Pre-Engineering Dual Degree Program Curriculum

Drury University cooperates with Washington University in a dual-degree program leading to an undergraduate degree in a liberal arts major and in engineering. Participants commonly follow either a ‘3-2’ or ‘4-2’ schedule, entering Washington University after their junior or senior year at Drury (students who follow a 4-2 schedule must apply no later than one year after graduation). Those who meet the admissions requirements should be able to earn both a Drury degree and an engineering degree with four semesters of study after Drury.

Washington University also offers a ‘3-3’ or ‘4-3’ program leading to a Drury B.A., and a B.S. and M.S. in Engineering from Washington University. Students complete the same coursework as listed below while at Drury, and then move to Washington University for three years of study.

Dual-degree study is an attractive alternative to traditional engineering curricula, which are highly structured and may require longer than four years to complete. Graduates of dual-degree programs are liberally educated engineers, possessing strong communication and problem-solving skills, a broad background in humanities, social sciences and the global environment as well as a quality technical education. They are well prepared to advance in technical management and to play major roles in solving increasingly complex societal problems in engineering, consulting, design, and other areas.

Students must complete the following core math and science courses:

Chemistry

CHEM 238: Inorganic Chemistry
3 credit hours

A fundamental course in the study of inorganic chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, nomenclature of inorganic compounds, fundamentals of inorganic complexes and an introduction to the chemistry of main group elements.

CHEM 238-L: Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory
1 credit hours

A fundamental laboratory course in the study of inorganic chemistry. Topics include the preparation of inorganic complexes, resolution of chiral transition metal compounds, ion conductivity and a preparation of a main group inorganic compound.

Math 

MATH 231: Calculus I
4 credit hours

Prerequisite:  Two years of high school algebra and one semester of high school trigonometry. 
A study of the fundamental principles of analytic geometry and calculus with an emphasis on differentiation.

MATH 232: Calculus II
4 credit hours

Prerequisite:  MATH 231 or MATH 236. It is recommended that students receive a grade of C or better in MATH 231 or MATH 236 to be successful in this course. 
Continuation of Calculus I including techniques of integration and infinite series.

MATH 233: Calculus III
4 credit hours

Prerequisite:  MATH 232. It is recommended that students receive a grade of C or better in MATH 231 to be successful in this course. 
Functions of two variables, partial differentiation, applications of multiple integrals to areas and volumes, line and surface integrals, and vectors.

MATH 366: Differential Equations
3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  MATH 232
A first course in ordinary differential equations.

Physics

PHYS 211: General Physics I
5 credit hours

Co-requisite:  MATH 231. 
The principles of Newtonian mechanics including motion, energy, and force. Calculus with extensive use of vector analysis. Intended for science majors. The modeling-centered, inquiry-based workshop format integrated laboratory and lecture emphasizes experiment, data collection and analysis, problem solving, and cooperative learning in both small and large groups. Three two-hour sessions per week. Offered fall semester.

PHYS 212: General Physics II
5 credit hours

Prerequisite:  PHYS 211. 
Continuation of Newtonian mechanics, including working, 2-d motion, impulse-momentum, and circular motion. Also electrical and magnetic properties of matter, fields and forces, and DC circuits. Calculus with extensive use of vector analysis. Intended for science majors. The modeling-centered, inquiry-based workshop format integrated laboratory and lecture emphasizes experiment, data collection and analysis, problem solving, and cooperative learning in both small and large groups. Three two-hour sessions per week. Offered spring semester.


Those interested in Biomedical Engineering should also complete the following additional coursework and should consult the program director.

BIOL 172: Exploring Molecular Biology
3 credit hours

Recommended prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 115 or CHEM 238
This course examines the structure and function of nucleic acids and proteins. The molecular mechanisms of replication, transcription, mRNA processing and translation will be emphasized. In addition, regulation of these processes will be explored. Lecture and laboratory. Intended for students majoring in biology or related disciplines.

BIOL 181: Mechanisms of Genetic Inheritance
3 credit hours

Prerequisite:  BIOL 172
This course will apply the knowledge acquired in BIOL 172 to the inheritance patterns of genetic traits between individuals and within populations. Lecture and laboratory.

CHEM 208: Analytical Chemistry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 238.
A lecture course that covers analytical methods of chemical analysis. Topics include statistical analysis, quantitative chemical analysis, chemical equilibria, eletroanalytical techniques and fundamentals of spectroscopy.

