Environmental Programs Course Descriptions

100 Level Courses:
ENVR 170: Introduction to Environmental Science

200 Level Courses:
ENVR 200: Environmental Geoscience
ENVR 201: Environmental Chemistry
ENVR 210: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing
ENVR 223: Introduction to Meteorology
ENVR 225: Introduction to Environmental Economics

300 Level Courses:
ENVR 305: Air Quality and Pollution Control
ENVR 307: Water Quality and Pollution Control
ENVR 309: Global Environmental Politics
ENVR 312: Advanced Ecology
ENVR 315: Environmental Laws and Regulations
ENVR 316: Environmental Compliance
ENVR 317: Waste Management
ENVR 320: Environmental Ethics
ENVR 321: Hazardous Materials
ENVR 322: American Environmental Politics
ENVR 326: Environmental and Community Health
ENVR 331: Principles of Pollution Prevention and Sustainability
ENVR 333: Psychology of Sustainability
ENVR 335: Sustainability Management: Principles and Practices
ENVR 340: Geography of Food, Agriculture and the Environment
ENVR 344: Toxicology

400 Level Courses:
ENVR 413: Resoruce Management and Planning

ENVR 462: Environmental Health Field Practicum
ENVR 290, 390, 490: Selected Topics
ENVR 391, 392, 491, 492: Research
ENVR 397, 398, 497, 498: Internship


ENVR 170: Introduction to Environmental Science. 3 hours.
This course provides an introduction to the scientific principles that inform environmental problems and solutions. While acknowledging that all environmental problems have their root in cultural and political contexts, this course will focus on the science that we use to explore human impacts on the planet at local and global scales, and the science that informs alternative ways of living on the planet. These principles will be foundational for students who are majoring in Environmental Science, Environmental Health Science and Environmental Studies, so this course will serve as an entry point for majors.

ENVR 200: Environmental Geoscience. 4 hours.
A study of the interrelationship between humans and the physical environment. The course will focus on natural resources, soils, hydrology and water supplies, erosional processes, karst landscapes, land-use planning and geologic map interpretation. Includes laboratory. Field work required. Same as GEOG 200, PHYS 200.

ENVR 201: Environmental Chemistry. 4 hours.
Prerequisites: CHEM 115 and CHEM 115-L or CHEM 238 and CHEM 238-L.
A course with a topics based approach to the chemistry of the environment. Students in this course are expected to have some knowledge of chemistry and a desire to apply this knowledge to the environment. Topics of interest include environmental chemistry of water, water pollution, water treatment, geochemistry, atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, hazardous materials and resources. Three lectures and one laboratory period.  Same as CHEM 201.

ENVR 210: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing. 3 hours.
Prerequisite:  ENVR 170, BIOL 171 or ENVR 220
This course will provide students with a working knowledge of geographic data, data input, data models, spatial analysis, output and the uses of Graphic Information Systems (GIS) in socio-economic and environmental studies.  The course utilizes ESRI (ARCview) software.  Course fee required. Same as GEOG 210, PHYS 210.  

ENVR 223: Introduction to Meteorology. 4 hours.
This course explores the processes that produce weather and climate patterns. Topics of study include earth/sun relationships, global pressure and wind systems, weather forecasting, severe storms and global climate change. Same as GEOG 223.

ENVR 225: Introduction to Environmental Economics. 3 hours.
Economic principles are used to analyze contemporary environmental issues. The impacts of population and economic growth on natural resource depletion are explored.  Same as ECON 225.

ENVR 305: Air Quality and Pollution Control. 3 hours.
Prerequisite:  ENVR 170 or BIOL 171.
This course will cover types of outdoor and indoor air pollutants, their sources, health effects, environmental effects, methods of measurement and control, as well as air quality regulations.  Offered fall semester. 

ENVR 307: Water Quality and Pollution Control. 3 hours.
Prerequisite:  ENVR 170 or BIOL 171.
This course will cover types of water pollution, health effects, environmental effects, methods of measurement and control, as well as water quality regulations.  Offered fall semester. 

ENVR 309: Global Environmental Politics. 3 hours.
From one state’s perspective, many environmental problems are either too big to handle alone (climate change), are caused by other states they cannot control (transboundary air pollution) or concern the loss of environmental goods that belong to the world (depleted international fisheries).  Students will explore these differing types of global environmental challenges by considering the diverse set of relevant actors, interests and institutions operating within and across states.  Same as PLSC 309.

ENVR 312: Advanced Ecology. 4 hours.
Prerequisite:  BIOL 201
A study of ecological principles, focusing on a modern understanding of ecological systems, patterns and processes.  The laboratory will include common field techniques and emphasize experimental design and data analysis. Same as BIOL 312.

ENVR 315: Environmental Laws and Regulations. 3 hours.
An introduction to hazardous waste regulations, solid waste management programs, the Clean Air Act, OSHA regulations, the Clean Water Act, environmental audits, remediation technology, and issues relating to the impact of environmental laws on society.  Offered fall semester.

ENVR 316 Environmental Compliance. 3 hours.
Prerequisite:  ENVR 315.
This course will provide a “next logical step” beyond Environmental Laws and Regulations, and focus on the practical and policy issues, as well as the varying options that may be available for compliance and those laws and regulations.  It is specifically designed in addition to be of particular interest and use to those in the workplace who may currently have or may anticipate having responsibilities in the areas of environmental management and compliance issues. 

