Contact:
Dr. Erin Kenny
Director of Women & Gender Studies Minor
Associate Professor of Anthropology
Office: (417) 873-7226
ekenny@drury.edu

Women and Gender Studies Course Descriptions

WGST 101: Introduction to Women and Gender Studies
WGST 371: Women and Gender Studies Thesis Seminar
WGST 397, 398, 497, 498: Internship


Women and Gender Studies Electives:
BIOL 370: Human Sexuality
ECON 335: Poverty and Discrimination
ENGL 300: Single Authors (Women)
ENGL 302: Women Writers
ENGL 317: African-American Literature (Women's)
ENGL 390: Gay Literature
HIST 321: Women in European History
HIST 322: Film and History: Joan of Arc, Myth and Reality
HIST 325: Gender and Culture: East Asia
PHIL 308: History of Women Philosophers
PLSC 341: Homosexuality and Civil Liberties
PLSC 370: Women and Politics
PSYC 352: Psychology of Gender
PSYC 370: Human Sexuality
RELG 308: History of Women Philosophers
SOCI 355: Islam and Women
SOCI 370: Human Sexuality
SPAN 313: These Are Not Sweet Girls: Hispanic Women's Literature
RELG 390: ST: Topics in Religion: From Babylon to Berlin
RELG 390: ST: Women in Early Christianity
RELG 390: ST: Feminist Theologies
RELG 390: ST: African-American Religion in the U.S.
RELG 390: ST: Images of Women in Christian Art (Summer Course, Italy)


WGST 101: Introduction to Women and Gender Studies. 3 hours.
An interdisciplinary analysis of gender from historical and cross-cultural perspectives. This course examines the relevance and impact of gender related issues in terms of historical and contemporary culture. The goal of this course is to help students develop a critical framework for thinking about gender and sexuality, with special attention to issues of class, race, and ethnicity. Topics include birth control, the social construction of beauty, masculinity, and race.

WGST 371: Women and Gender Studies Thesis Seminar. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: 12 hours completed in Women and Gender Studies. Students who have completed all other coursework in the Women's Studies program will be eligible to complete their women's studies thesis project. Students may complete their thesis either in the junior or the senior year. Each student, in working closely with a faculty mentor and with the director of the women's studies program, will select one paper or project the student has completed in one of her or his other women's studies classes. The student will then develop this project as a thesis in Women's Studies. The thesis must exhibit high standards of scholarship and must address a question related to the study of women and/or gender issues. Students participating in the seminar will meet occasionally to share their research with other participants. At the end of the semester, students will present their research in a public forum. Students participating in the Senior Honors Colloquium cannot use their honors theses as their women's studies theses, though students may choose projects that relate to each other. Offered each spring semester.

WGST 397, 398, 497, 498: Internship


BIOL 370: Human Sexuality. 3 hours.
A study of the anatomy and physiology of the female and male reproductive systems, sexually transmitted diseases, methods of contraception, the sexual response cycle, sexual dysfunctions, gender identity, development of sexual orientation, adult sexuality, the development of relationships, cross-cultural comparisons of sexuality and socialization of sex roles. Same as PSYC 370, SOCI 370.

ECON 335: Poverty and Discrimination. 3 hours.

Prerequisite: ECON 201. Extent of poverty and income inequality in U.S. economy is described. Various theories that attempt to explain causes of poverty and inequality are discussed. Existing antipoverty programs are analyzed as are proposals for policy changes.

ENGL 300: Single Authors (Women). 3 hours.


An in-depth study of a single author's literary work. Different authors will be studied. May be repeated when authors vary.

ENGL 302: Women Writers. 3 hours.

A study of British and American literary works written by women. Particular consideration will be given to feminist modes of inquiry and critical thought as well as to the contributions of women in literary scholarship.

ENGL 317: African-American Literature (Women's). 3 hours.

The backgrounds of African-American culture in African and Caribbean literatures as well as the history of black American literature in the 19th and 20th centuries, with focus on gender and the contemporary scene. (Meets Minorities and Indigenous Cultures)

ENGL 390: Selected Topics: Gay Literature. 3 hours.

