Medieval & Renaissance Studies Minor

The medieval and renaissance studies minor requires a minimum of 15 credit hours.

All prerequisites must be completed prior to enrollment in the following courses.

Download the Medieval & Renaissance Studies Minor Advising Sheet (PDF)

Required Core Course

HIST 223: Medieval Europe
3 credit hours

This course provides an introduction to the Middle Ages, examining the multiple influences that shaped European history from the fourth to the fifteenth century. Particular emphasis placed on Christianity, the twelfth-century Renaissance, medieval cities, and society and culture.

Choose a total of 12 hours from at least two different areas:

Art/Architecture

ARTH 310: Medieval Art and Architecture
3 credit hours

An in-depth examination of art and architecture from the collapse of the Roman Empire through the end of the Gothic era. The course covers early Christian, Byzantine, early Medieval, Islamic, Romanesque and Gothic developments.

ARTH 315: Renaissance Art and Architecture
3 credit hours

An in-depth examination of Italian art and architecture from c. 1250 to 1550. The course covers the development of the Renaissance style in Italy from the late Gothic period through the High Renaissance and into the Mannerist period.

ARTH 316: Venice and the Veneto
3 credit hours

This course examines Venetian art and architecture in its cultural context from the city’s foundation through its expansion of territorial domination during the Renaissance, its 19th?century decline and current status as museum city and center for contemporary arts.

ARTH 364: The Printed Book as Art and Artifact, 1450 to 1850
3 credit hours

An introduction to printing history and the history of the book. This course examines the development of printing, including the development of allied arts such as type-cutting and casting, papermaking, bookbinding and illustration. It also seeks to study the cultural contexts of printing and the book, with special emphasis on the rise of a reading public. Students will examine and handle examples from the library’s rare book collection.

ARTH 410: The Medieval Architect: Practice and Product
3 credit hours

This seminar examines the profession of the medieval architect: his training, design procedures and methods of construction employed to transform ideas into built form. Aspects of patronage, material usage and the economy will be considered. This course has been approved as an Honors qualified course.

ARTH 411: Medieval Women: Image, Text, Experience
3 credit hours

This seminar analyzes the history of medieval women from two perspectives: that of the medieval theorists, a primarily masculine tradition informed by misogynistic tendencies, and the reconstructive work of modern social historians and art historians. Through a critical reading of primary (visual and textual) and secondary sources, this course illuminates the multifarious roles women played in medieval society.

ARTH 290, 390, 490: Selected Topics
1-3 credit hours

Selected Topics are courses of an experimental nature that provide students a wide variety of study opportunities and experiences. Selected Topics offer both the department and the students the opportunity to explore areas of special interest in a structured classroom setting. Selected Topics courses (course numbers 290, 390, 490) will have variable titles and vary in credit from 1-3 semester hours. Selected Topic courses may not be taken as a Directed Study offering.

MARC 590: Selected Topics
1-3 credit hours

Selected Topics are courses of an experimental nature that provide students a wide variety of study opportunities and experiences. Selected Topics offer both the department and the students the opportunity to explore areas of special interest in a structured classroom setting. Selected Topics courses (course numbers 290, 390, 490) will have variable titles and vary in credit from 1-3 semester hours. Selected Topic courses may not be taken as a Directed Study offering.

English

ENGL 201: British Literature I: Medieval through Eighteenth Century
3 credit hours

Students discuss canonical texts of early British writing, with particular attention to close-reading and appreciation. The course often pursues a single theme, genre or motif through the readings.

ENGL 305: Studies in Ancient through Medieval Literature
3 credit hours

This course focuses on the literature of ancient and medieval cultures. Themes vary annually and may include “Representing Good and Evil in the Middle Ages” or “Forms of Love in the Middle Ages.” Counts for the Medieval and Renaissance Studies minor when content focuses on the Middle Ages. This course may be repeated when content varies.

ENGL 342: Shakespeare and Ethics
3 credit hours

Students read Shakespeare’s plays with a focus on the moral component of his drama. We ask how Shakespeare understood what it meant to live well, and how he understood good and evil and the problems of achieving moral clarity and moral maturity, in our personal and in our public lives. This course has been approved as an Honors qualified course.

