History Course Descriptions

100 Level Courses:
HIST 101: United States History to 1865
HIST 102: United States History 1865 to Present
HIST 108: World History from 1500
HIST 109: Asian History to 1700

200 Level Courses:
HIST 212: Food, Culture and Identity in Asia
HIST 213: China: Film and History
HIST 220: Ancient Civilization
HIST 223: Medieval Europe
HIST 225: Renaissance and Reformation
HIST 230: Modern Europe
HIST 244: Russia and the Soviet Union
HIST 250: Engaging the Past: Colonial America
HIST 251: History of Slavery
HIST 252: Engaging the Past: U.S. Sports History
HIST 255: Engaging the Past: The Black Death
HIST 258: Engaging the Past: Revolutions, 1789-1917
HIST 265: Native American History
HIST 273: Rome, the City: Ancient to Renaissance
HIST 274: Vietnam and American Society

300 Level Courses:
HIST 306: History and Culture of Taiwan
HIST 312: Islam and the West
HIST 321: Women in European History
HIST 322: Joan of Arc: Film and History
HIST 325: Gender and Culture: East Asia
HIST 330: The American Civil War
HIST 342: The European Witch-Hunts
HIST 343: Latin American History
HIST 344: History of Modern Africa
HIST 346: History of Modern China
HIST 347: History of Modern Japan
HIST 350: African-American History
HIST 374: Social History of India
HIST 375: Arab-Israeli Conflict
HIST 376: The American South Since 1865
HIST 380: Hitler and Stalin
HIST 381: The Holocaust
HIST 385: Cold War Conflict and the Developing World

400 Level Courses:
HIST 290, 390, 490: Selected Topics
HIST 291, 292, 391, 392, 491, 492: Research

HIST 494: Capstone Research Seminar
HIST 496: Honors Research


HIST 101: United States History to 1865. 3 hours.
A broad survey of the major political and social developments from the time of Columbus to the Civil War. Offered fall semester.

HIST 102: United States History 1865 to Present. 3 hours.
A broad survey of the major political and social developments from the Civil War to the present. Offered spring semester.

HIST 108: World History from 1500. 3 hours.
A broad survey of world history from 1500 to the present. Exploration of various modern world cultures with a focus on connections and conflicts between them.

HIST 109: Asian History to 1700. 3 hours.
This course examines the cultural traditions and transformations in Asian history from its origins to around 1700. Identifies specific historical events, political developments and philosophical, religious and social innovations in the history of East Asia, South Asia and Southeast Asia as well as highlights the contributions and transformations as it interacts with other world civilizations.

HIST 212: Food, Culture and Identity in Asia. 3 hours.
Food is a powerful cultural symbol that connects individuals and the community. This course examines the relationship between food and the history of agricultural practices, religion, social structure, rituals, family dynamics and state policies in Asia, particularly China, Japan, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

HIST 213: China: Film and History. 3. hours.
This course examines major themes and changes in Chinese history through films and texts. Some of the themes include modernization, political and economic transformation, the Cultural Revolution, and globalization.

HIST 220: Ancient Civilization. 3 hours.
This course provides an introduction to ancient civilization, with special emphasis on Greece and Rome. Class examines the origins of ancient civilizations, as well as politics, society, religion, architecture and gender roles.

HIST 223: Medieval Europe. 3 hours.
This course provides an introduction to the Middle Ages, examining the multiple influences that shaped European history from the fourth to the fifteenth century. Particular emphasis is placed on Christianity, the twelfth-century Renaissance, medieval cities, and society and culture.

HIST 225: Renaissance and Reformation. 3 hours.
This course provides an introduction to European history from the thirteenth to the seventeenth century, focusing on the Italian Renaissance and the Reformation. The first half of the class examines late medieval society, especially the society, religion and politics of the Italian city-states. The second half examines the reasons for the Reformation, with special emphasis given to the variety of religious reformations in sixteenth century Europe.

HIST 230 Modern Europe. 3 hours.
This course will examine European history from 1650 to the present, focusing on key historical developments such as absolutism and the state, the scientific revoluation and Enlightenment, revolution, and ideologies of race and empire, nationalism, liberalism, and socialism. Addresses the emergence of fascism, communism and the Cold War. Also considers the effects of these developments on the wider world.