HIST 321: Women in European History. 3 hours.

Exploration of the lives and voices of European women throughout history and the ideologies that Western society has projected concerning women. Offered fall of evennumbered years.

HIST 322: Film and History: Joan of Arc, Myth and Reality. 3 hours.

This course examines medieval religion, warfare, and women within the context of the late Middle Ages, as well as providing a detailed encounter with the life of Joan of Arc as revealed in the inquisitorial and rehabilitation records. Five films will supplement the critical analysis of the myths and legends that surround the life of Joan of Arc. In what ways are interpretations of historical periods shaped by the camera lens? (Meets Artifacts of Western Culture)

HIST 325: Gender and Culture: East Asia. 3 hours.

This course explores the complex relationships between women and culture in two major civilizations in East Asia:
China and Japan. (Meets Minorities and Indigenous Cultures)

PHIL 308: History of Women Philosophers. 3 hours.

An introduction to women's contributions to the history of philosophical thought. The course moves from ancient Greece through twentieth-century Western Europe and North America. The course considers the methodology and style of women philosophers and examines their reflections on the nature of reality, God, the human person and the human condition, knowledge, freedom and moral responsibility, sexual identity and difference, society, ethics and politics, language and science. Same as RELG 308. (Meets Ideas and Events of Western History)

PLSC 341: Homosexuality and Civil Liberties. 3 hours.

Examination of the rise of the gay and lesbian movement and the challenges of achieving civil liberties and civil rights in dominantly heterosexual western and non-western societies. Same as SOCI 341. (Meets Minorities and Indigenous Cultures)

PLSC 370: Women and Politics. 3 hours.

A study of the role of women as political actors, policy issues affecting women and the role of gender in shaping political attitudes and perceptions; a comparative perspective of women's status in Western and non-Western societies. Offered spring semester of even numbered years. (Meets Minorities and Indigenous Cultures)

PSYC 352: Psychology of Gender. 3 hours.


Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Considers cognitive, personality and social variables as they relate to gender and examines the impact of gender stereotypes and roles in many areas of people's lives.

PSYC 370: Human Sexuality. 3 hours.

A study of the anatomy and physiology of the female and male reproductive systems, sexually transmitted diseases, methods of contraception, the sexual response cycle, sexual dysfunctions, gender identity, development of sexual orientation, adult sexuality, the development of relationships, cross-cultural comparisons of sexuality and socialization of sex roles. Same as BIOL 370, SOCI 370.

RELG 308: History of Women Philosophers. 3 hours.

An introduction to women's contributions to the history of philosophical thought. The course moves from ancient Greece up through twentieth-century Western Europe and North America. The course considers the methodology and style of women philosophers and examines their reflections on the nature of reality, God, the human person and the human condition, knowledge, freedom and moral responsibility, sexual identity and difference, society, ethics and politics, language and science. Same as PHIL 308. (Meets Ideas and Events of Western History)

SOCI 355: Islam and Women. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: GLST 201 or SOCI 101. This course provides an in-depth sociological understanding of the relationship between religion and gender roles in Islam. The course helps students to understand the cultural practices of Islamic society in regards to gender roles. (Meets Minorities and Indigenous Cultures)

SOCI 370: Human Sexuality. 3 hours.
A study of the anatomy and physiology of the female and male reproductive systems, sexually transmitted diseases, methods of contraception, the sexual response cycle, sexual dysfunctions, gender identity, development of sexual orientation, adult sexuality, the development of relationships, cross-cultural comparisons of sexuality and socialization of sex roles. Same as BIOL 370, PSYC 370.

SPAN 313: These Are Not Sweet Girls: Hispanic Women's Literature. 3 hours.
This course investigates issues of power, space and archetypes in the literature written by Hispanic women. Beginning with the first great women writers, this course proceeds chronologically to the 21st century.

RELG 390: Selected Topics. 1-3 hours.