Master in Education Course Descriptions

Master in Education Course Descriptions

With the exception of the culminating course, EDUC 700, which is required of all students prior to completion of the master in education except those pursuing tracks where this course is not specified, all courses carrying graduate credit are numbered in the 600s and are open to students holding the baccalaureate degree and admitted to the graduate education program.

Courses are grouped into the following areas: education, humanities, and social sciences. Credit cannot be given for a course for which the student is not registered. Credit cannot be claimed more than once for the same course without special approval.

Professional Education Courses (EDUC)
Humanities & Fine Arts Courses (HFA)
Science & Mathematics Courses (SCI)
Social Science Courses (SS)


Professional Education Courses (EDUC)

Courses in the professional education area are designed to meet the needs and interests of elementary and secondary schoolteachers, special education teachers, and human services professionals.

EDUC 603: Middle School Philosophy and Organization
EDUC 605: Advanced Educational Psychology
EDUC 606: Psychology of the Exceptional Child
EDUC 607: Psychology of Human Growth and Development
EDUC 608: Classroom Management for Teachers
EDUC 609: Methods of Teaching Language Arts
EDUC 610: Behavior Analysis and Intervention
EDUC 611: Counseling Parents of Exceptional Children
EDUC 616: New Teacher Connection
EDUC 617: Early Career Connections
EDUC 618: Step Up Program Completion
EDUC 625: Correction of Mathematical Difficulties
EDUC 632: Literacy Instruction in the Content Area
EDUC 633: Middle School Curriculum and Instruction
EDUC 634: Advanced Curriculum and Instruction
EDUC 638: Teaching and Learning in Diverse Classrooms
EDUC 643: Gifted Conference
EDUC 647: Improvement of Instruction of Children's and Adolescents' Literature
EDUC 648: K-6 Science and Mathematics Teaching
EDUC 649: Introduction to Cross-Categorical Disabilities
EDUC 650: Transition and Career Education
EDUC 651: Evaluation of Abilities and Achievement
EDUC 652: Language Development of the Exceptional Child
EDUC 653: Methods of Teaching Students/Cross-Categorical Disabilities
EDUC 654: Clinical Experience – Elementary
EDUC 655: Clinical Experience – Secondary
EDUC 656: Legal Issues in Education
EDUC 657: Developing and Sustaining Professional Learning Communities
EDUC 658: Strategies in Teaching Math K-6
EDUC 659: Strategies in Teaching Life Science K-6
EDUC 660: Reading Practicum I: Elementary
EDUC 661: Reading Practicum II: Secondary
EDUC 665: Improvement of Reading Instruction
EDUC 667: Analysis and Correction of Reading Disabilities
EDUC 668: Strategies in Teaching Physical Science K-6
EDUC 669: Strategies in Teaching Earth Science K-6
EDUC 670: Leadership in Reading
EDUC 673: Fundamentals of Higher Education
EDUC 675: Teaching the Gifted in the Regular Classroom
EDUC 676: A Survey of Gifted and Talented Education
EDUC 677: Curriculum and Instruction for the Gifted
EDUC 678: Administration and Supervision of Gifted Programs
EDUC 679: Counseling and Guidance of the Gifted
EDUC 686: Practicum in Working with Gifted Students
EDUC 689: Introduction to Educational Research
EDUC 690: Selected Topics
EDUC 691: Research
EDUC 699: Culminating Internship
EDUC 700: Capstone Seminar

EDUC 603: Middle School Philosophy and Organization. 3 hours.
This course provides an understanding of the philosophy, history, structure and future direction of middle-level education, as well as how those topics relate to the characteristics of the transcendent. Topics include an overview of curriculum and instructional strategies appropriate for middle-level education. These topics also consider the culturally diverse populations and special needs students.

EDUC 605 Advanced Educational Psychology & Assessment. 3 hours.
Th is is an advanced study of the cognitive process, the psychological foundations of educational practice, and the assessment processes utilized in the K-12 classroom setting. The course addresses cognition, conditions for optimal learning, assessment designs, formal/informal test construction, alternative assessment strategies, data collection and analysis, instructional decision making based on assessment results, and current issues/research regarding assessment.

EDUC 606 Psychology of the Exceptional Child. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: EDUC 203. This course surveys all areas of exceptionalities. It is designed to help the post-baccalaureate prospective teacher identify and plan instruction for children with exceptionalities.

EDUC 607: Psychology of Human Growth and Development. 3 hours.
This is a study of the process of human development from conception through adolescence with particular emphasis on development during the elementary school, middle school and high school-age periods of growth and development. The course emphasizes the contemporary research, theory and findings in the areas of cognitive, emotional and physical development with a focus on psychological processes and structures and their implications for the education process.

EDUC 608: Classroom Management for Teachers. 3 hours.
The purpose of this course is to present effective techniques for eliciting appropriate social and academic behaviors in the classroom. Several models for behavioral intervention in both regular and special education classrooms are examined, with special emphasis on the management of behaviors that interfere with the learning process.

EDUC 609: Methods of Teaching Language Arts. 3 hours.
A course designed for the in-service teacher to consider the fundamental nature and structure of the language arts and strategies for improving instruction of language arts in the middle school curriculum. Special attention will be given to curriculum frameworks provided by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the National Council of Teachers of English. Candidates are provided the opportunity to understand and explore the theories, models, and strategies for teaching and learning the components associated with language arts. The course emphasizes the acquisition of language arts knowledge and the application of instructional strategies aligned with reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and visual representations. The course includes examination and evaluation of textbooks and other curriculum materials; planning of lessons and units; discussion of issues involving professional educators; development of means to assess learning; and discussion of methods to teach the language arts discipline.

EDUC 610: Behavior Analysis and Intervention. 3 hours.
This course is intended only for students admitted to the DATSE program. The purpose of this course is to present effective techniques for eliciting appropriate social and academic behaviors in the classroom. Several models for behavioral intervention in both regular and special education classrooms are examined, with special emphasis on the management of behaviors that interfere with the learning process.

