Contact:
Dr. Jeffrey VanDenBerg
Chair of Political Science & Geography
Professor of Political Science
Office: (417) 873-6947
jvandenb@drury.edu


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Political Science Course Descriptions

100 Level Courses:

PLSC 101: Government and Politics in the United States
PLSC 150: Beyond the Headlines: Tools for Engaging the Political World
PLSC 151: Introduction to Comparative Politics
PLSC 152: Introduction to International Relations
PLSC 153: Introduction to Political Theory

200 Level Courses:
PLSC 200: Introduction to International Development Aid
PLSC 220: Introduction to Law and Society
PLSC 250: Introduction to Political Inquiry

300 Level Courses:
PLSC 300: Model United Nations
PLSC 302: U.S. Foreign Policy
PLSC 307: Globalization, Politics and Justice
PLSC 309: Global Environmental Politics
PLSC 312: Islam and the West
PLSC 322: American Environmental Politics
PLSC 332: Political Parties, Elections and Interest Groups
PLSC 335: The Supreme Court and Constitutional Law
PLSC 337: United States Congress
PLSC 338: United States Presidency
PLSC 339: Politics in Popular Culture
PLSC 350: International Organizations and Law
PLSC 354: Politics and Culture in Europe
PLSC 357: The Politics of North America: Canada, Mexico and the United States
PLSC 360: Islam and Politics in the Modern Middle East
PLSC 365: Egypt and the Third World
PLSC 366: Washington Center: Studies in International Relations
PLSC 367: Washington Center: Studies in Comparative Politics
PLSC 368: Washington Center: Studies in American Politics
PLSC 370: Women and Politics
PLSC 375: Arab-Israeli Conflict
PLSC 380: Western Political Thought
PLSC 382: Constitutionalism and The Separation of Powers
PLSC 383: American Social and Political Thought
PLSC 384: Political Liberalism and Justice
PLSC 386: Political Theory of the Federalist Papers

400 Level Courses:
PLSC 442: Rhetorical Criticism
PLSC 494: Senior Research Seminar
PLSC 290, 390, 490: Selected Topics. 1-3 hours.
PLSC 291, 292, 391, 392, 491, 492: Research.
PLSC 397, 398, 497, 498: Internship.


PLSC 101: Government and Politics in the United States. 3 hours.
Introduction to the theories, constitutional bases, functions and government structures of the U.S. political system in relation to the global political environment. Emphasis on national politics and linkages with state, local and international governments, including an emphasis on Missouri and current issues in domestic and foreign policy.

PLSC 150: Beyond the Headlines: Tools for Engaging the Political World. 3 hours.
Through the study of current events, this class introduces the tools political scientists use to analyze politics beyond the headlines. It focuses on developing essential skills in writing, information literacy, forming hypotheses and research questions and oral communication.

PLSC 151: Introduction to Comparative Politics. 3 hours.
Introduction to the comparison of different political systems with an examination of liberal democratic societies, communist and post-communist systems, and developing nations with case studies from each category.

PLSC 152: Introduction to International Relations. 3 hours.
A study of the historical background and contemporary organization of the international political system and the world economy.

PLSC 153 Introduction to Political Theory. 3 hours.
An introduction to the key principles of political theory and political philosophy, including discussion of the issues of political authority, justification of the state, social contract theories and the role of consent, liberal democracy, rights and justice, civil disobedience, race and gender, and justice in a global setting. Some attention also will be paid to how political theory can be applied to other areas of inquiry, such as the debate about civil society, the discussion of ethnicity and cultural conflict and on the idea of democracy in an international setting.

PLSC 200 Introduction to International Development and Aid. 3 hours.
An examination of the concepts and issues of globalization and development, including a study of the roles of the state, multilateral agencies, philanthropies and community organizations in the contemporary world. Same as ANTH 200.

PLSC 220 Introduction to Law and Society. 3 hours.
An exploration of the role that law plays in organizing society, resolving disputes and fostering change.  Students will focus on the multitudinous ways in which law influences their daily lives and how social groups work to change the law and improve society.  Students will be introduced to theories about law and how law has developed over time.

