Contact:
Keith Coates
Chair of Mathematics & Computer Science
Associate Professor of Mathematics
Office: (417) 873-7380
kcoates@drury.edu

Mathematics Course Descriptions

100 Level Courses:
MATH 100: Intermediate Algebra
MATH 101: Fundamental Mathematical Concepts I
MATH 102: Fundamental Mathematical Concepts II
MATH 109: College Algebra
MATH 110: Trigonometry
MATH 141: Applied Logic

200 Level Courses:
MATH 203: Mathematics and Inquiry
MATH 205: Mathematical Connections
MATH 211: Precalculus
MATH 227: Introduction to Statistics
MATH 228: Applied Statistics in Exercise and Sport Science
MATH 230: Business Calculus
MATH 231: Calculus I
MATH 232: Calculus II
MATH 233: Calculus III
MATH 234: Introduction to Mathematical Proof
MATH 235: Linear Algebra
MATH 236: Honors Calculus I
MATH 241: Discrete Mathematics
MATH 290: Selected Topics
MATH 291, 292: Research

300 Level Courses:
MATH 301: Abstract Algebra
MATH 326: Probability Theory
MATH 327: Mathematical Statistics
MATH 330: Geometry
MATH 340: Numerical Analysis
MATH 366: Differential Equations
MATH 390: Selected Topics
MATH 391, 392: Research

400 Level Courses:
MATH 421: Real Variables
MATH 432: Complex Variables
MATH 440: Topology
MATH 490: Selected Topics
MATH 491, 492: Research
MATH 493: Senior Seminar
MATH 494: Senior Seminar for Secondary Education Math Majors


MATH 100: Intermediate Algebra. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: Prealgebra or beginning algebra in high school or college.
The traditional topics of intermediate algebra through quadratic equations and functions.

MATH 101: Fundamental Mathematical Concepts I. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or MATH 100.
Development of the number systems — whole numbers through real numbers. Problem solving strategies, functions, elementary logic, and set theory are included.

MATH 102: Fundamental Mathematical Concepts II. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 101.
An introduction to geometric concepts, measurement, probability, statistics, and basic computer concepts.

MATH 109: College Algebra. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 100 or one year of high school algebra and one year of high school geometry.
A study of functions and graphs, solutions of equations and inequalities and the properties of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

MATH 110: Trigonometry. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 109 or two years of high school algebra and one year of high school geometry.
The study of trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions and their applications.

MATH 141. Applied Logic. 1 hour.
This course is designed to help students learn to apply the tools of logic to concrete situations, such as those posed on LSAT and GMAT tests. The course will include a discussion of propositional logic, propositional equivalences, rules of inference and common fallacies. Students are strongly encouraged to take PHIL 100: Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking either prior to or concurrently with this course.

MATH 203: Mathematics and Inquiry. 3 hours.
I
n this course, students will develop quantitative and abstract reasoning abilities necessary to solve complex problems. Literacy in mathematics is developed, with concepts and skills from such areas as algebra, trigonometry, calculus, probability, statistics and computer science. This course will address critical thinking and problem-solving skills, not simply numerical manipulations related to a single subdiscipline of mathematics. Emphasis will be placed on defining and setting up problems; understanding the steps required to solve various types of problems; understanding the factual information and quantitative abilities required for problem solving; and understanding how necessary information can be obtained from text material, resource individuals and computer resources.

MATH 205 Mathematical Connections. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: At least two years of high school algebra.
A quantitative resasoning course for students in the liberal arts, focusing on applications of mathematics to social issues in our world. Contains the study of providing urban services, making social choices, constructing fair voting systems, and planning the fair division of resources.

MATH 211 Precalculus. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: High-school level algrebra skills and/or successful completion of College Algebra are required.
This course is designed to prepare students for Calculus I. It covers a variety of topics from algebra, with emphasis on the development of rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions including their essential properties, graphs and basic applications. Additional topics range from linear systems to conic sections.

MATH 227: Introduction to Statistics. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra.
A course to acquaint the student with the basic ideas and language of statistics including such topics as: descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, basic experimental design, elementary probability, binomial and normal distributions, estimation and test of hypotheses, and analysis of variance.

MATH 228: Applied Statistics in Exercise and Sport Science. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra.
The course contains the mathematical basis for statistics including descriptive measures, probability and hypothesis testing. Some applications in exercise science will include tests, ANOVA, correlation and regression. Same as EXSP 228. Credit will not be given for both MATH 227 and MATH/EXSP 228.