EDUC 611: Counseling Parents of Exceptional Children. 3 hours.
Children learn best when close cooperation exists between school and home. For children with learning problems it is all the more necessary for skills learned in school to be reinforced in the home. This course presents counseling techniques for helping teachers to elicit and maintain the parental cooperation needed to maximize student learning and development.

EDUC 616: New Teacher Connection. 1 hour.
Prerequisite: Employment as a full-time teacher. This course, delivered in collaboration with the new teacher’s employing school district, is the first in a series of three courses. Th is course is designed to begin the process of eff ectively inducting new teachers to the education profession. This is accomplished by delivering support at multiple levels including thoughtful, sustained mentoring/coaching of the new teacher. New teachers will receive common language and common practices for eff ective teaching. This course is graded satisfactory or unsatisfactory.

EDUC 617: Early Career Connections. 2 hours.
Prerequisite: EDUC 616. This course, delivered in collaboration with the new teacher’s employing school district, is the second in a series of three courses. The course provides a systems (process) approach to the following topics: cooperative learning, classroom management, lesson planning, research supported instructional strategies, data driven instructional decision making, intervention strategies with children, effective use of instructional time, and development of positive relationships with students, parents, and colleagues. Th is course is graded satisfactory or unsatisfactory.

EDUC 618: Early Career Completion. 3 hours.
Prerequisites: EDUC 616, EDUC 617. This course, delivered in collaboration with the new teacher’s employing school district, is the third in a series of three courses. This course addresses the following topics: research based instructional strategies for each grade level and subject area, working with special needs students, teaching with higher-order thinking skills, strategies for closing achievement gaps, differentiated instruction, assessment strategies, using assessment data to improve instruction and developing the dispositions of professionalism and leadership. Th is course is graded satisfactory or unsatisfactory.

EDUC 625: Correction of Mathematical Difficulties. 3 hours.
This course is designed to provide in-service teachers the opportunity to improve their skills and techniques for identifying, diagnosing and correcting student difficulties in mathematics.

EDUC 632: Literacy Instruction in the Content Area. 3 hours.
This course provides skills and instructional strategies based on current theory and practice for developing and improving reading comprehension of written material associated with various content areas, thereby advancing higher-order, critical, and reflective thinking about text.

EDUC 633: Middle School Curriculum and Instruction. 3 hours.
Students examine educational programs appropriate for students in late childhood and early adolescence. The course emphasizes philosophy, curriculum, instruction and organization of middle schools. Major components of effective middle schools are studied. Programs designed especially for pre-adolescent youth are examined and contrasted to elementary, traditional junior high and high school education. Innovative ways of meeting the distinctive physical, emotional, social and intellectual needs of the middle school student are studied.

EDUC 634: Advanced Curriculum and Instruction. 3 hours.
A course for the in-service teacher, major emphasis is placed on curriculum construction, types of curricula, the influence of social developments and the present-day student population on the school program, underlying psychological and education theory and problems in curriculum development.

EDUC 638 Teaching and Learning in Diverse Classrooms. 3 hours.
This course recognizes the need to support the learning of all students and will expose graduate-level candidates to the challenges, issues, and experiences faced by students from groups identified by race, ethnicity, language, socioeconomic status, exceptionalities, sexual identity, religion, and cutlure.

EDUC 643 Gifted Conference. 1 hour.
This workshop covers a variety of topics including characteristics, curriculum, social and emotional needs, communication, specific activities and other opportunities for gifted students. The participants will interact with experienced teachers of the gifted in large group and small group sessions. The main intent of this workshop is to give teachers of the gifted some special strategies and confidence as they enter their new field. Course may be repeated for credit.

EDUC 647: Improvement of Instruction of Children's and Adolescents' Literature. 3 hours.
This is a course designed for in-service teachers in the elementary and secondary schools. Various types of literature for elementary and secondary school-age groups are surveyed. The ability to evaluate children's and adolescents' literature critically, to understand its history, to assess children's and young adults' needs and developmental levels, and to be able to select and effectively use quality literature are major objectives of the course.

EDUC 648: K-6 Science and Mathematics Teaching. 3 hours.
A KSAM training course for lead teachers and prospective lead teachers, this course includes methodology of teaching hands-on, process-oriented science and mathematics in K-6 and is demonstrated and practiced in a concentrated 40-hour (5 days) summer workshop.

EDUC 649: Introduction to Cross-Categorical Disabilities. 3 hours.
The physical, psychological, social and educational characteristics of school-age students with mild/moderate disabilities will be surveyed. Students will learn strategies for differentiation of instruction, approaches for integrating these students into regular education classrooms, methods for collaborating with other educators to identify and address the needs of students with disabilities. Students also will design instructional strategies in programs to meet the particular learning needs of students with disabilities.

EDUC 650: Transition and Career Education. 3 hours.
This course will provide information and resources needed by special educators to meet the federal requirements for preparing students with disabilities for post-secondary experiences. Course content will include the study of application for aptitude/vocational assessment results, review of life-skills curricula and career exploration resources, identification of employment supports, use of community resources for transition planning, and coordination of transition providers and services. Students also will develop demonstrative individual and school-based programs to assist students' social, cultural and economic integration into their local communities.

EDUC 651: Evaluation of Abilities and Achievement. 3 hours.
Students will review administration and interpretation procedures for formal and informal assessments used in the evaluative process for identifying educational disabilities in school-age students, such as criterion-referenced and normed tests, interview techniques, observational methods and developmental profiles. Students will be required to complete supervised administration of specific tests and will prepare evaluation reports from data collected through assessment. Cultural, social and educational influences affecting the test performance of students will disabilities also will be reviewed.

EDUC 652: Language Development of the Exceptional Child. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: EDUC 649. This course will include an in-depth study of the form and function of language patterns of normally developing children as compared to those patterns of children with exceptionalities. Students will use analysis of language samples as a basis for developing prescriptive interventions.