PLSC 250: Introduction to Political Inquiry. 3 hours.
Introduction to the process and techniques of research in political science. Emphasis is on research design, theory, hypothesis generation, probability and quantitative analysis, including nominal and ordinal data, univariate statistics, correlation and bivariate and multiple regression. This course is a prerequisite for Senior Seminar.

PLSC 300: Midwest Model United Nations. 1 hour.
In-depth role playing that leads to an understanding of the United Nations, the relationships among countries and methods of resolving conflict; preparation for the annual MMUN simulation in St. Louis. Participants must enroll for both fall and spring semesters. Course may be repeated for credit.

PLSC 302: U.S. Foreign Policy. 3 hours.
Examination of foreign policy in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, with analysis of the U.S. foreign policy-making process, institutions and actors.

PLSC 307 Globalization, Politics and Justice. 3 hours.
An examination of globalization, its history, its contemporary rise and its effects on the world today.  Students will consider how globalization transforms politics and affects economic and social justice.

PLSC 309: Global Environmental Politics. 3 hours.
From one state’s perspective, many environmental problems are either too big to handle alone (climate change), are caused by other states they cannot control (transboundary air pollution) or concern the loss of environmental goods that belong to the world (depleted international fisheries).  Students will explore these differing types of global environmental challenges by considering the diverse set of relevant actors, interests and institutions operating within and across states.   Same as ENVR 309.

PLSC 312: Islam and the West. 3 hours.
Examination of the historical, cultural, religious, economic and political interactions between the Western and Islamic worlds.  Focuses on the place of Muslims in Europe, especially questions the identity and politics.  Offered as a study abroad course.

PLSC 322: American Environmental Politics. 3 hours.
The creation and enforcement of environmental laws and regulations in the United States can be imagined as the ultimate board game.  It has three overlapping levels (city, state and federal), actors on defense (save our jobs!), referees who interpret the rules (courts and bureaucracy), and actors empowered to change those rules (elected officials).  Understanding this game is vitally important as it determines the quality of the air we breathe, the water we drink and the price we pay for almost everything.  Same as ENVR 322.

PLSC 332: Political Parties, Elections and Interest Groups. 3 hours.
An examination of the history, evolution and current structures of American political parties, elections and interest groups.  This course is offered every two years in conjunction with national elections and allows students hands-on experience in the study of American electoral politics.

PLSC 335: The Supreme Court and Constitutional Law. 3 hours.
A study of judicial processes and decisions with particular emphasis on the Supreme Court decisions that have shaped legal thought and altered the social fabric of American society.

PLSC 337: United States Congress. 3 hours.
An examination of how the U.S. Congress functions in the American political system with a focus on the sources of power, the process of formulating legislation and the people and groups who participate in the legislative process.

PLSC 338: United States Presidency. 3 hours.
Examination of the U.S. Presidency in the American political system with a focus on the sources of power, institutions, functions and problems.

PLSC 339: Politics in Popular Culture. 3 hours.
An in-depth examination of the reciprocal influence of politics on popular culture and vice versa.  This course emphasizes critical analysis of politics in film, music and literature. 

PLSC 350: International Organizations and Law
Louis Henkin famously wrote, “...almost all nations observe almost all principles of international law and almost all of their obligations almost all of the time.”  This class attempts to demonstrate how the ‘almosts’ in that quote are key to answering the questions, “Does international law matter and what are the real-world impacts of international organizations?” 

PLSC 354: Politics and Culture in Europe. 3 hours.
An in-depth examination of popular and political culture in Europe, including the study of the history and evolution of the European Union and case studies of culture and institutions in several European nations.

PLSC 357: Politics and Culture in Mexico, Canada, and the United States. 3 hours.
An in-depth examination of the political and popular cultures, institutions and current political issues of Mexico, Canada and the U.S., including a review of the history and evolution of NAFTA and its effects on these three countries.

