Pre-Engineering Minor

The minor in pre-engineering prepares students for further study in the profession of engineering and supports the development of liberally educated engineers who are better prepared to address significant societal problems through the field of engineering.

The pre-engineering minor requires a minimum of 34 credit hours.

All prerequisites must be completed prior to enrollment in the following courses.

CHEM 238: Inorganic Chemistry
3 credit hours

A fundamental course in the study of inorganic chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, nomenclature of inorganic compounds, fundamentals of inorganic complexes and an introduction to the chemistry of main group elements.

CHEM 238-L: Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
1 credit hours

A fundamental laboratory course in the study of inorganic chemistry. Topics include the preparation of inorganic complexes, resolution of chiral transition metal compounds, ion conductivity and a preparation of a main group inorganic compound.

CSCI 251: Introduction to Computer Science
4 credit hours

Prerequisite:  Two years of high school algebra. 
An introduction to computer science through applications such as media. A major component is programming design and development using a language such as Python or Java. A disciplined approach to problem solving methods and algorithm development will be stressed using top-down design and stepwise refinement. Topics included are syntax and semantics, I/O, control structures, modularity, data types, and object-oriented programming.

MATH 231: Calculus I
4 credit hours

Prerequisite:  Two years of high school algebra and one semester of high school trigonometry. 
A study of the fundamental principles of analytic geometry and calculus with an emphasis on differentiation.

MATH 232: Calculus II
4 credit hours

Prerequisite:  MATH 231 or MATH 236. It is recommended that students receive a grade of C or better in MATH 231 or MATH 236 to be successful in this course. 
Continuation of Calculus I including techniques of integration and infinite series.

MATH 233: Calculus III
4 credit hours

Prerequisite:  MATH 232. It is recommended that students receive a grade of C or better in MATH 231 to be successful in this course. 
Functions of two variables, partial differentiation, applications of multiple integrals to areas and volumes, line and surface integrals, and vectors.

MATH 366: Differential Equations
3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  MATH 232
A first course in ordinary differential equations.

PHYS 211: General Physics I
4 credit hours

Co-requisite:  MATH 231. 
The principles of Newtonian mechanics including motion, energy, and force. Calculus with extensive use of vector analysis. Intended for science majors. The modeling-centered, inquiry-based workshop format — integrated laboratory and lecture — emphasizes experiment, data collection and analysis, problem solving, and cooperative learning in both small and large groups. Three two-hour sessions per week. Offered fall semester.

PHYS 212: General Physics II
4 credit hours

Prerequisite:  PHYS 211. 
Continuation of Newtonian mechanics, including working, 2-d motion, impulse-momentum, and circular motion. Also electrical and magnetic properties of matter, fields and forces, and DC circuits. Calculus with extensive use of vector analysis. Intended for science majors. The modeling-centered, inquiry-based workshop format — integrated laboratory and lecture — emphasizes experiment, data collection and analysis, problem solving, and cooperative learning in both small and large groups. Three two-hour sessions per week. Offered spring semester.

Choose one of the following (3 hrs.)

COMM 211: Presentational Speaking
3 credit hours

Principles and practice of effective oral communication. This course focuses on researching, composing and delivering formal and informal presentations. Topics include ethics and public speaking, listening, research, analyzing and adapting to audiences, message construction, outlining, delivery of message, effective use of visual aids and critically evaluating public address. The course emphasizes informative and persuasive speaking. Designed for students who seek speaking and critical thinking skills.

ENGL 207: Expository Writing: Art of the Essay
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: DAY-None.
CCPS-ENGL 150.

Expository writing provides students with valuable opportunities to write in a wide variety of modes of nonfiction, including narrative essays, film and book reviews, cultural analyses and journalistic essays. Students read and discuss published nonfiction and participate in workshops where they respond to one another’s writing in small groups. The workshop format enables students to respond to issues of form, purpose, voice and audience.