EDUC 653: Methods of Teaching Students/Cross-Categorical Disabilities. 3 hours.
Prerequisites: EDUC 649 and EDUC 652. Focus of the course will be on the study of theoretical perspectives and research-based methods for instructing schoolchildren with mild/moderate disabilities. Collection and analysis of educational information pertaining to instruction, management and social development will be used for developing educational programs. Applications of knowledge to inclusive settings will be included.

EDUC 654: Clinical Experience – Elementary. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor. Additional fee. Working in settings which include elementary school students with mild/moderate disabilities, students will collaborate with members of multi-disciplinary teams to develop and implement individual education programs and will collect and analyze data pertaining to student diagnosis/academic achievement. Th e outcome of the clinical experience will be an extensive, thorough, and formal case study of a student with a specified disability.

EDUC 655: Clinical Experience – Secondary. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: Approval of Instructor. Additional fee. Working in settings which include secondary school students with mild/moderate disabilities, students will collaborate with members of multi-disciplinary teams to develop and implement individual education programs and will collect and analyze data pertaining to student diagnosis/academic achievement. Th e outcome of the clinical experience will be an extensive, thorough, and formal case study of a student with a specified disability.

EDUC 656: Legal Issues in Education. 3 hours.
This course is designed as a practical study of law as it pertains to the educational process in public and private schools. Areas to be covered in the course are: (1) study of the vocabulary and general process of law; (2) history of legal issues in education; (3) review of the legal educational documents for Missouri and the United States; (4) review of current legal issues in education.

EDUC 657 Developing and Sustaining Professional Learning Communities. 3 hours.
This course provides participants an opportunity to explore the current and emerging research addressing effective practices associated with creating, maintaining, and utilizing professional learning communities to support schools and districts.

EDUC 658: Strategies in Teaching Math K-6. 1 hour.
Strategies of teaching K-6 mathematics in a hands-on, process-oriented style utilizing demonstration followed by participant classroom practice are included in seven 3 -hour sessions, once weekly.

EDUC 659: Strategies in Teaching Life Science K-6. 1 hour.
Strategies of teaching K-6 life science in a hands-on, process-oriented style utilizing demonstration followed by participant classroom practice are included in seven 3 -hour sessions, once weekly.

EDUC 660: Practicum I in Special Reading. 3 hours.
This course provides graduate candidates with clinical experiences at the elementary level to administer clinical assessments designed to identify reading levels, summarize assessment information, and write recommendations in the form of reports. The experience includes accurate use and interpretation of instructional practices, suitable application of reading instruction based on assessment data results, application of differentiated instruction to meet student reading needs, and appropriate use of reading resources and strategies.

EDUC 661: Practicum II in Special Reading. 3 hours.
An advanced course designed to provide graduate candidates with the opportunity to refine, apply, and extend their knowledge of diagnosis, instruction, observation techniques, teaching activities, evaluation strategies, student supervision, coordination of reading programs, and selection/development/implementation of reading materials at the secondary level. The candidate will propose and conduct an action research project in conjunction with the practicum experience.

EDUC 665: Improvement of Reading Instruction. 3 hours.
A course designed for the in-service elementary and secondary teacher, this includes examination of current diagnostic and corrective treatments for reading difficulties. Exemplary reading programs and instructional techniques for teaching subject matter to utilize and develop functional reading will be studied.

EDUC 667: Analysis and Correction of Reading Disabilities. 3 hours.
A course designed to study school age children experiencing difficulties in reading through the examination and utilization of diagnostic testing methods and remedial practices. Candidates learn to adapt testing materials and remedial techniques to the developmental level, diagnostic needs, and cultural and linguistic background of the pupils.

EDUC 668: Strategies in Teaching Physical Science K-6. 1 hour.
Strategies of teaching K-6 physical science in a hands-on, process-oriented style utilizing demonstration followed by participant classroom practice are examined in seven 3 -hour sessions, once weekly.

EDUC 669: Strategies in Teaching Earth Science K-6. 1 hour.
Strategies of teaching K-6 earth science in a hands-on, process-oriented style utilizing demonstration followed by participant classroom practice are examined in seven 3 -hour sessions, once weekly.

EDUC 670: Leadership in Reading. 3 hours.
This course prepares participants to act as change agents within the school-based reading program in areas of curriculum/methodology, organization, administration, and staff development. This course surveys the research regarding the history, approaches, current trends and practical applications of teaching-learning theories of reading instruction, literacy development, comprehension, instructional programs, teaching strategies, and skill development in the area of reading.

EDUC 673 Fundamentals of Higher Education. 3 hours.
Introduces students to the history of higher education in America. Students intending to teach at the post-secondary level will learn student development theories, be exposed to the applied concepts of fi nance and governance, and analyze legal/ethical issues that face American colleges and universities.

EDUC 675: Teaching the Gifted in the Regular Classroom. 3 hours.
This course is designed to assist teachers address the need for appropriate educational experiences for gifted students in regular classroom settings as part of an overall programming effort for this population.

EDUC 676: A Survey of Gifted and Talented Education. 3 hours.
This is an introduction to knowledge of the nature and needs of gifted children, identification strategies, broad programming issues and concepts and teacher qualities and skills. This course presents entry-level concepts and is a prerequisite for future study in the field.

EDUC 677: Curriculum and Instruction for the Gifted. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: EDUC 676. This course delineates the core issues and provides a framework for understanding the content, process and product considerations in developing a comprehensive, articulated curriculum for the gifted. Skills are developed in scope and sequence, promoting appropriate higher level cognitive functioning and assessment of individual student learning styles and needs.

EDUC 678: Administration and Supervision of Gifted Programs. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: EDUC 676. This course introduces the fundamental principles of program planning and development for the gifted. Topics include role functions and referent groups, general educational procedures, steps in basic program development, provision for appropriate resources and refinement of effective supervision strategies.

