Dr. Charles Pettijohn

Associate Professor of Marketing
Office: BRE 100J
cpettijohn002@drury.edu 

Faculty Profile

Please tell us a brief bio of your career – how long have you taught Marketing, what courses do you typically teach, what are your research interests, what is your educational background, etc.
I’ve been teaching marketing and other business courses for MANY years.  During these years, my teaching has included a few management-related courses and virtually ALL courses in the marketing curricula.  However, in the most recent years, the focus has been primarily on the area of sales and sales management.  This course focus has related well to a research focus on sales and sales management.  However, this research has also included a concentration on educational issues and ethics.

In addition to teaching and research, my most recent experience included serving as the first Director of the Huizenga Sales Institute at Nova Southeastern University.  In that role I was responsible for initiating a sales program which included the expansion of the curriculum from a single sales-related course to a total of 14 sales/sales management courses in both the undergraduate and graduate programs.  After less than two years, the program had 341 students enrolled.  Also, this position entailed interacting with the business community in the development of seminars/training programs and in the recruitment of students for available sales positions.

I have an undergraduate degree from Missouri Western State University in Business Administration, a MBA from Missouri State University and a Doctorate in Business Administration from Louisiana Tech University.

Do you have any favorite memories from your recent teaching experiences?
The student culture at Nova Southeastern University was one that had not considered sales as a viable career alternative.  So, in the initial sales classes taught, some students exhibited considerable resistance to the concept of sales as a career and correspondingly resistance to many of the sales strategies discussed in class.  At the conclusion of the program a ‘informal’ graduation ceremony was held and many of these same students had adopted the concepts and the culture necessary to achieve excellence in their upcoming business careers.

What advice would you offer to a new student beginning their course of study in the Breech School of Business?
The advice I would give to students is to realize that the returns they receive from their business studies will be directly related to their investments.  In other words – students should make investments in their educations by reading, studying and truly being engaged in the process.  This includes not only being involved in class, but being involved in extra-curricular activities and networking that will enable them to build a strong foundation that can help them achieve success in their business-related lives for the next 40 years.