ENGL 290, 390, 490: Selected Topics
1-3 credit hours

Selected Topics are courses of an experimental nature that provide students a wide variety of study opportunities and experiences. Selected Topics offer both the department and the students the opportunity to explore areas of special interest in a structured classroom setting. Selected Topics courses (course numbers 290, 390, 490) will have variable titles and vary in credit from 1-3 semester hours. Selected Topic courses may not be taken as a Directed Study offering.

History

HIST 225: Renaissance and Reformation
3 credit hours

This course provides an introduction to European history from the thirteenth to the seventeenth century, focusing on the Italian Renaissance and the Reformation. The first half of the class examines late medieval society, especially the society, religion and politics of the Italian city-states. The second half examines the reasons for the Reformation, with special emphasis given to the variety of religious reformations in sixteenth-century Europe.

HIST 255: The Black Death
3 credit hours

This course examines the history of the bubonic plague and other contagions, focusing particularly on the Black Death of 1347 to 1351. Through the use of the course’s thematic material, students will be introduced to the basic skills used by historians in their investigation of the past, including a close reading and contextualization of primary source texts, the study of historical interpretations and controversies, citation and research methods, effective writing techniques and oral communication skills.

HIST 273: Rome, the City: Ancient to Renaissance
3 credit hours

An introduction to the art, architecture and the history of Rome to 1650. Site visits focus on ancient Roman monuments, early Christian symbolism, medieval churches and the centrality of Rome as a Christian center from Peter to the papacy. Offered as a study abroad course.

HIST 322: Joan of Arc: Film and History
3 credit hours

Through an examination of trial records and documents, this course examines the life of the peasant Joan of Arc, one of the most popular figures in history. Additional focus on the context of the Middle Ages as well as myth-making and representations in literature, art, film and propaganda. In what ways are historical interpretations shaped by popular culture and cultural biases about the past? How has Joan remained an important cultural construction long after her death?

HIST 342: The European Witch Hunts
3 credit hours

This course examines the witch?hunts in Early Modern Europe. To understand the historical context, the course examines magic, heresy, witch?hunts and the shifting definitions in the late Middle Ages. Primary sources highlight the words of the accused and the accusers. Additional foci include the popular modern myths associated with the witch-hunts, as well as examination of modern witch-hunts. This course has been approved as an Honors qualified course.

HIST 290, 390, 490: Selected Topics
1-3 credit hours

Selected Topics are courses of an experimental nature that provide students a wide variety of study opportunities and experiences. Selected Topics offer both the department and the students the opportunity to explore areas of special interest in a structured classroom setting. Selected Topics courses (course numbers 290, 390, 490) will have variable titles and vary in credit from 1-3 semester hours. Selected Topic courses may not be taken as a Directed Study offering.

Language

FREN 351: Introduction to French Literature I
3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  FREN 202. 
Literature in French from the Middle Ages to 1650. Major literary works of this period are read and discussed in French from a critical perspective. This course has been approved as an Honors qualified course.

Library & Information Services

ARTH 364: The Printed Book as Art and Artifact, 1450 to 1850
3 credit hours

An introduction to printing history and the history of the book. This course examines the development of printing, including the development of allied arts such as type-cutting and casting, papermaking, bookbinding and illustration. It also seeks to study the cultural contexts of printing and the book, with special emphasis on the rise of a reading public. Students will examine and handle examples from the library’s rare book collection.

Philosophy/Religion

PHIL 290, 390, 490: Selected Topics
1-3 credit hours

Selected Topics are courses of an experimental nature that provide students a wide variety of study opportunities and experiences. Selected Topics offer both the department and the students the opportunity to explore areas of special interest in a structured classroom setting. Selected Topics courses (course numbers 290, 390, 490) will have variable titles and vary in credit from 1-3 semester hours. Selected Topic courses may not be taken as a Directed Study offering.

RELG 290, 390, 490: Selected Topics
1-3 credit hours

Selected Topics are courses of an experimental nature that provide students a wide variety of study opportunities and experiences. Selected Topics offer both the department and the students the opportunity to explore areas of special interest in a structured classroom setting. Selected Topics courses (course numbers 290, 390, 490) will have variable titles and vary in credit from 1-3 semester hours. Selected Topic courses may not be taken as a Directed Study offering.