EDUC 679: Counseling and Guidance of the Gifted. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: EDUC 676. This course focuses on the differential affective characteristics and needs of gifted students. General counseling theories are studied as they apply to helping gifted students discover and utilize effectively their special gifts and talents to aid in the development of potential.

EDUC 686: Practicum in Working with Gifted Students. 3 hours.
Prerequisites: EDUC 676, EDUC 677, EDUC 678, and EDUC 679. This is an intensive practicum, which involves the application of knowledge, skills, strategies, and competencies delineated in the basic courses for teachers of the gifted. Emphasis is given to working with gifted pupils.

EDUC 689: Introduction to Educational Research. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: 27 completed graduate hours. This course is designed to acquaint students with different methods of educational research and statistical procedures. Emphasis is placed on procedures for writing research papers and proposals. This course is designed to be completed the semester prior to EDUC 700 Capstone Seminar.

EDUC 690: Selected Topics.
This course is offered when a special educational need has been identified that can be met through courses on timely and relevant topics in the areas of professional education, science, social science and humanities that will not, at the time scheduled, be added to the regular offerings listed in the catalog.

EDUC 691: Research.
Students who wish to enroll in EDUC 691: Research for independent study must, with the assistance of the supervising teacher, prepare a written statement defining the purpose and procedures of study. This written statement must be approved by the student's advisor and by the director of the graduate program.

EDUC 699 Culminating Internship. 3 hours.
Additional fee. A course designed for the in-service middle school (grades 5-9) teacher providing supervised teaching at the middle school level. Students will receive instruction in curriculum, instruction, and assessment of middle school level education. Th is course replaces EDUC 700 Capstone Seminar for students in the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program and is available only for students in the MAT program.

EDUC 700: Capstone Seminar (for all graduating students except those pursuing tracks where this course is not specified). 3 hours.
Prerequisite: EDUC 689. This course must be taken within the final nine hours of degree work. It is deemed appropriate that every person completing a master in education degree be familiar with the current innovations of the profession. It is of equal importance that he or she relate knowledge derived from various courses to his or her own area of specialization and evaluate personal cognitive and affective growth. The Capstone Seminar aims to fill these needs. Completion of a seminar paper or project is a requirement for a satisfactory grade in this course. Th e paper will focus on the area of specialty for the graduate student. Successful completion of a written or oral, comprehensive, master’s degree examination is required as a part of the Capstone Seminar course. The course is graded satisfactory or unsatisfactory.


Humanities & Fine Arts Courses (HFA)

Courses in the humanities and fine arts area seek to provide the individual with an understanding of humankind's cultural heritage and an awareness of contemporary trends in the fields of art, English, music, philosophy, religion, and drama. Secondary school teachers electing a program of study emphasizing the humanities and fine arts are expected to take 12 to 15 hours in this area.

HFA 600: Humanities
HFA 603: Linguistics
HFA 623: Eastern Experience Through Art and Architecture
HFA 626: Developing Personal and Professional Creativity Through the Liberal Arts
HFA 627: Mark Twain
HFA 628: Creative Writing
HFA 629: Murder, Mystery and Mayhem
HFA 630: Media Literacy
HFA 632: Methods of Teaching Language Arts
HFA 634: Creativity in Language Arts
HFA 636: Current Trends in Teaching and Evaluation of Writing
HFA 640: The Adolescent Hero in American Fiction
HFA 646: Broadcasting for Teachers I
HFA 647: Broadcasting for Teachers II
HFA 648: Broadcasting for Teachers III
HFA 649: Ethics in Media
HFA 650: Media Writing
HFA 651: Digital Editing Techniques and Tips - Adobe
HFA 652: Digital Editing Techniques and Tips - Final Cut Pro
HFA 667: Experimentation in Communication Arts
HFA 671: Philosophical Issues in Contemporary Society
HFA 673: Religious Perspectives and Practices
HFA 681: Culture of the Ozarks
HFA 683: 20th Century World Literature
HFA 684: 20th Century American Literature
HFA 687: African-American Literature
HFA 690: Selected Topics
HFA 691: Research

HFA 600: Humanities. 3 hours.
This course includes investigations into the nature of the humanities through the study of drama, philosophy, music, literature, and art.

HFA 603: Linguistics. 3 hours.
This is a survey of language (with study and examples stressing English) covering variously, grammar (syntax, morphology, phonology); origin and development; dialects (social and regional); onomastics; semantics; writing and spelling; lexicography, etc.

HFA 623: Eastern Experience Through Art and Architecture. 3 hours.
This course examines experiences in non-Western culture through the study of the arts, architecture, and ideas of China, Japan, Korea, and South Asia.

HFA 625 Building Community Through the Arts. 3 hours.
Through combined on-campus seminars and community-based field work, graduate students will experience an integrated and experiential approach to creativity in everyday living and learning. Students will relate the strategies for building community through the arts to their current professional practice.

HFA 626 Developing Personal and Professional Creativity Th rough the Liberal Arts. 3 hours.
Using the elements and principles of creating art as metaphor, students will explore their personal and professional creativity as they integrate this course’s enriching experiences and insights into their current professional positions.

HFA 627 Mark Twain. 3 hours.
This course is a study of the life, times and works of Samuel Clemens, known by his “non de guerre,” Mark Twain. By reading his works and studying his life, the student will gain a greater appreciation and understanding of his contributions to American literature and thought.

HFA 628 Creative Writing. 3 hours.
This course is for graduate students who are serious about their creative writing goals and teachers who are serious about helping their students achieve their goals. Students will be reading theories about writing from contemporary authors as well as producing their own works and providing constructive help for their fellow writers.

HFA 629 Murder, Mystery and Mayhem. 3 hours.
This course is a study of the mystery as a literary genre. Th e student will study representative works and authors, and so investigate the mystery from its development through the present. Students will also develop their own mystery writing skills.

