Global and Transnational Studies

Global and transnational studies offers students the opportunity to enhance their understanding of the world and the most pressing issues it faces. It combines essential global studies courses, a choice of a specialized focus area, intermediate study of foreign language, and study abroad. A minor in global and transnational studies is ideal for students preparing for the broad range of professional careers and graduate programs of study that seek individuals with global proficiency, and for anyone who wishes to be an informed citizen prepared to engage with the challenges and opportunities of the modern world.

The global and transnational studies minor requires a minimum of 24 credit hours.

Global Foundations (3 hrs.)

CORE 201: Global Foundations
3 credit hours

This course introduces students to the study of globalization and its impacts. Emphasis lies on the study of globalization as a concept, as well as the application of this concept to the examination of contemporary issues. Each section draws on the expertise of individual faculty members.

Global Core (6 hrs.) 
Choose two of the following courses:

HIST 108: World History from 1500
3 credit hours

A broad survey of world history from 1500 to the present. Exploration of various modern world cultures with a focus on connections and conflicts between them.

PLSC 152: Introduction to International Relations
3 credit hours

A study of the historical background and contemporary organization of the international political system and the world economy.

SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology
3 credit hours

An analysis of factors that are significant in the development of people as social beings. Consideration is given to the social group and culture as factors in this process.

SOCI 202: Global Social Problems
3 credit hours

This course examines major global social problems and applies the sociological perspectives in understanding the contemporary global social problems such as race and ethnic conflict, war, public health, poverty, population and environmental issues.

Global Focus Area (9 hrs.)
Choose one Global Focus Area and complete three courses within that area.

Focus on Human Rights:

HIST 325: Gender and Culture: East Asia
3 credit hours

This course explores the complex relationships between women and culture in two major civilizations in East Asia: China and Japan.

PLSC 350: International Organizations and Law
3 credit hours

Louis Henkin famously wrote, “...almost all nations observe almost all principles of international law and almost all of their obligations almost all of the time.” This class attempts to demonstrate how the ‘almosts’ in that quote are key to answering the questions, “Does international law matter and what are the real-world impacts of international organizations?”

PLSC 370: Women and Politics
3 credit hours

A comparative study of the role of women as political actors in western and non-western societies. Students will consider the role of gender in shaping political attitudes and perceptions, and the policy issues that affect women in political and daily life.

SOCI 306: Social Movements
3 credit hours

An examination of historical and contemporary collective protest movements that seek change in or preservation of the social and political structure of society. Course will survey theory and research on social change featuring case studies that include the United States labor movement, civil rights, feminism, gay/lesbian rights, environmentalism, animal rights and the new right conservatism movement.

SOCI 341: Homosexuality and Civil Liberties
3 credit hours

Examination of the rise of the gay and lesbian movement and the challenges of achieving civil liberties and civil rights in dominantly heterosexual Western and non-Western societies.

SOCI 347: Medical Sociology
3 credit hours

This course is concerned with the social causes and consequences of health and illness. Major areas of investigation include the social facets of health and disease, the social behavior of healthcare personnel and people who utilize healthcare, and the social functions of health organizations and healthcare delivery systems.

Focus on Power and Poverty:

ECON 335: Poverty and Discrimination
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Admission to Breech School of Business 
Extent of poverty and income inequality in U.S. economy is described. Various theories that attempt to explain causes of poverty and inequality are discussed. Existing antipoverty programs are analyzed as are proposals for policy changes. Students will also complete a relevant research project. This course has been approved as an Honors qualified course.

HIST 258: Revolutions, 1789-1917
3 credit hours

This course examines the history of revolutions. Through the use of the course’s thematic material, students will be introduced to the basic skills used by historians in their investigation of the past, including a close reading and contextualization of primary source texts, the study of historical interpretations and controversies, citation and research methods, effective writing techniques and oral communication skills.

HIST 385: Cold War
3 credit hours

An analysis of specific Cold War controversies, particularly those that took place in the Third World; an examination of ideological, cultural and socio-historical aspects of the Cold War.

PLSC 350: International Organizations and Law
3 credit hours

Louis Henkin famously wrote, “...almost all nations observe almost all principles of international law and almost all of their obligations almost all of the time.” This class attempts to demonstrate how the ‘almosts’ in that quote are key to answering the questions, “Does international law matter and what are the real-world impacts of international organizations?”

