Contact:
Jana Bufkin
Director of the Masters in Criminology & Criminal Justice
Associate Professor of Criminology
Office: (417) 873-7259
jbufkin@drury.edu

Criminology Course Descriptions

With the exception of the courses CRIM 700/701 (Thesis), required of students completing the M.A. degree, and 702 Comprehensive Examination, all courses carrying graduate credit are numbered in the 600s and are open to students holding the baccalaureate degree and admitted to the graduate criminology/criminal justice program. Courses are grouped in the following areas: core required courses, professional electives and liberal arts electives. Credit cannot be given for courses for which the student is not registered. Credit cannot be claimed more than once for the same course.

CRIM 600: Research Design and Methodology
CRIM 601: Statistical Analysis
CRIM 611: Foundations for Criminological Theory
CRIM 613: Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice
CRIM 615: Police and Society
CRIM 619 Alcohol, Drugs and Crime
CRIM 621: The Correctional System
CRIM 623: Social Justice and Punishment
CRIM 631: Contemporary Criminological Theory
CRIM 634: Deviant Behavior
CRIM 637: Political Economy of Crime and Justice
CRIM 639: Biological Bases of Aggressive Behavior
CRIM 641: Gender, Crime and Justice
CRIM 645: White Collar Crime
CRIM 651: Juvenile Justice
CRIM 652: Managing Terrorism
CRIM 656: Domestic Terrorism
CRIM 661: Seminar in Criminology and Criminal Justice
CRIM 671: Philosophical Issues in Contemporary Society
CRIM 675: Ethics in Criminology and Criminal Justice
CRIM 680 & 681 Internships
CRIM 699: Comprehensive Examination Preparation
CRIM 700 & 701: Thesis
CRIM 702: Comprehensive Examination


CRIM 600: Research Design and Methodology. 3 hours.
This course prepares the student to design, evaluate and report criminological research. Provides students with an understanding of the fundamentals of criminological research with a concentration on quantitative methodologies. Upon completion of the course, students will understand the nature of the research process and will be able to both design their own research project and critically evaluate research in the field.

CRIM 601: Statistical Analysis. 3 hours.
Emphasizing descriptive and inferential statistical methods for the analysis of data and the application of appropriate computer statistical packages, this course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the relationship between research methods and statistical techniques.

CRIM 611: Foundations for Criminological Theory. 3 hours.
Review and assessment of basic theories of crime causation and punishment that arose in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Emphasis is placed on early criminological theories and an evaluation of their contemporary relevance.

CRIM 613: Race, Ethnicity and Social Justice. 3 hours.
Analysis of the involvement of racial minorities in crime and the criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed on critically examining major theories, research and policies as they pertain to group differences in off ending, processing and victimization.

CRIM 615: Police and Society. 3 hours.
This course explores the development and role of police in America. Emphasis is placed on critical issues in policing, especially the patterns of interaction between police and the public.

CRIM 619 Alcohol, Drugs and Crime. 3 hours.
An analysis of the relationship and impact between drugs and alcohol on crime and criminal behavior. The course surveys both historical and contemporary literature examining theory, research, intervention strategies and crime control policies.

CRIM 621: The Correctional System. 3 hours.
Examination of the history, forms and functions of correctional philosophies, institutions, programs and policies. Emphasis is placed on the examination of topics such as the growth of correctional control in modern society (i.e. widening the net), the structure of jails and prisons, intermediate sanctions, community corrections and the death penalty.

CRIM 623: Social Justice and Punishment. 3 hours.
An examination of major moral, legal and ethical issues as they relate to crime and criminal behavior and the theoretical ration-
ales and justifications of punishment are explored. The concept of justice and rule-breaking in America is addressed in detail.

CRIM 631: Contemporary Criminological Theory. 3 hours.
Analyzes sociological theories of crime and deviance and explores social control strategies and policies derived from those theories. This course focuses on critically assessing and applying criminological theories.

CRIM 634: Deviant Behavior. 3 hours.
A course designed to explain nonconformity and the rationales used to justify the control of deviance. Includes consideration of social and psychological factors that contribute to maladaptive behavior.

CRIM 637: Political Economy of Crime and Justice. 3 hours.
This course examines crimes committed against the state and crimes committed by the state. Formal and informal social control responses to these crimes are critically studied and evaluated.

CRIM 639: Biological Bases of Aggressive Behavior. 3 hours.
This course examines theories and contemporary research which focus on the biological bases of aggressive/violent behavior. Emphasis is placed on physiological and genetic factors that interact with the environment to produce behavioral outcomes.

CRIM 641: Gender, Crime and Justice. 3 hours.
This course introduces students to current empirical research and theories on gender, crime and justice issues as they relate to criminology and the justice system. Emphasis is placed on gender differences in crime commission, criminal processing and the
employment of women in justice agencies.

CRIM 645: White Collar Crime. 3 hours.
Organizational and occupational crime are examined; the causes, frequency, legal control and social consequences are emphasized. This course focuses on crimes perpetrated by elite members and organizations of society. Their unethical acts also are explored.

CRIM 651: Juvenile Justice. 3 hours.
An examination of the development of juvenile justice over time and the processes by which certain behaviors are identified as delinquent. Theories of delinquency are examined along with formal societal responses to delinquency and delinquents.

CRIM 652: Managing Terrorism. 3 hours.
This course serves as an introduction to terrorism as a global phenomenon. It will explore and analyze the criminology of terrorism, the origins of modern terrorism, foreign and domestic terrorist groups, traditional and contemporary tactics, and related issues.

CRIM 656: Domestic Terrorism & Hate Crimes. 3 hours.
This course examines organizations that promote bigotry in the U.S. and are often treated as domestic terrorist groups. Those groups will be explored in terms of their history and evolution, ideological beliefs, organizational structure and current activities. Emphasis is placed on laws and legislation, as well as law enforcement, judicial and correctional responses to domestic terrorist threats and hate crimes.

CRIM 661: Seminar in Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 hours.
This course provides the opportunity for intensive analysis of significant recent issues. Topics are announced at the time of offering and the course is repeatable up to 6 credit hours.

CRIM 671: Philosophical Issues in Contemporary Society. 3 hours.
This is a study of the nature of value judgments, the methods of their analysis and verification, and their systematic application in the areas of science, religion, art, morality, education and social policy.

CRIM 675: Ethics in Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 hours.
This course examines the ethical issues as they relate to crime and justice. Includes moral dilemmas and the accompanying legal consequences in conjunction with studying the values associated with social justice and social control.

CRIM 680 and 681 Internships. 3 hours.
These courses are required of students completing the M.S. degree. Students must take both courses.

CRIM 699: Comprehensive Examination Preparation. 1-6 hours.
This course allows for independent student preparation for the comprehensive examinations. Enrollment in this course does not fulfill degree requirements. (S/U grade only).

CRIM 700 & 701: Thesis. 3 hours each.
This course is required of students completing the M.A. degree and is taken over two semesters (S/U grade only).

CRIM 702: Comprehensive Examination. 3 hours.
Students are required to take the comprehensive examination in this course. A required reading list is provided by the instructor each fall and must be completed prior to enrollment.