HFA 630: Media Literacy. 3 hours.
This is a study of media (newspapers, radio, and TV ) as sources of information in America. The course will focus on how the media may be used in the classroom.

HFA 632 Methods of Teaching Language Arts. 3 hours.
A course designed for the in-service teacher to consider the fundamental nature and structure of the language arts and strategies for improving instruction of language arts in the middle school curriculum. Special attention will be given to curriculum frameworks provided by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the National Council of Teachers of English. Candidates are provided the opportunity to understand and explore the theories, models, and strategies for teaching and learning the components associated with language arts. The course emphasizes the acquisition of language arts knowledge and the application of instructional strategies aligned with reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and visual representations. The course includes examination and evaluation of textbooks and other curriculum materials; planning of lessons and units; discussion of issues involving professional educators; development of means to assess learning; and discussion of methods to teach the language arts discipline.

HFA 634: Creativity in Language Arts. 3 hours.
This is a study in the development and fostering of creativity in the classroom, with particular regard to written and oral communication activities.

HFA 636: Current Trends in Teaching and Evaluation of Writing. 3 hours.
A survey of new theories of writing and language development in elementary, middle school, and secondary schools. Students read and evaluate new approaches and test them in their writing.

HFA 640: The Adolescent Hero in American Fiction. 3 hours.
The purpose of this course is to study the problems of American youth as they are reflected and analyzed in literature. The course emphasizes discussion of each author's views on the causes and consequences of adolescent unrest in our society and it asks students in the class to formulate their own conclusions on the problems of American adolescents. There is ample opportunity to consider the traditions and techniques of our own literary culture as well as the figure of the adolescent.

HFA 646: Broadcasting for Teachers I. 3 hours.
Participation in ASB (Academy of Scholastic Broadcasting) workshop is required for this course. Th is demanding course will give the educatorstudents a hands-on, real-world experience they can easily transfer to their own classrooms in the fall. Production techniques will be taught by allowing the students to construct their own video projects. Digital and linear editing will be incorporated, numerous lesson plans and strategies will be distributed and discussed, professionals will offer tips, staff will utilize student-produced work for instructional purposes, and media literacy issues will be covered each day. The course will be applicable to middle and high school teachers, regardless of the amount of experience they have had in the subject area. There is an additional fee for participation in this course.

HFA 647 Broadcasting for Teachers II. 3 hours.
Participation in ASB (Academy of Scholastic Broadcasting) workshop is required for this course. Prerequisite: HFA 646 Broadcasting for Teachers I. Th is advanced course will give the educator-students a hands-on, real world experience they can easily transfer to their own classrooms in the fall. This course is a follow-up to Broadcasting I and provides students with in-depth production techniques; digital and linear editing; as well as lesson plans and strategies. This course is applicable for middle and high school teachers who have already attended Broadcasting for Teachers I. There is an additional fee for participation in the course.

HFA 648 Broadcasting for Teachers III. 3 hours.
Participation in ASB (Academy of Scholastic Broadcasting) workshop is required for this course. Prerequisites: HFA 646 Broadcasting for Teachers I and HFA 647 Broadcasting for Teachers II. This advanced course will give the educator-students a hands-on, real-world experience they can easily transfer to their own classrooms in the fall. This course is a follow-up to Broadcasting II and provides students with in-depth production techniques; digital and linear editing; as well as lesson plans and strategies. This course is applicable for middle and high school teachers who have already attended Broadcasting for Teachers I and II. Th ere is an additional fee for participation in the course.

HFA 649: Ethics in Media. 3 hours.
Exploring ethical guidelines for professional behavior, this course surveys federal, state and municipal laws governing freedom of speech and commerce in journalism, public relations and advertising. It covers the reasoning and precedents behind the laws and regulations that affect communication and media.

HFA 650 Media Writing. 3 hours.
Writing for print, broadcast, advertising and public relations with a special emphasis on the convergence of print with electronic publishing. Students learn the implications and potential of interactivity and cybertext.

HFA 651 Digital Editing Techniques and Tips - Adobe. 1 hour.
This course in Adobe Premiere Pro editing software takes the student through the entire process of capturing media to the hard drive, organizing files, creating a time line and putting the finishing touches on a multi-media project. Basic and advanced techniques will be introduced, along with a number of shortcuts and special approaches. Graphics, audio editing, special effects and transitions will all be a part of this course. There is an additional fee for participation in the course.

HFA 652 Digital Editing Techniques and Tips - Final Cut Pro. 1 hour.
This course in Final Cut Pro editing software takes the student through the entire process of capturing media to the hard drive, organizing fi les, creating a time line and putting the finishing touches on a multi-media project. Basic and advanced techniques will be introduced, along with a number of shortcuts and special approaches. Graphics, audio editing, special effects and transitions will be part of this course.

HFA 667: Experimentation in Communication Arts. 3 hours.
This course proposes to explore new methods of creating verbal facility in teachers and students from kindergarten to college. Emphasis is also given to new approaches to the understanding of non-verbal communication. Th ere is an additional fee for participation in the course.

HFA 671: Philosophical Issues in Contemporary Society. 3 hours.
Students examine the nature of value judgments, the methods of their analysis and verification, and their systematic application in the areas of science, religion, art, morality, education, and social policy.

HFA 673: Religious Perspectives and Practices. 3 hours.
The contemporary influence and characteristics of major Christian church groups and major living world religions is the focus of this class.

HFA 681: Culture of the Ozarks. 3 hours.
This course, designed to develop an understanding and appreciation of the native culture of the Ozarks, deals with the cultural development of Ozarks peoples from the first Native-Americans and early settlers to their contemporary descendants. This course fulfills nonprofessional requirement in either the social science or in the area of humanities and fine arts.

HFA 683: 20th Century World Literature. 3 hours.
Students examine the work Students examine the work of major 20th century writers or literary themes with special emphasis upon contemporary poetry and fiction.