SOCI 302: Poverty and Inequality
3 credit hours

This course explores the causes and consequences of institutionalized inequality and how life chances, including life, health and death differ by race, socioeconomic status, and gender. Special emphasis will be given to how these social statuses affect health outcomes in the community.

SOCI 306: Social Movements
3 credit hours

An examination of historical and contemporary collective protest movements that seek change in or preservation of the social and political structure of society. Course will survey theory and research on social change featuring case studies that include the United States labor movement, civil rights, feminism, gay/lesbian rights, environmentalism, animal rights and the new right conservatism movement.

SOCI 325: Political Sociology
3 credit hours

This course is an in-depth study of the social basis of power and politics. Political, economic and cultural forces of conflict and change are examined.

SOCI 347: Medical Sociology
3 credit hours

This course is concerned with the social causes and consequences of health and illness. Major areas of investigation include the social facets of health and disease, the social behavior of healthcare personnel and people who utilize healthcare, and the social functions of health organizations and healthcare delivery systems.

WGST 101: Introduction to Women and Gender Studies
3 credit hours

A multidisciplinary analysis of gender from historical and cross-cultural perspectives. This course examines the relevance and impact of gender-related issues in terms of historical and contemporary culture. The goal of this course is to help students develop a critical framework for thinking about gender and sexuality, with special attention to issues of class, race and ethnicity. Topics include birth control, the social construction of beauty, masculinity and race.

Focus on Human Diversity:

COMM 332: Intercultural Communication
3 credit hours

A survey of critical and qualitative inquiry into intercultural communication. This course provides an introduction to the tenets of intercultural research as well as in-depth analysis of intercultural communication competency and cultural criticism. Topics include introductory readings in ethnography, social anthropology and communication studies, and numerous case studies across various cultures. Theories include nonverbal communication analysis and facework across cultures. Diversity issues and identity politics are explored.

ECON 335: Poverty and Discrimination
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: Admission to Breech School of Business 
Extent of poverty and income inequality in U.S. economy is described. Various theories that attempt to explain causes of poverty and inequality are discussed. Existing antipoverty programs are analyzed as are proposals for policy changes. Students will also complete a relevant research project. This course has been approved as an Honors qualified course.

HIST 212: Food, Culture and Identity in Asia
3 credit hours

Food is a powerful cultural symbol that connects individuals and the community. This course examines the relationship between food and the history of agricultural practices, religion, social structure, rituals, family dynamics and state policies in Asia, particularly China, Japan, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

HIST 321: Women in European History
3 credit hours

Exploration of the lives and voices of European women throughout history and the ideologies that Western society has projected concerning women.

HIST 346: History of Modern China
3 credit hours

An in-depth study of contemporary Chinese culture and history, with an examination of revolutionary movements and modernization.

HIST 347: History of Modern Japan
3 credit hours

An in-depth study of contemporary Japanese history and culture examining the Meiji Restoration, Japanese expansion and interaction in Asia, World War II and the challenges faced by Japan after World War II.

PLSC 312: Islam and the West
3 credit hours

Examination of the historical, cultural, religious, economic and political interactions between the Western and Islamic worlds. Focuses on the place of Muslims in Europe, especially questions the identity and politics. Offered as a study abroad course.

PLSC 360: Islam and Politics in the Modern Middle East
3 credit hours

The study of the historical development of modern political Islam from the nineteenth century to the present. Topics include Islamic sectarianism, religious minorities and the state in the Middle East and debate on the compatibility of Islam and liberal democracy.

PSYC 313: Cross-Cultural Psychology
3 credit hours

Explores the multiple and reciprocal nature of interaction between culture, intra-individual processes (such as perception, cognition, personality) and inter-individual processes (such as communication and group identity). Factors affecting these interactions, like ethnocentrism and prejudice, are also examined.

SOCI 302: Poverty and Inequality
3 credit hours

This course explores the causes and consequences of institutionalized inequality and how life chances, including life, health and death differ by race, socioeconomic status, and gender. Special emphasis will be given to how these social statuses affect health outcomes in the community.

Study Abroad

All students are required to participate in a study abroad program that meets the criteria for Drury’s Engaged Learning requirement. Students who believe that required travel would impose an extreme hardship may apply to substitute a globally relevant Engaged Learning activity, pending approval from the Global and Transnational Studies program director and steering committee.

*Equivalent TOEFL score may be substituted for non-native English speakers.