ENVR 317: Waste Management. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: ENVR 170 or BIOL 171.
This course will cover sources of solid and hazardous waste, health effects and environmental effects, as well as control methods and regulations. Waste management is a global issue as waste generation increases with population expansion and economic development.  Improperly managed solid waste poses a risk to human health and the environment including contaminating water, attracting insects and rodents, and increasing greenhouse gas emissions which contribute to global climate change.  Offered spring semester. 

ENVR 320: Environmental Ethics. 3 hours.
This course seeks to develop a better understanding of both the factual and ethical dimensions of our current and possible future environments. Explores several contemporary approaches in environmental ethics (including deep ecology, ecofeminism, animal rights, market efficiencies, the loss of biodiversity and responses from deontological, utilitarian and virtue ethics, etc.) and representative theoretical problems (e.g., Aldo Leopold’s “land ethic” vs. natural rights views, ecological holism vs. moral atomism, market efficiency vs. moral obligations, etc.). Using a case-study approach, students then learn to apply different ethical frameworks to several ethical choices occasioned by human interaction with the natural order. Same as PHIL 320

ENVR 321: Hazardous Materials. 3 hours.
Prerequisite:  CHEM 115 and CHEM 115-L; or CHEM 238, CHEM 238-L and ENVR 315.
Provides an in-depth examination of substances classified as hazardous by various agencies and programs including the Department of Transportation, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  The course will explore chemical emergency preparedness, risk assessment, and emergency response planning and training.  This course also qualifies as providing the skills and competencies required for employer certification under OSHA’s Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Rules, 29 CFR 1910.120, and National Fire Protection Association Standards, NFPA 472, for Hazardous Materials Response, Awareness Level. 

ENVR 322 American Environmental Politics. 3 hours.
The creation and enforcement of environmental laws and regulations in the United States can be imagined as the ultimate board game.  It has three overlapping levels (city, state and federal), actors on defense (save our jobs!), referees who interpret the rules (courts and bureaucracy), and actors empowered to change those rules (elected officials).  Understanding this game is vitally important as it determines the quality of the air we breathe, the water we drink and the price we pay for almost everything.  Same as PLSC 322.

ENVR 326: Environmental and Community Health. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: ENVR 170, BIOL 171 or ENVR 220.
This course will examine the relationships between the environment and human health.  Specifically, looking at how our environment affects personal and community health throughout the world.  Offered spring semester.  Same as BIOL 326.

ENVR 331: Principles of Pollution Prevention and Sustainability. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: ENVR 170 or BIOL 171.
This research course focuses on reducing waste at the source and conserving energy. Students will learn the tools and principles of pollution prevention, but they will also apply them to projects at local companies.  The class will work with a local company to assist them in identifying and researching opportunities that will help the company reduce waste, conserve energy and save money.  The relationship between pollution prevention and sustainability will also be addressed.

ENVR 333: Psychology of Sustainability. 3 hours.
An investigation of the connection between human behavior and environmental issues.  Topics will include psychological perspectives on the issues of conservation, ecopsychology, cognition and motivation as they relate to interactions with the natural environment.  Same as PSYC 333.

ENVR 335: Sustainability Management: Principles and Practices. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: ENVR 170 or BIOL 171.
This course will explore the key principles and practices utilized by managers as they work to help organizations make the transition to sustainability.  Through an overview of the major theories underlying sustainability management, an exploration of common practices and utilization of case studies, students will engage with the managerial knowledge and skills needed to assist in the sustainable development of organizations of all type and sizes.

ENVR 340: Geography of Food, Agriculture and the Environment. 3 hours.
Humans use more of our planet’s surface for food production than for any other use.  The oceans also serve as a primary food source.  This class explores how crops and food specialties have developed around the world.  The primary goal of this course it to examine the environmental problems that result from food production and to explore more sustainable options for agriculture, fisheries and wild lands.  The course will include a field trip to a sustainable farm and meetings with federal agricultural professionals.  An additional goal is to gain an appreciation of the regional differences in food by sampling examples of world cuisine.   Offered spring semester. Same as GEOG 340.

ENVR 344: Toxicology. 3 hours.
Prerequisite:  BIOL 200, CHEM 115 and CHEM 115-L; or BIOL 200, CHEM 238 and CHEM 238-L.
This course examines the basic concepts of the effects of toxins on human health, ways toxins are encountered and the consequences for individual and future generations. Methods of treatment also are discussed. Offered spring semester. Same as BIOL 344.

ENVR 413: Resource Management and Planning. 3 hours.
Prerequisite:  ENVR 312 or GEOG 361.
This is a seminar and field course that is designed to provide students with a capstone experience to prepare them for a career or for graduate school.  This course builds on foundational courses in geography and environmental studies and places students in hands-on planning and environmental projects.  Examples of projects include water quality testing and analysis, land use planning, restoration ecology and wildlife conservation.  Projects will be completed in coordination with local, state or federal agencies, private agencies and/or nonprofit agencies.  Students will publish and present their findings in a public setting.  Offered spring semester. Same as GEOG 413.

ENVR 462: Environmental Health Field Practicum. 3-6 hours.
Environmental health majors are required to work 400 hours in an environmental health field.  Students will work on a specific project to reduce adverse impacts on the environment and/or public health.

ENVR 290, 390, 490: Selected Topics. 1-3 hours.

ENVR 391, 392, 491, 492: Research.

ENVR 297, 298, 397, 398, 497, 498: Internship.