HFA 684: 20th Century American Literature. 3 hours.
A study of important themes and writers as they relate to the ideals and values of American culture, particular emphasis is placed on the insights, offered by authors and their characters, into common attitudes and problems of youth in dealing with family, friends, school, and conventions of adult society.

HFA 687 African-American Literature. 3 hours.
Designed primarily to develop in elementary, middle school and secondary teachers a more complex, sympathetic and profound understanding of African- American experience, this course focuses on literature of black Americans. Attention is paid to the history and total culture of black America.

HFA 690 Special Topics. 3 hours.

HFA 691 Research.
Students who wish to enroll in 691 Research for independent study must, with the assistance of the supervising teacher, prepare a written statement defining the purpose and procedures of study. This written statement must be approved by the student’s advisor and by the director of the graduate program.


Science & Mathematics (SCI)

Courses in this field are designed to supplement the training of the general or specialized teacher, broadening the student’s background in the various fields of science, acquainting him or her with current frontiers of scientific investigation and providing an understanding of the fundamental principles of science that should be included in the education of every citizen. Secondary school teachers electing a program of study emphasizing science are expected to take 12 to 15 hours in this area.

SCI 601: Science: Its Impact on Society
SCI 609: Physical Science Concepts
SCI 620: Technology in the Classroom
SCI 622: Improvement of K-12 Mathematics Instruction
SCI 623: History, Security & Ethics of Technology
SCI 625: Online Pedagogy
SCI 626: Web Communications and Design
SCI 627: Advanced Web Design and Development
SCI 628: Technology Infrastructure & Support
SCI 629: Technology Internship
SCI 631: Improvement of K-12 Science Instruction
SCI 632: Educational Evaluation
SCI 633: Instructional Product Development
SCI 634: Instructional Design and Delivery
SCI 635: Simulations & Virtual Reality
SCI 638: Applied Statistics
SCI 639: Data Analysis
SCI 640: Integers, Brain Research and Differentiated Instruction
SCI 641: From Pattern to Functions
SCI 642: Introduction to Continuous Functions
SCI 644: Geometry and Measurements
SCI 645: Solving Equations
SCI 646: Exercise Physiology
SCI 661: Field Biology
SCI 662: Studies in Environmental Problems
SCI 663: Astronomy Today
SCI 670: Chemistry and Current Problems
SCI 690: Special Topics

SCI 601: Science: Its Impact on Society. 3 hours.
This course constitutes a study of the important discoveries in science, the people involved in making them and their effect on society as a whole. Innovative teaching techniques are employed and selected case histories are used to illustrate the growth and development of the scientific method and to increase appreciation of the complexities science has in its eff ect on society.

SCI 609: Physical Science Concepts. 3 hours.
This course is intended to give the non-science major a background in the basic concepts of physical science. Topics are selected from the areas of astronomy, physics, chemistry and earth science. Topics are handled with a minimum of mathematics and the historical aspect of the development of science is included in the discussions.

SCI 620: Technology in the Classroom. 3 hours.
Students are required to take this course during their fi rst two semesters of graduate study. This course is required for all programs leading to the master in education degree, and provides an introduction to educational technology. The focus of the course includes how to operate the technologies, use the technologies to enhance personal productivity and apply technologies in a learning/instructional environment.

SCI 622: Improvement of K-12 Mathematics Instruction. 3 hours.
A course designed for the in-service teacher to consider the fundamental structure of mathematics and strategies for improving instruction of mathematics in the K-12 school curriculum. Special attention is given to the curriculum frameworks provided by the National Council of Teacher of Mathematics and other educational agencies.

SCI 623: History, Security & Ethics of Technology. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: SCI 620 or approval of instructor. Th is course is designed to prepare educators with historical, security and ethical situations that will be encountered in educational technology.

SCI 625: Online Pedagogy. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: SCI 620 or approval of instructor. Teaching and learning online is the primary focus of this course. Students will know and be able to design learning environments that are presented entirely online utilizing the Blackboard technology design tool. Th e emphasis is on designing and learning environments that encourage and motivate students as their knowledge and skills in using Blackboard are developed.

SCI 626: Web Communications and Design. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: SCI 620 or approval of instructor. Th is course will provide the knowledge and skills to design Web pages that support the school setting. Students will learn and apply best practices for the layout and structural design of websites and create content specifi cally optimized for the Worldwide Web. Emphasis will be on practical applications of education-focused Web design.

SCI 627: Advanced Web Design and Development. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: SCI 626. Based on knowledge obtained in SCI 626, this course will take a handson approach to learning the technical skills required to construct websites that support the educational environment. A variety of coding techniques and Internet technologies will be utilized to provide a toolbox that students can use to create eff ective and effi cient websites. Students will experience the entire website implementation process from layout sketch to going live.

SCI 628: Technology Infrastructure & Support. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: SCI 620 or approval of instructor. Educators will have the opportunity to design, develop and implement technology plans at the classroom, building and district level. Visits and interaction with area school district technology coordinators will be an integral part of this course. Primary focus will be on systems, servers, technology layout and design, as well as purchasing and procurement of technology.

SCI 629: Technology Internship. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: A in SCI 620 or approval of instructor. Th is course must be taken as the last course in the Instructional Technology program. Students will be placed in an educational setting to develop handson knowledge and skills necessary to become a technology director at the building and/or district level. Th e primary focus will be the utilization of the knowledge and skills gained from all of the “Instructional Technology” courses (except for EDUC 700, Capstone Seminar) and applying that information to the school setting.

SCI 631: Improvement of K-12 Science Instruction. 3 hours.
A course designed for the in-service teacher to improve background knowledge in science concepts and instructional strategies in the elementary, middle school or high school curriculum. Emphasis is given to a hands on, process-oriented instructional approach incorporating active research related to water quality monitoring, science fair preparation, minority scientists and community resources for science education.

