Drop-Off Contests

Drop Off (72-Hour) Format:  All 72-hour entries must be in Quicktime format and submitted on a flash drive. The ONLY file on that flash drive must be the entry. Only one entry per drive allowed. Labels will be provided for the drives. All drives will be returned. Entries not in Quicktime format will not be included in the screener room.

The 72-Hour Challenge

Clock Start: 8:00 a.m. Wednesday, October 30
Deadline: 9:00 a.m. Saturday, November 2

SCHOOLS MAY ENTER AS MANY TEAMS AS THEY WANT IN THE DROP OFF CONFERENCE CONTESTS, BUT STUDENTS MAY ONLY BE ON ONE TEAM


MOVIE MAKER VIDEO CHALLENGE

  • When the 72-hour clock starts, all "Movie Maker" teams will receive scripts and directions. The contest will call for a finished product that runs no longer than the time limit below. Opening titles and closing credits count against that time limit.(Actors can be anyone the team wants to use) NOTE: No copyrighted material may be used. All music and visuals must be original, and recorded during the contest. However, music from school-owned libraries is allowed as long as the school has copyright permission. No file footage of any kind. Time Limit: 6 minutes

  • JUDGES will look for: Movies that tell a strong story, with appropriate pacing, cinematography, lighting, sound, dialogue, editing, and a definite beginning/middle/end.

MUSIC VIDEO CHALLENGE

  • No romance or love stories allowed in this contest per judge request. 

  • When the 72-hour clock starts, teams will receive a link to a collection of music tracks and lyrics from the DU Uncut Music Catalogue. Teams must choose one song for which they will make a music video. They will drop off their finished music video by the 72-hour deadline listed above. Time Limit: No more than 1:00 minute longer than the song. Example: If the song is 3:00 minutes long then the video can not exceed 4:00 minutes.

  • JUDGES will look for videos that utilize storytelling techniques, strong editing and visuals, compelling angles or approaches, and videos that fit the music they are illustrating or interpreting.

MULTIMEDIA JOURNALISM CHALLENGE

The Rules

  • When the 72-Hour clock starts, teams will receive an e-mail containing their topic.  Entries must be journalistic in nature, and all footage must be shot, written and edited during the 72 hours of the event. NO file footage, NO copyrighted material of any kind, is allowed.

  • JUDGES will look for entries that concentrate on strong storytelling while sticking to the theme and/or directives provided in the contest packet. The quality of the visuals, audio, editing, writing, reporting, plus the overall impact of the entry will help judges determine the winners. Schools are reminded to avoid "inside" stories about staff members or anyone connected with your broadcast program. The staff should not have previously covered the topics and characters covered for this production. 

The Requirements

  • This year, this contest will not require a show. Instead, we are looking for comprehensive coverage of the provided topic in the form of a convergence webpage.  This will require the following:

    • A URL submitted by 9 a.m. on Nov. 2 that our judges can visit to evaluate your coverage. This can be a blog site, or any kind of web page where the required elements can be displayed.  If you have a webpage already, you can adapt it for this contest, or you can start fresh. 

    • Your page must include at least two print articles with photos and at least one photo gallery, two video packages, and any other elements you wish to include to demonstrate your complete coverage and understanding of the topic.  If you need free video hosting, we suggest you look at Schooltube.com or Vimeo.  You can also use Youtube if you want.  Our judges will not be blocked from any of those. 

    • Your target audience for this event:  Teenagers in your city/town.

Special Reminders

  • The judges will give some consideration to the appearance and organization of the webpage you submit, but those elements will not be considered more important than the actual journalistic content you create.  Do not spend too much time or energy working on a slick, state-of-the-art appearance while sacrificing strong reporting that thoroughly covers the topic.

STUDENTS WHO PARTICIPATE IN THE PRE-CONVENTION CONTESTS MAY ALSO ENTER AN ON-SITE CONTEST. GOOD LUCK!