HIST 244 Russia and the Soviet Union. 3 hours.
This course examines the history of Russia from its origins in medieval Kiev to the present-day. Areas of study include the imperial Russian state, revolution, communism, nationalism, and the Soviet Union. Attention given to the multi-cultural nature of its empire and successor states in Central Asia, Eastern Europe, and the Caucasus.

HIST 250 Engaging the Past: Colonial America. 3 hours.
This course examines the history of colonial societies in the Americas. Through the use of the course’s thematic material, students will be introduced to the basic skills used by historians in their investigation of the past, including a close reading and contextualization of primary source texts, the study of historical interpretations and controversies, citation and research methods, effective writing techniques, and oral communication skills.

HIST 251: History of Slavery. 3 hours.
Exploration into the history and social, political, and cultural significance of slavery and the slave trade in various societies and cultures; from slavery in the ancient world to transatlantic slave trade to slavery and its legacy in the modern era.

HIST 252: Engaging the Past: U.S. Sports History. 3 hours.
This course examines major ideas and events in the history of American sports. Through the use of the course's thematic material, students will be introduced to the basic skills used by historians in their investigation of the past, including a close reading and contextualization of primary source texts, the study of historical interpretations and controversies, citation and research methods, effective writing techniques and oral communication skills.

HIST 255: Engaging the Past: The Black Death. 3 hours.
This course examines the history of the bubonic plague and other contagious, focusing particularly on the Black Death of 1347 to 1351. Through the use of the course's thematic material, students will be introduced to the basic skills used by historians in their investigation of the past, including a close reading and contextualization of primary source texts, the study of historical interpretations and controversies, citation and research methods, effective writing techniques and oral communication skills.

HIST 258: Engaging the Past: Revolutions, 1789-1917. 3 hours.
This course examines the history revolution from 1789-1917. Through the use of the course's thematic material, students will be introduced to the basic skills used by historians in their investigation of the past, including a close reading and contextualization of primary source texts, the study of historical interpretations and controversies, citation and research methods, effective writing techniques and oral communication skills.

HIST 265: Native American History. 3 hours.
Examines the history of Native Americans from the 1400s to the present. Topics include cultural diversity before European invasions as well as Indian-European encounters. The slave trade, Indian Removal, accommodation and resistance will also be discussed. From Cahokia mounds to the Great Plains resistance, the class provides insights into the complexity of Native American societies and the diversity of the American experience.

HIST 273: Rome, the City: Ancient to Renaissance. 3 hours.
An introduction to the art, architecture and the history of Rome to 1650. Site visits focus on ancient Roman monuments, early Christian symbolism, medieval churches and the centrality of Rome as a Christian center from Peter to the papacy.

HIST 274: Vietnam and American Society. 3 hours.
This course examines America's participation in the Vietnam war and how the conflict shaped the lives of Americans who lives through that era. Offered fall semester.

HIST 306: Taiwan: The Other China. 3 hours.
This course examines Taiwan from the historical, political, cultural and socioeconomic perspectives. The major issues include Taiwan's complex relationship with China, Japan and the United States, as well as its changing "relative location" throughout its history; Taiwan's democratic development; Taiwan's socioeconomic transformation; and the changing cultural identity and conflict.

HIST 312: Islam and the West. 3 hours.
Examination of the historical, cultural, religious, economic and political interactions between the Western and Islamic worlds. Focuses on the place of Muslims in Europe, especially questions the identity and politics. Offered as a study abroad course. Same as PLSC 312.

HIST 321: Women in European History. 3 hours.
Exploration of the lives and voices of European women throughout history and the ideologies that Western society has projected concerning women.

HIST 322: Joan of Arc: Film and History. 3 hours.
Through an examination of trial records and documents, this course examines the life of the peasant Joan of Arc, one of the most popular figures in history. Additional focus on the context of the Middle Ages as well as myth-making and representations in literature, art, film and propaganda. In what ways are historical interpretations shaped by popular culture and cultural biases about the past? How has Joan remained an important cultural construction long after her death?