Independent Research

ARCH 291, 292, 391, 392, 491, 492: Research
1-12 credit hours

Many academic departments offer special research or investigative projects beyond the regular catalog offering. Significant responsibility lies with the student to work independently to develop a proposal for study that must be approved by a faculty mentor and the appropriate department chair. The faculty member will provide counsel through the study and will evaluate the student’s performance. Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible. Students must register for research (291, 292, 391, 392, 491 or 492) to receive credit and are required to fill out a Permission to Register for Special Coursework form. It is recommended that students complete not more than 12 hours of research to apply toward the baccalaureate degree.

ARTH 291, 292, 391, 392, 491, 492: Research
1-12 credit hours

Many academic departments offer special research or investigative projects beyond the regular catalog offering. Significant responsibility lies with the student to work independently to develop a proposal for study that must be approved by a faculty mentor and the appropriate department chair. The faculty member will provide counsel through the study and will evaluate the student’s performance. Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible. Students must register for research (291, 292, 391, 392, 491 or 492) to receive credit and are required to fill out a Permission to Register for Special Coursework form. It is recommended that students complete not more than 12 hours of research to apply toward the baccalaureate degree.

ENGL 291, 292, 391, 392, 491, 492: Research
1-12 credit hours

Many academic departments offer special research or investigative projects beyond the regular catalog offering. Significant responsibility lies with the student to work independently to develop a proposal for study that must be approved by a faculty mentor and the appropriate department chair. The faculty member will provide counsel through the study and will evaluate the student’s performance. Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible. Students must register for research (291, 292, 391, 392, 491 or 492) to receive credit and are required to fill out a Permission to Register for Special Coursework form. It is recommended that students complete not more than 12 hours of research to apply toward the baccalaureate degree.

HIST 291, 292, 391, 392, 491, 492: Research
1-12 credit hours

Many academic departments offer special research or investigative projects beyond the regular catalog offering. Significant responsibility lies with the student to work independently to develop a proposal for study that must be approved by a faculty mentor and the appropriate department chair. The faculty member will provide counsel through the study and will evaluate the student’s performance. Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible. Students must register for research (291, 292, 391, 392, 491 or 492) to receive credit and are required to fill out a Permission to Register for Special Coursework form. It is recommended that students complete not more than 12 hours of research to apply toward the baccalaureate degree.

PHIL 391, 392, 491, 492: Research
1-12 credit hours

Many academic departments offer special research or investigative projects beyond the regular catalog offering. Significant responsibility lies with the student to work independently to develop a proposal for study that must be approved by a faculty mentor and the appropriate department chair. The faculty member will provide counsel through the study and will evaluate the student’s performance. Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible. Students must register for research (291, 292, 391, 392, 491 or 492) to receive credit and are required to fill out a Permission to Register for Special Coursework form. It is recommended that students complete not more than 12 hours of research to apply toward the baccalaureate degree.

RELG 391, 392, 491, 492: Research
1-12 credit hours

Many academic departments offer special research or investigative projects beyond the regular catalog offering. Significant responsibility lies with the student to work independently to develop a proposal for study that must be approved by a faculty mentor and the appropriate department chair. The faculty member will provide counsel through the study and will evaluate the student’s performance. Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible. Students must register for research (291, 292, 391, 392, 491 or 492) to receive credit and are required to fill out a Permission to Register for Special Coursework form. It is recommended that students complete not more than 12 hours of research to apply toward the baccalaureate degree.

HNRS 401: Senior Colloquium and Research
3 credit hours

200-level courses and one 300-level course in the honors program. Working with a mentor, students develop a plan for individualized research, in-depth, into a subject of their interest. The senior colloquium meets weekly to discuss the research projects and to provide a community of scholars who can assist and support each other. During the second semester, students present their research papers to the colloquium for discussion and debate, thus entering the great conversations of our tradition. The papers must exhibit high standards of scholarship and they must illuminate the subject in its historical context and social significance. Evaluation is made by the honors committee.

(Prerequisite for Research is at least 9 hours of Medieval and Renaissance Studies coursework.)

Study Abroad

Study abroad is encouraged. Please check with the program director for consideration.

Selected topics should be confirmed with the director of medieval and renaissance studies for consideration as minor credit.