PLSC 360: Islam and Politics in the Modern Middle East. 3 hours.
The study of the historical development of modern political Islam from the nineteenth century to the present. Topics include Islamic sectarianism, religious minorities and the state in the Middle East and debate on the compatibility of Islam and liberal democracy.

PLSC 365: Egypt and the Third World. 3 hours.
Examination of Egypt as a case study to illuminate common issues and themes among developing countries and to explore the diversity of historical experiences, political systems, economic realities, and social and cultural values in the Third World.

PLSC 366 Washington Center: Studies in International Relations. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite:  Permission of Department Chair. 
Students register for this course while attending the Washington Center Program (TWC) and take a TWC class that focuses on international relations.

PLSC 367: Washington Center: Studies in Comparative Politics. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite:  Permission of Department Chair. 
Students register for this course while attending the Washington Center Program (TWC) and take a TWC class that focuses on comparative politics.

PLSC 368 Washington Center: Studies in American Politics. 3 hours. 
Prerequisite:  Permission of Department Chair. 
Students register for this course while attending the Washington Center Program (TWC) and take a TWC class that focuses on American politics.

PLSC 370: Women and Politics. 3 hours.
A comparative study of the role of women as political actors in western and non-western societies.  Students will consider the role of gender in shaping political attitudes and perceptions, and the policy issues that affect women in political and daily life.

PLSC 375: Arab-Israeli Conflict. 3 hours.
An in-depth examination of the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict, including a review of its historical, political, cultural and religious roots. This course also uses the Arab-Israeli conflict to address broader issues of international conflict and conflict resolution.   Same as HIST 375.

PLSC 380: Western Political Thought. 3 hours.
An examination of political thought representing the fundamental ideas and theories that have shaped political thinking from antiquity to the present.

PLSC 382 Constitutionalism and The Separation of Powers. 3 hours.
This course examines the tradition of constitutional theory, with a special emphasis on the importance of the separation of powers. Beginning with ancient political theory, the course charts the rise and development of constitutionalism in such important thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Locke, and Madison. The rise of the modern doctrine of separation of powers will be given a central place. It will be studied to determine its continuing influence on both American and international discussions of democracy.

PLSC 383 American Social and Political Thought. 3 hours.
 A study of major currents of social and political thought and their impact on American culture and institutions.

PLSC 384 Political Liberalism and Justice. 3 hours.
This course examines the fundamental liberal ideas and concepts underlying democratic institutions and practices, beginning with Rawls’ theory of justice.  Students will apply these ideas and concepts to both American and international political settings, where questions of democracy are necessary for global development.  Special attention will be given the place of human rights in democratic societies.

PLSC 386 Political Theory of the Federalist Papers. 3 hours.
This course examines the political theory of the Federalists Papers and how the U.S. Constitution fits into the tradition of constitutionalism.  It presents the normative theory, psychology and theoretical philosophy, as well as the historical arguments used to defend the Constitution. 

PLSC 442: Rhetorical Criticism. 3 hours.
Recommended prerequisite:  COMM 215, COMM 351.

Rhetorical Criticism is a writing-intensive course that teaches students how to critically analyze and evaluate public discourse. Attention is given to the logical, aesthetic, political and controversial components of public discourse designed to influence belief, affect social change and craft cultural identities. Topics include the scope and function of rhetoric in contemporary culture, various approaches to rhetorical criticism and contexts for criticism including politics, religion and social movements. Same as COMM 442.

PLSC 494: Senior Seminar. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: PLSC 250.
Capstone research course for majors.  This course reviews research methods in political science, and requires students to complete an original project including an extensive literature review and theoretical framework of a question in political science research.  Students are required to share their research in public oral presentations as part of the final assignment.

PLSC 290, 390, 490: Selected Topics. 1-3 hours.

PLSC 291, 292, 391, 392, 491, 492: Research.

PLSC 397, 398, 497, 498: Internship.