CHEM 208-L: Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
1 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 238-L
A laboratory course designed to give students experiences with analytical methods of chemical analysis. Topics include data analysis, chemical equilibria (acid-base and complexation), redox titrations and spectroscopy.


Those interested in Chemical Engineering should also complete the following additional coursework and should consult the program director.

BIOL 172: Exploring Molecular Biology
3 credit hours

Recommended prerequisite or co-requisite: CHEM 115 or CHEM 238
This course examines the structure and function of nucleic acids and proteins. The molecular mechanisms of replication, transcription, mRNA processing and translation will be emphasized. In addition, regulation of these processes will be explored. Lecture and laboratory. Intended for students majoring in biology or related disciplines.

CHEM 208: Analytical Chemistry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 238.
A lecture course that covers analytical methods of chemical analysis. Topics include statistical analysis, quantitative chemical analysis, chemical equilibria, eletroanalytical techniques and fundamentals of spectroscopy.

CHEM 208-L: Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
1 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 238-L
A laboratory course designed to give students experiences with analytical methods of chemical analysis. Topics include data analysis, chemical equilibria (acid-base and complexation), redox titrations and spectroscopy.

And either

CHEM 315: Organic Chemistry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 238
This lecture course is an in-depth study of organic functional group chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, aromatics and alcohols. Topics include nomenclature, stereochemistry, mechanisms, and theory.

CHEM 315-L: Organic Chemistry Laboratory
2 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 238-L
This laboratory course has a 1?hour lecture component that introduces the lab and complements CHEM 315. It develops organic lab skills and techniques with extensive hands?on experience and organic application of spectroscopy and instrumentation

CHEM 415: Advanced Organic Chemistry
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 315.  
This lecture course continues in-depth study of organic functional group chemistry of carbonyl containing compounds and amines. Topics include spectroscopy, mechanisms, theory and an introduction to biochemistry and metabolic pathways.

CHEM 415-L: Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory
2 credit hours

Prerequisite:  CHEM 315-L or CHEM 312-L.  
A laboratory course has a 1?hour lecture component that introduces the lab and complements CHEM 415. It continues development of organic lab skills and techniques. Topics covered will include multi-step synthesis, open- ended projects involving experimental design and an introduction to enzyme catalysis and stereochemical control.

Or

CHEM 312: Organic Chemistry Reactions
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 238. 
This lecture course studies the chemistry of all major organic functional groups in one semester. Topics include nomenclature, stereochemistry and some mechanisms and theory. Emphasis is placed on the reactions and their application in synthesis.

CHEM 312-L: Organic Chemistry Reactions Lab
2 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 238-L
This laboratory course has a 1?hour lecture component that introduces the lab and complements CHEM 312. It develops organic lab skills and techniques through organic reaction experiments and applications of spectroscopy and instrumentation.

CHEM 412: Advanced Organic Chemistry Reactions
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: CHEM 312
This lecture course is an advanced study in the chemistry of all major organic functional groups. Topics include spectroscopy, in-depth theory and reaction mechanisms and an introduction to biochemistry and metabolic pathways


Those interested in Chemical Engineering  should also complete the following additional coursework and should consult the program director.

CSCI 261: Data Structures
4 credit hours

Prerequisite: CSCI 251. Students must receive a grade of C or better in the prerequisites.
An in-depth study of data structures, including arrays, records, stacks, queues, lists, trees, heaps and hash tables. The study includes the definition, specification, and implementation of these structures, as well as examples of their uses. Also included is an introduction to the internal representation of information.


Each program also requires completion of the Drury CORE curriculum (typically completed by Drury students by the end of their junior year), as well as electives to complete a major. Those who enter at the end of their junior year must apply for a waiver of the senior residency requirement and typically transfer credit back to Drury to fulfill the 124 hours needed for graduation. Students also must meet Drury’s requirements for entry to pre-professional programs (see Pre-Professional Programs on page 36 for more information).

For admission to Washington University, an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher is required, as well as a 3.25 GPA in math and science. Applicants with lower GPAs are considered on a case-by-case basis.

Students who have completed the prerequisite courses, meet the GPA guidelines and are recommended by the Drury program director are invited to apply for engineering study at Washington University. Applications should typically be submitted by February 28 for admission in the fall.