Policies and Procedures

Drury University Notification and Documentation Policy for Special Assistance under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

[Revised 6/25/2014]

A student qualifies as disabled under the definition of Section 504 if he or she:  1) Has a mental or physical impairment, a record of impairment, or is regarded as having such an impairment; and 2) Is substantially limited in his or her major life activities that include abilities such as (but not limited to) self-care, breathing, walking, seeing, performing schoolwork, speaking, and learning.

Drury University is committed to meeting the needs of all student who meet the criteria for special assistance.  These guidelines are designed to supply directions to students concerning the information necessary to accomplish this goal.  It is Drury University’s policy to comply fully with federal and state law regarding students with disabilities and, to the extent of any inconsistency between these guidelines and federal and/or state law, the provisions of the law will apply.

Notification and Documentation Guidelines

It is the student’s responsibility to submit the Application for Services/Request for Accommodations form and to provide adequate and appropriate documentation of a disability in order to receive academic accommodations.  [A link to the form here].  Documentation must be provided in a timely manner so that accommodations can be in place prior to the initial class meeting.  Documentation should be submitted to Ed Derr, Director of Counseling, Testing, and Disability Support Services, FSC 114, (fax # 417-873-6833).  A copy of the Application for Services/Request for Accommodations and documentation will be securely retained in the student’s file.

Students who have received disability services in high school will find helpful information regarding their rights, responsibilities, and transition from high school to university from the Missouri Association for Higher Education and Disabilities (MO-AHEAD).  Once there, click the link for “The Guidebook.”  There you can find a link to the Table of Contents to help you find more information http://www.moahead.org/  

Also see the links below for more information to assist students’ transition to university:

Do You Suffer from a Temporary Disabling Condition?

In the case of temporary disabling conditions, every effort will be made to provide reasonable accommodation for the duration of any disability.  To insure prompt and appropriate action, the Director of Counseling, Testing, and Disability Support Services should be notified immediately of the arrangements believed to be necessary to accommodate a given temporary condition.

Documentation Requirements

Drury University recognizes the best practices recommended by the national Association on Higher Education and Disability.  We also realize that each individual and each disability is unique.  Specific documentation requirements will vary according to the type of disability, but the following guidelines define acceptable documentation:

  1. Documentation is prepared by a licensed professional who is knowledgeable in the field of the student’s particular disability, and provide a description of the diagnostic methodology and/or a description of the diagnostic criteria, evaluation methods, procedures, tests and dates of administration, as well as a clinical narrative, observation, and specific results.  Where appropriate to the nature of the disability, having both summary data and specific test scores (with the norming population identified) within the report is recommended.

    Learning Disabilities (LD/ADHD):  Students must provide diagnostic test results from a licensed psychologist or certified specialist in learning disabilities.  All te4sting should be based on adult test norms.

    Physical Disabilities:  Students must provide documentation from a physician that specifies the nature of the disability of disabilities.

    Psychiatric Disabilities:  Students must provide documentation from a licensed professional qualified to diagnose and treat psychological disorders.

  2. Documentation is no older than three years.  (Certain long-term medical and health conditions may not be subject to this requirement, Ex. Blindness).  Drury University will evaluate, but may reject, documentation over three years old.  We reserve the right to request updated verification of disability and necessary accommodations.

  3. Documentation includes a statement of diagnosis.

  4. Documentation includes a description of the student’s current functioning and/or the current status of the disability.

  5. Documentation describes how the disability affects the student’s learning/functioning in a post-secondary educational setting.

  6. Documentation includes recommendations for appropriate post-secondary accommodations.

  7. Documentation is dated and signed by the licensed professional and presented on letterhead of the professional.

  8. Documentation should include information regarding medication the student may be using and treatment he/she may be undergoing.  This also should include th3 medication or treatment’s impact on the student’s ability to function in an academic setting. 

Pulling For You!

The Disability Support Services office at Drury University is pleased to serve our students. If you are seeking accommodations for a disability, here are the steps you should follow:

  1.  Complete and submit the Application for Services/Request for Accommodations form.

    This lets us know a little about you, your needs, and how we can serve you.  Download and print the form, complete the requested information, then mail, fax, or scan and email to:

    Ed Derr
    Director of Counseling, Testing, Disability Support Services
    Drury University
    900 North Benton Avenue
    Springfield, Missouri  65802
    Fax: (417) 873-6833
    Email:  ederr@drury.edu
    If you have questions, call:  417-873-7457

    After your Application for Services/Request for Accommodations form is received, it’s desirable that we have an opportunity to talk and discuss the information you supplied.  The conversation allows for both of us to gain clarity of your needs plus simply get to know each other better.  We can meet in person on campus or if you live a distance away from Drury, we can talk on the phone.

  2.  Carefully read our policies and documentation requirements noted above.

  3.  Submit your documentation.  You may need to contact your doctor, psychologist, school counselor, VA counselor, or other qualified medical/educational professional to send your information.  Your information will be handled appropriately to protect your confidentiality.  Please note:  Your submission of the Application for Services/Request for Accommodations begins the process, however no accommodations can be determined or provided until the documentation is received.

