Dr. Hue-Ping Chin

Professor of History
Director of Asian Studies

Office: Burnham Hall, Room 311
Phone: 417-873-7427
Email: hchin@drury.edu

Hue-ping Chin became a full-time faculty member in 1997 after receiving her Ph.D. in History from the University of Iowa.   Her research interests include women’s history, gender and power relations, cross-cultural studies, and globalization.  Her Ph.D. dissertation, Re-figuring Women: Discourse on Gender in China, 1880-1920, examines the evolving discourses on gender relations at the turn of the century in China, emphasizing the multiple paths that shaped the ideology of womanhood.  Her paper, “In Their Own Likeness: Chinese Women and American Missionaries’ Ideal Womanhood”, explores the cross-cultural pollination of the concept of ideal womanhood between American missionaries (both male and female) and the locals.

After joining the faculty at the Center of Interdisciplinary Studies, Hue-ping Chin spent several years working on Interdisciplinary theory and practice, integrating interdisciplinarity into gender studies, history and cultural studies.  She organized the Annual Association of Integrative Studies Conference in 2002 and served on the board of directors at AIS from 2003 - 2005.  Her research projects investigated the complexity of cultural identity, interdisciplinary theory and practice, and the interdisciplinary approach to general education curriculum.  She delivered a series of papers on these issues:  “Conflicting Values: Asian and Western Perspectives on Family, Values and identity”, “Searching for the ‘Self’ at the Cultural Crossroads”,   “From the American Experience to Global Futures: A Model for Reforming General Education”, “A Cross-Cultural Examination of Personal Protest for Social Justice”,  “Interdisciplinary Teaching: From Practice to Theory”,  and “Multiple Voices in a Diverse World: Multiculturalism and General Education”.

Her interest in cross-cultural studies moved her to examine how popular culture shapes one’s identity and its social significance.  Her papers, such as “Social Criticism, Cultural Identity: Miyazaki’s Spirited Away”, “Words and Images: Integrating Film and Cross-cultural Learning”, “Filmmaker as Shaman: Miyazaki’s Myth of Deliverance”,  “Completing an Inner Search for a New Found Identity: Chihiro in Spirited Away”, explore the relationship between narrative and images and the implications of cultural learning and identity shaping.

Hue-ping Chin has been working on several projects since 2006, mostly focusing on East Asia, especially Taiwan, in the context of global-local connection and responses.  Her paper, “Rethinking Democracy: the Democratic Movement in Taiwan”, critiques the democratization movement in Taiwan from 1996 to 2006. Another paper, Sitting on the Moon: Post-partum Care in modern Taiwan”, examines the practice of “zuoyuezi” (a traditional post-partum care) in the era of globalization in Taiwan.  “Foreign Brides and Native Sons: the convergence of globalization” investigates the shifting identity and the forming of new social force in contemporary Taiwan.   Currently, Hue-ping Chin is working on a paper exploring the inherent paradox in China’s “peaceful rising” policy and its implications for the cross-strait relationship.

Hue-ping Chin routinely leads short-term study-abroad programs. In 2005, with Professor Nancy Chikaraishi, she led a study group to Japan for four weeks, teaching History of Modern Japan.  In the summer of 2008, she and Dr. Peter Meidlinger led a group to Greece, teaching “Global Futures”.  She is planning her second Japan program for the summer of 2010.

Hue-ping Chin routinely teaches courses in both the Global Studies Program and History.  The courses taught include: History of Modern China, History of Modern Japan, Gender and Culture: East Asia, Taiwan: the other China, Global Awareness: Asia/Pacific, Global Futures, and the first-year year-long Alpha Seminar: American Experience.  In addition to teaching, Hueping Chin serves as mentor to roughly 30 students, directs the Asian Studies Program, and advises the “Asian Cultures Society”, a student organization.

Education:
B.A., National Cheng-Kung University (Taiwan), 1980
M.A., National Cheng-Chi University (Taiwan), 1983
Ph.D., History, University of Iowa, 1995

Drury University faculty member since 1997
Associate Professor since 2005

Selected Awards:

  • 2008 Faculty Excellence Liberal Learning Award
  • 2008 Nominated for Teaching Excellence Award by the Greek Organizations
  • 2007 Edward Jones Center for Entrepreneurship Faculty Travel Award
  • 2004 Recipient of the Freeman Foundation College-In-Asia Grant
  • 2004 Nominated for the Faculty Leadership Award
  • 2000 Faculty Award for Excellence, Judge Warren White Scholar Program