hours

Prerequisite:  CHEM 315-L or CHEM 312-L.  
A laboratory course has a 1?hour lecture component that introduces the lab and complements CHEM 415. It continues development of organic lab skills and techniques. Topics covered will include multi-step synthesis, open- ended projects involving experimental design and an introduction to enzyme catalysis and stereochemical control.

CORE 101: Drury Seminar
3 credit hours

This course introduces students to the expectations of academic work at the collegiate level. Particular emphasis lies on developing students’ skills in writing, critical thinking and information literacy. Each course section has its own theme, developed by faculty members from a wide variety of disciplines.

ENGL 207: Expository Writing: Art of the Essay
3 credit hours

Expository writing provides students with valuable opportunities to write in a wide variety of modes of nonfiction, including narrative essays, film and book reviews, cultural analyses and journalistic essays. Students read and discuss published nonfiction and participate in workshops where they respond to one another’s writing in small groups. The workshop format enables students to respond to issues of form, purpose, voice and audience.

MATH 227: Introduction to Statistics
3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  One year of high school algebra. 
A course to acquaint the student with the basic ideas and language of statistics including such topics such as descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, basic experimental design, elementary probability, binomial and normal distributions, estimation and test of hypotheses, and analysis of variance.

MATH 231: Calculus I
4 credit hours

Prerequisite:  Two years of high school algebra and one semester of high school trigonometry. 
A study of the fundamental principles of analytic geometry and calculus with an emphasis on differentiation.

PHYS 211: General Physics I
5 credit hours

Co-requisite:  MATH 231. 
The principles of mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and some topics from atomic and nuclear physics are presented. Calculus and vector analysis are used extensively. Intended for science majors. The workshop format — integrated laboratory and lecture — emphasizes experiment, data collection and analysis, and group work. Three two-hour sessions per week. Offered fall semester.

PHYS 212: General Physics II
5 credit hours

Prerequisite:  PHYS 211. 
The principles of mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and some topics from atomic and nuclear physics are presented. Calculus and vector analysis are used extensively. Intended for science majors. The workshop format — integrated laboratory and lecture — emphasizes experiment, data collection and analysis, and group work. Three two-hour sessions per week. Offered spring semester.

Medical College Admission Test (MCAT)

Additional requirements:
In addition and in order to remain competitive with other medical school applicants, Drury requires that students take a minimum of two upper-level elective courses in the area of their major during their senior year.

The following courses are strongly suggested for science majors: 

BIOL 316: Comparative Anatomy
5 credit hours

Prerequisite:  BIOL 182. 
A critical study of the structural/functional relationships of organs and systems of the vertebrates. Taxonomy, evolutionary relationships and morphological adaptations of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals will be emphasized. Lecture and laboratory.

BIOL 333: Histology
4 credit hours

Prerequisite:  BIOL 181. 
An in?depth look at the microscopic structure of the vertebrate body. Study of cells, tissues and organs will provide an understanding of the complex nature of the relationship between form and function in vertebrates. Lecture and laboratory.

PSYC 356: Biopsychology
3 credit hours

Examines the physiological, ontogenetic and functional foundations of human and animal behavior. Emphasizes central nervous system mechanisms that mediate processes such as arousal and sleep, hunger and satiety, learning and memory, aggression and violence, human psychopathology, and the psychoactive properties of recreational and therapeutic drugs.