Meador Center Hosts Trump at 100 Days

Please join us Thursday, April 27 at 5:30 p.m. in the Diversity Center on Drury’s campus for a discussion on “Trump at 100 Days.”  We will hear from five eminent scholars of American politics, who will give us a quick set of reflections and then we will engage in conversation.  This is the final event in this year’s “45 Series: Conversations on the 2016 Presidential Election and the New Administration.” 

Julia Azari

Associate Professor of Political Science at Marquette University, received her Ph.D. from Yale University.  She is the author of numerous publications, including  Delivering the People’s Message: The Changing Politics of the Presidential Mandate(Cornell University Press), and co-editor of The Presidential Leadership Dilemma: Between the Constitution and a Political Party(SUNY Press).  Julia is a regular contributor at the political science blog The Mischiefs of Faction, as well as Vox and fivethirtyeight.com.  Her work has also appeared in the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog and in Politico.  

Karen M. Hult

Chair of the Department and Professor of Political Science at Virginia Tech University.  She received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota.  Recognized as one of the foremost experts on the inner workings of the White House, Karen is the author of Agency Merger and Bureaucratic Design (University of Pittsburgh Press), Governing the White House: From Hoover Through LBJ (with Charles E. Walcott), which won the 1996 Richard E. Neustadt Prize honoring the best book on the presidency, awarded by the Presidency Research Group of the American Political Science Association (APSA); and Empowering the White House: Governance under Nixon, Ford, and Carter (with Charles E. Walcott).  She has also authored numerous book chapters and essays, as well as articles in such journals as the American Journal of Political Science, Presidential Studies Quarterly, and others.  She is the past president of the Presidency Research Group (now Presidency and Executive Politics) of the APSA, and in 2012 she received the Career Service Award from the Presidency and Executive Politics section, which is “given every fourth (presidential election) year to recognize the body of significant research produced by a scholar of the Presidency and Executive Politics who has been active in promoting the field by contributing to the Presidency and Executive Politics section and to APSA."  

Frances E. Lee 

Professor of Government at the University of Maryland.  She received her Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University.  Frances is widely considered one of the leading experts on congressional politics.  She has received numerous accolades and honors, including the American Political Science Association's Richard F. Fenno Award for the best book on legislative politics in 2009, the D. B. Hardeman Award presented by the Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation for the best book on a congressional topic in both 1999 and 2009, and the APSA's E. E. Schattschneider Award for the best dissertation in American Politics in 1997.  She has been a Fellow at the Brookings Institution, and served as a Congressional Fellow.  Among her many books are Insecure Majorities: Congress and the Perpetual Campaign; Beyond Ideology: Politics, Principles and Partisanship in the U.S. Senate, and Sizing Up the Senate: The Unequal Consequences of Equal Representation, all from the University of Chicago Press.  Her research has appeared in the profession’s top journals, including the American Political Science Review, Journal of Politics, and American Journal of Political Science.  Frances currently co-edits Legislative Studies Quarterly.

Andrew Rudalevige

The Thomas Brackett Reed Professor of Government at Bowdoin College.  He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University.  Andrew is the current president of the APSA’s organized section on the Presidency and Executive Politics.  He has published numerous articles, essays, and book chapters, and has contributed to the blog The Monkey Cage.  His books include, among others, Managing the President’s Program: Presidential Leadership and Legislative Policy Formulation (Princeton University Press), which was the winner of the 2003 Richard E. Neustadt Prize honoring the best book on the presidency, awarded by the Presidency Research Group of the American Political Science Association, and The New Imperial Presidency: Renewing Presidential Power after Watergate (U of Michigan Press).  He is currently engaged in a large-scale study of unilateral powers in the presidency.

Charles E. Walcott 

Professor Emeritus at Virginia Tech.  He received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Santa Barbara.  Charles has won several teaching and research awards, including the Richard E. Neustadt Prize honoring the best book on the presidency, awarded by the Presidency Research Group of the APSA for Governing the White House: From Hoover to LBJ (with Karen M. Hult).  He has also written Governing Public Organizations and Empowering the White House, also with Professor Hult. His research and writings have been published in a variety of outlets including the American Journal of Political Science, Presidential Studies Quarterly, and elsewhere.  He has served as President of the Presidency and Executive Politics organized section of APSA, and was co-editor of the journal Congress and the Presidency.  He has contributed numerous articles and essays on the structures of the White House, and he and Hult contributed “Influences on Presidential Decision Making," to The Oxford Handbook of the American Presidency (Oxford University Press, 2009).