MATH 230: Business Calculus. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra.
Topics from differential and integral calculus with an emphasis on business applications. This class cannot be used as a prerequisite for MATH 232.

MATH 231: Calculus I. 4 hours.
Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra and one semester of high school trigonometry.
A study of the fundamental principles of analytic geometry and calculus with emphasis on differentiation.

MATH 232: Calculus II. 4 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 231. It is recommended that students receive a grade of C or better in MATH 231 to be successful in this course.
Continuation of Calculus I including techniques of integration and infinite series.

MATH 233: Calculus III. 4 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 232. It is recommended that students receive a grade of C or better in MATH 231 to be successful in this course.
Functions of two variables, partial differentiation, applications of multiple integrals to areas and volumes, line and surface integrals, vectors.

MATH 234: Introduction to Mathematical Proof. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 231. Recommend prerequisite: MATH 232.
A careful introduction to the process of constructing mathematical arguments, covering the basic ideas of logic, sets, functions and relations. A substantial amount of time will be devoted to looking at important forms of mathematical argument such as direct proof, proof by contradiction, proof by contrapositive and proof by cases. Applications from set theory, abstract algebra, or analysis may be covered at the discretion of the instructor.

MATH 235: Linear Algebra. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 232.
Study of linear transformations, matrices, vector spaces.

MATH 236 Honors Calculus I. 4 hours. Prerequisite: Math ACT score of 28 or better and a course in trigonometry with a grade of B or better.
This course is an introduction to single variable calculus with an emphasis on differential calculus. We will cover limits, derivatives, and applications, with an emphasis on both calculational techniques and their theoretical underpinnings. The course will conclude with an exploration of the Riemann sum definition of the definite integral.

MATH 241: Discrete Mathematics. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: two years of high school algebra.
This course includes propositional logic, induction and recursion, number theory, set theory, relations and functions, graphs and trees, and permutations and combinations. Same as CSCI 241.

MATH 301: Abstract Algebra. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 234 or MATH 241 and CSCI 262, MATH 235.
The elementary properties of groups, rings and fields are developed.

MATH 326: Probability Theory. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 232. It is recommended that students receive a grade of C or better in MATH 232 to be successful in this course.
This course includes an introduction to probability theory, discrete and continuous random variables, mathematical expectation, and multivariate distributions.

MATH 327: Mathematical Statistics. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 326. It is recommended that students receive a grade of C or better in MATH 326 to be successful in this course.
This course takes the material from MATH 326 into the applications side of statistics including functions of random variables, sampling distributions, estimations, and hypothesis testing.

MATH 330: Geometry. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 234.
Foundations of Euclidian geometry from the axioms of Hilbert and an introduction to non-Euclidian geometry.

MATH 340: Numerical Analysis. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 231, MATH 232.
Numerical solutions to mathematical problems are studied. Topics include approximating solutions to equations, interpolation, numerical differentiation and integrating, and numerical linear algebra. Same as CSCI 340.

MATH 366: Differential Equations. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 232.
A first course in ordinary differential equations.

MATH 421: Real Variables. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 233, MATH 234. Recommend prerequisite: MATH 301.
Real number system, set theory, continuity, differentiability.

MATH 432: Complex Variables. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 233, MATH 234.
A study of complex numbers, analytic functions, complex integration, residues and series.

MATH 440: Topology. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: MATH 234.
An introduction to point-set topology. Metric spaces, connectedness, completeness, compactness are some of the topics discussed.

MATH 493: Senior Seminar. 3 hours.
Modern topics in mathematics are discussed in a seminar setting. Students integrate their study of mathematics throughout their undergraduate years and explore the connections among mathematics and other courses they have pursued. Departmental assessment of the major is included. This course is designed to be a capstone experience taken during the final semester of the senior year.

MATH 494: Senior Seminar for Secondary Education Math Majors. 3 hours.
The history and philosophy of mathematics are discussed in a seminar setting. All students in this course must complete a project wherein familiar questions asked by high school math students are examined and answered in depth. Also, students are required to read and make a presentation on an article from an approved mathematics education journal. Department assessment of the major is included. This course is designed to be a capstone experience taken during the fall semester of the senior year.

MATH 290, 390, 490: Selected Topics. 1-3 hours.

MATH 291, 292, 391, 392, 491, 492: Research.