SCI 632: Educational Evaluation. 3 hours.
Th is course is designed to provide basic instruction terminology and methods of educational evaluation. Students will study techniques for evaluating the eff ectiveness of instructional/educational programs, including developing written and performance tests and survey instruments, and determining reliability and validity of evaluation instruments. Students will be able to defi ne vocabulary terms, explain the evaluations process and procedures used in various evaluation models, identify evaluation purposes, determine which evaluation design is most appropriate, use the library and Internet, construct data gathering instruments, collect and interpret data, read evaluation reports and interpret their results and write comprehensive evaluation reports based upon an original study. Th is course will not lead to a public school teaching certifi cate.

SCI 633: Instructional Product Development. 3 hours.
Students will examine the use of educational models to create instruction that is appropriate from a pedagogical and practical viewpoint. Emphasis will be on theories and models to support the following: analysis of the learner environment and needs; design of a set of specifi cations for an eff ective, effi cient, and relevant learner environment; development of all learner and management materials; and evaluation of the results of the development using formative and summative methods. Students will be asked to make well-informed decisions regarding modifi cation to products/ materials/programs (formative) and determining the value of existing products/materials/ programs for possible adoption (summative). Th is course will not lead to a public school teaching certifi cate.

SCI 634: Instructional Design and Delivery. 3 hours.
A study of the systematic processes of translating principles of learning and instruction into plans for instructional materials and activities. Th ese processes include designing training programs, developing design strategies and models, and improving instructional eff ectiveness. Specifi cations for educational products and systematic planning procedures will be developed. Th e use of computer models and simulations will enhance the instructional design process. Th is course will not lead to a public school teaching certifi cate.

SCI 635: Simulations & Virtual Reality. 3 hours.
An introduction to creating and using simulations in an online classroom setting. Th is course will not lead to a public school teaching certifi cate.

SCI 638: Applied Statistics. 3 hours.
Students focus on a comprehensive package of statistical techniques, measurement theory and testing procedures designed to provide theoretical and practical learning experiences for physical educators. Statistical concepts covered include frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, measures of variability, percentile ranks, standard scores, probability and correlational techniques.

SCI 639: Data Analysis. 3 hours.
In this course, teachers learn the mathematical content for teaching their students about descriptive data. Th ey learn to ask questions, gather necessary data, organize, visualize, and analyze the data and communicate that analysis. Th ey use spreadsheets as a tool to organize, visualize and communicate data.

SCI 640: Integers, Brain Research and Differentiated Instruction. 3 hours.
Teachers develop a mathematical understanding of the key concepts of integers from teaching algebra. Th e course integrates standards-based lessons with strategies for diff erentiated instruction and brainbased research classroom applications. Participants have opportunities to view video clips of master teachers working with their students, followed with online discussions and professional online refl ection journals.

SCI 641: From Pattern to Functions. 3 hours.
Teachers investigate how patterns lead to an understanding of discrete functions. Th e course explores number sequences, geometric patterns, function machines, t-tables, graphs and how to generalize rules in function notation.

SCI 642: Introduction to Continuous Functions. 3 hours.
Prerequisite: SCI 641. Teachers continue to learn more on the study of functions. Attention focuses on direct variation, other linear equations, their slope and y-intercept, and the standard form of a line: y=mx+b. Th e course culminates with a discussion of simple quadratic and cubic functions. SCI 643 Rational Numbers. 3 hours. Prerequisite: SCI 640. Th is course introduces teachers to rational numbers as an extension of integers. Emphasis is placed on using concrete models to develop conceptual understanding of rational number operations, their algorithms and the application of proportional reasons.

SCI 644: Geometry and Measurements. 3 hours.
Focus is given to two- and three-dimensional geometric fi gures and their properties. Measurement concepts lead to computational algorithms for perimeter, circumference, area and volume.

SCI 645: Solving Equations. 3 hours.
Focus is placed on reviewing algebraic notation and the properties of algebra and their use in translating word problems into algebraic sentences.

SCI 646: Exercise Physiology. 3 hours.
Th is course is designed to help students gain an appreciation and knowledge of how the body functions under conditions of exercise stress. Special emphasis is placed on the development of training programs, diagnosis of exercise and sport-related problems, tests of physiological capacity and the eff ects of exercise on general health, growth and aging.

SCI 661: Field Biology. 3 hours.
Th is is a course designed to increase the teacher’s familiarity with, and understanding of, living things in their natural surroundings; study plants and animals in the more important types of habitats of the region; and illustrate various ways of life. Methods of collection, identifi cation and preservation of specimens are included in the course.

SCI 662: Studies in Environmental Problems. 3 hours.
A course designed to meet the current needs of the educator in respect to developing environmental awareness. Basic principles of ecology are explored as a means of establishing a framework within which the student can relate to the total environment. Some time is devoted to consideration of existing environmental problems, their causes and eff ects on the environment and corrective measures available.

SCI 663: Astronomy Today. 3 hours.
Th is course reviews the history of astronomy but concentrates on the developments of the last 20 years. Th e course is developed to help the teacher use the new astronomical information as it appears in the popular press. For the non-science teacher, this course is a science enrichment study.

SCI 670: Chemistry and Current Problems. 3 hours.
A study of basic chemical concepts that prepares the teacher and students to become eff ectively involved in understanding and evaluating relevant issues of today, such as recent advances in environmental chemistry, the energy crisis, drug abuse, forensic chemistry, and chemistry and society. SCI 691 Research. Students who wish to enroll in 691 Research for independent study must, with the assistance of the supervising teacher, prepare a written statement defi ning the purpose and procedures of study. Th is written statement must be approved by the student’s advisor and by the director of the graduate program.

SCI 690: Special Topics. 3 hours.