  4. Become familiar with the information in the Handbook for Students with Disabilities, so you will know how and when your professors are notified of your accommodations, how accommodations are arranged, and other important aspects of receiving your services.

Documentation Review Process

Once your documentation is received, the Director of Disability Support Services will review it and determine appropriate accommodations.  If your documentation does not satisfy the requirements above, you may be asked to submit updated or more complete information.  Be sure to submit your documents in a timely manner to allow adequate time for the review process before classes begin.

When your request has been reviewed, you will receive notification of the approved accommodations.  If you are a Drury University day student attending classes on the Springfield residential campus, your accommodations will be handled by Ed Derr, Director of Counseling, Testing, and Disability Support Services.  If you attend a Drury night student, attend a Drury Center campus or are a Drury online student, Marti Marlin from the Drury CCPS office will work with you on providing the accommodations.

If you are not satisfied with the accommodations you have been authorized to receive, please call Ed Derr to discuss the situation.  In some cases, we may be able to make adjustments.  In others, additional documentation may be needed.

For more information on filing a grievance, please see the details in the Handbook for Students with Disabilities.

DO NOT ask your professor to provide accommodations if you have not first submitted an Application for Services/Request for Accommodations form and documentation to the Director of Disability Support Services.

Your disability information is CONFIDENTIAL.  We will inform the appropriate faculty or campus personnel of the accommodations you require, but we do not disclose the nature of your disability or diagnosis.  In some cases, you may find that sharing this information with your professors may help them understand you better, but that choices is up to you.

NOTE:  Disability files are updated each year at the beginning of the spring and fall semesters.  If you are not enrolled for the current term, your file will be marked “inactive,” and you will be notified by email.  To reactivate your file and your accommodations, simply notify the Director of Disability Support Services by email when you enroll again. 

Service Animal Policy

General Guidelines

Service animals may accompany students, employees, and visitors with disabilities to Drury University events, activities, and locations with rare exceptions.  Local, state, and federal laws regulate the use of service animals at Drury University.

Definitions:

  1. Service Animal:  According to the U.S. Department of Justice, service animal means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability.  Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals for the purposes of this definition.  The work or tasks performed by a service animal must be directly related to the individual’s disability.  Examples of work or tasks include, but are not limited to, assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision with navigation and other tasks, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing non-violent protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, assisting an individual during a seizure, alerting individuals to the presence of allergens, retrieving items such as medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and helping persons with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors.  The crime deterrent effects of an animal’s presence and the provision of emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship do not constitute work or tasks for the purposes of this definition.

  2. One a case by case basis, Drury University may also permit the use of a housebroken miniature horse by an individual with a disability if the miniature horse has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of the individual with a disability.  Persons wishing the University to consider use of a miniature horse should please contact Ed Derr, Director of Counseling, Testing, and Disability Support Services.

  3. E motional Support Animal:  According to the Fair Housing Act (FHA), Drury will entertain reasonable requests for emotional support animals in campus housing only.

Specific Provisions

  1. Generally, Drury University will permit the use of a service animal by individuals with disabilities.  Drury University may ask an individual with a disability to remove a service animal from the premise if (1) the animal is out of control and the animal’s handler does not take effective action to control it; or (2) the animal is not housebroken.  If a service animal is properly excluded under this provision, the individual with a disability will be given the opportunity to participate in Drury University’s service, program, or activity without having the service animal on the premises.

  2. A service animal may be excluded if Drury University makes an individualized assessment based on reasonable judgment and best available objective evidence that the service animal poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others that cannot be mitigated by reasonable modifications.

  3. A service animal must be immunized against diseases common to that type of animal.

  4. A service animal must be under the control of its handler (e.g., harness, leash, voice control, signals, or other means).

  5. Student is responsible for the care, well-being, and supervision of a service animal at all times.

  6. An entity shall not ask about the nature or extend of a person’s disability, but may make two inquires to determine whether an animal qualifies as a service animal.  An entity may ask if the animal is required because of a disability and what work or task the animal has been trained to perform.  An entity shall not require documentation, such as proof that the animal has been certified, trained, or licensed as a service animal.  Generally, a public entity may not make these inquires about a service animal when it is readily apparent that an animal is trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability (e.g., the dog is observed guiding an individual who is blind or has low vision, pulling a person’s wheelchair, or providing assistance with stability or balance to an individual with an observable mobility disability).

  7. Individuals with disabilities shall be permitted to be accompanied by their service animals in all areas of a public entity’s facilities where members of the public, participants in services, programs or activities, or invitees, as relevant, are allowed to go.

  8. A public entity shall not ask or require an individual with a disability to pay a surcharge, even if people accompanied by pets are required to pay fees, or to comply with other requirements generally not applicable to people without pets.  If a public entity normally charges individuals for the damage they cause, an individual with a disability may be charged for damage caused by his or her service animal.