HIST 325: Gender and Culture: East Asia. 3 hours.
This course explores the complex relationships between women and culture in two major civilizations in East Asia: China and Japan.

HIST 330: The American Civil War. 3 hours.
The causes, nature and consequences of the Civil War; emphasis placed on political and social interpretations of the war as well as its military events.

HIST 342: The European Witch Hunts. 3 hours.
This course examines the witch-hunts in Early Modern Europe. To understand the historical context, this course examines magic, heresy, witch-hunts, and the shifting definitions in the late middle ages. Primary sources highlight the words of the accused and the accusers. Additional foci include the popular modern myths associated with the witch-hunts, as well as examination of modern witch-hunts.

HIST 343: Latin American History
A study of the history and development of Latin America as a region with an examination of several countries as case studies.

HIST 344: History of Modern Africa. 3 hours.
This course examines the history of Africa since 1700, especially the slave trade, missionary activity and imperialism. Second half of class focuses on the development of nationalist ideologies and independence movements, decolonization and the formation of independent African states, as well as contemporary crises.

HIST 346: History of Modern China. 3 hours.
An in-depth study of contemporary Chinese culture and history, with an examination of revolutionary movements and modernization.

HIST 347: History of Modern Japan. 3 hours.
An in-depth study of contemporary Japanese history and culture examining the Meiji Restoration, Japanese expansion and interaction in Asia, World War II and the challenges faced by Japan after World War II.

HIST 350: African-American History. 3 hours.
A survey of nineteenth and twentieth century African-American history, with an emphasis on cultural, social, economic, and political issues.

HIST 374: Social History of India. 3 hours.
Focus on the origins and development of major religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism, Islamic India, imperialism, the historical role of women and gender, and Gandhi. Examination of historical texts and literature, including The Ramayana, Passage to India and Gandhi's letters and essays.

HIST 375 Arab-Israeli Conflict. 3 hours.
An in-depth examination of the history of the Arab-Israeli conflict, tracing its historical, political, cultural, and religious roots. This course also uses the Arab-Israeli conflict to address broader issues of international conflict and conflict resolution. Same as PLSC 375.

HIST 376: The American South Since 1865. 3 hours.
An examination of life in the American South since the end of the civil war, with particular emphasis on race relations, economic change and popular culture.

HIST 380: Hitler and Stalin. 3 hours.
This course will consider the phenomena of Nazism and Stalinism, focusing on systems of authority, culture, daily life, and the use of violence.

HIST 381 The Holocaust. 3 hours.
A detailed study of the origins, motivations and consequences of the Holocaust. Special focus on historiographical debates and primary sources documents. Is the Holocause unique or does it share commonalities with other genocides?

HIST 385: Cold War Conflict and the Developing World. 3 hours.
An analysis of specific Cold War controversies, particularly those that took place in the Third World; an examination of ideological, cultural and socio-historical aspects of the Cold War.

HIST 494 Capstone Research Seminar. 3 hours.
A senior research project for history students. Students will design and complete an intensive research and writing project of approximately 16-18 pages. Students choose, contextualize, and explicate a series of documents, artifacts and/or images to shape an interpretation of the historical past. Assessing the interpretation within the context of a literature review of secondary scholarship is essential. Research, writing and interpretive skills are emphasized. Research is presented at an undergraduate history conference. Offered fall semester.

HIST 496 Honors Research. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: HIST 494.
An intensive writing project for graduating seniors that is to be completed the semester after HIST 494. With permission of departmental advisor and department chair, history students are eligible to be considered for the honors track in the department. Students should seek permission and complete the selection form in the semester before enrolling in HIST 494. Working with a committee of history faculty, and continuing the research in HIST 494, students complete a thirty-page project over the course of two semesters, relying on primary sources and relevant historiography. Public presentation of research is required. Students who complete the class gain valuable writing and research experience; the final paper is subject to faculty review to be considered for graduation with departmental honors.

HIST 290, 390, 490: Selected Topics. 1-3 hours each.

HIST 291, 292, 391, 392, 491, 492: Research.