Social Science (SS)

These are courses in social sciences intended to provide the individual with an understanding of society. Such an understanding is believed to be essential for mature citizenship and eff ective leadership in a democracy. The general cultural value of these courses is likewise considered to be a contributing factor to the type of preparation believed to be necessary for effective teaching in the academic world. Secondary school teachers electing a program of study emphasizing the social sciences are expected to take 12 to 15 hours in this area.

SS 601: The Sociological Foundations of Educational Practices
SS 618: Group Dynamics
SS 619: Mental Hygiene
SS 620: Family Living
SS 621: Studies in European Civilization
SS 622: The Adolescent Experience in Contemporary Society
SS 624: The Home, the School and the Community
SS 625: Studies in American Civilization
SS 631: Methods of Teaching Social Sciences
SS 635: Studies in Contemporary International Affairs
SS 637: Trends and Issues in Health Education
SS 639: Leadership Techniques
SS 641: Stability and Change in American Government
SS 642: Economics for Teachers
SS 681: Culture of the Ozarks: Past and Present
SS 682: Teaching American History: Pre-Colonial to 1877
SS 691: Research
SS 690: Special Topics

SS 601: The Sociological Foundations of Educational Practices. 3 hours.
This is a study of the sociological background of public school children; modern interpretation of the democratic ideology; current social trends and issues as they aff ect education; application to such school problems as educational objectives, curriculum, guidance, methods, administration, moral education and multicultural education.

SS 618: Group Dynamics. 3 hours.
This is a study of recent experimental research findings in the area of small groups, with particular attention to interpersonal communications.

SS 619: Mental Hygiene. 3 hours.
This course is designed to develop an understanding of the principles of good mental health and the dynamics involved in healthy personality development. As time permits, special study is made of current mental health programs most relevant to the life situations of the students.

SS 620: Family Living. 3 hours.
A study of the changing role of the family in American society, the course emphasizes trends in family structure, the role of men and women in the family relationship and the means of creating intimacy, communication and growth within the family system.

SS 621: Studies in European Civilization. 3 hours.
Students survey the major intellectual trends in European civilization beginning with the Greek and Biblical traditions; the shape of medieval civilization as formed fi rst by Augustine and then by Aquinas; the old and new in the Renaissance and Reformation; the Enlightenment, Romanticism and Existentialism.

SS 622: The Adolescent Experience in Contemporary Society. 3 hours.
Students examine the developmental infl uences that lead to adolescence approached from a multidisciplinary life-span perspective. Adolescence is studied from an integrated biological, psychological, sociological and historical perspective in an approach focused on the special interests and concerns of the teacher and administrator in the contemporary school.

SS 624: The Home, the School and the Community. 3 hours.
The course focuses on the James Comer School Development Program model for parent participation and community involvement for the improvement of elementary and secondary education. Emphasis is given to the environmental transactions among the home, school and the community for the purpose of increasing the quality of life and the educational attainment of children and youth.

SS 625: Studies in American Civilization. 3 hours.
These are selected topics in historical interpretation; the colonial mind, nationalism and sectionalism, Jeff ersonian democracy, the frontier, slavery and abolition, etc.

SS 631: Methods of Teaching Social Sciences. 3 hours.
A course designed for the in-service teacher to consider the fundamental nature of the social sciences and strategies for improving instruction of social sciences in the middle school curriculum. Special attention will be given to curriculum frameworks provided by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and the National Council for the Social Studies. Candidates study the defi nitions, objectives, evaluation, and challenges associated with teaching social sciences. Th e course emphasizes the acquisition of social science knowledge: culture; time, continuity, and change; people, places, and environments; individual development and identity; individuals, groups, and institutions; power, authority, and governance; production, distribution, and consumption; science, technology, and society; global connections; and civic ideals and practices. Th e course includes examination and evaluation of textbooks and other curriculum materials; planning of lessons and units; discussion of issues involving professional educators; development of means to assess learning; and discussion of methods to teach the social sciences discipline.

SS 635: Studies in Contemporary International Affairs. 3 hours.
An examination of infl uence and power relationships among nation-states such as the United States, Russia and China, the course combines a basic scheme for analysis of world aff airs with a concern of international political events that are timely and relevant.

SS 637: Trends and Issues in Health Education. 3 hours.
Th is course is designed to familiarize students with the latest trends and programs in health education. Major health problems of the public schools are studied and their best possible solutions discussed by the class. Th e student is helped to recognize ways in which the school and community can work together to solve health problems.

SS 639: Leadership Techniques. 3 hours.
Th is course studies the development of concepts of leadership and the techniques through which leadership is exercised. Th e infl uence of changing political, social and economic forces on education in general as they aff ect the role of the leader is explored.

SS 641: Stability and Change in American Government. 3 hours.
A systematic survey of politics in the United States in the context of the “democratic” tradition, this course examines both current and projected roles and behavior of formal as well as informal institutions and groups in response to social, economic, and political problems in American society.

SS 642: Economics for Teachers. 3 hours.
Students learn basic economic principles, emphasizing the areas most easily transferred into valuable learning experiences at the elementary, middle school and high school levels.

SS 681: Culture of the Ozarks: Past and Present. 3 hours.
This course, designed to develop an understanding and appreciation of the native culture of the Ozarks, deals with the cultural development of the Ozarks peoples from the fi rst Native Americans and early settlers to their contemporary descendants. Th is course fulfi lls nonprofessional requirement in either the social science or in the area of humanities and fi ne arts.

SS 682: Teaching American History: Pre-Colonial to 1877. 3 hours.
Th is course is designed to guide educators through the development and instruction of a college level American History course from the precolonial time to 1877. Th e course will cover in-depth historical knowledge of key events of this period in history. Students will work throughout the course to develop challenging and insightful ways to pass the information on to future students.

SS 691: Research.
Students who wish to enroll in 691 Research for independent study must, with the assistance of the supervising teacher, prepare a written statement defi ning the purpose and procedures of study. Th is written statement must be approved by the student’s advisor and by the director of the graduate program.

SS 690: Special Topics. 3 hours.