About the CCPS Bachelor of Science in Human Services

The field of Human Services focuses on meeting the basic needs of our communities, including the health and well-being of individuals and families, assistance with social services, helping with preventing and solving problems, and striving to provide the highest quality of life possible. In the program, students take courses related to counseling, diversity, human development, relationships and group dynamics, and helping people in various capacities.

Although many career paths require advanced training and/or certification, students majoring in Human Services commonly become social workers, mental health counselors, human service assistants, case workers, and public administrators.

View General Education Requirements     View Requirements for Graduation


Students should complete all 100- and 200-level requirements before accumulating 60 credit hours (junior status).

Bachelor of Science in Human Services

The Bachelor of Science in Human Services requires a minimum of 42 credit hours.

PSYC 101: Introduction to Psychology
3 credit hours

This is a survey course providing a study of the behavior of living organisms, particularly human behavior. Typical problems are methods and measurement in psychology, theoretical systems, learning, motivation, perception, personality and psychopathology.

PSYC 230: Lifespan Development
3 credit hours

Study of the major theories of and influences on human development from conception through death, including the biological, cognitive, linguistic, emotional, social and cultural dimensions of development. Special emphasis on change processes.

PSYC 240: Social Psychology
3 credit hours

This course studies the behavior and psychological process of individuals who occupy positions in social structures, organizations, and groups.

PSYC 312: Positive Psychology
3 credit hours

Positive psychology seeks to understand optimal human behavior. It emphasizes a scientific approach to knowing, guiding, healing, educating and helping people to flourish.

PSYC 352: Psychology of Gender
3 credit hours

Psychological study of gender in historical and contemporary perspective. Includes biological, psychological and sociological examination of the role of gender in development, self-concepts, social relations and mental health.

PSYC 367: Family Therapy
3 credit hours

An examination of family relationships, problems and family therapy theories. The course will enhance student understanding of families and the application of therapy and social work intervention to certain situations.

PSYC 370: Human Sexuality
3 credit hours

A study of the anatomy and physiology of the female and male reproductive systems, sexually transmitted diseases, methods of contraception, the sexual response cycle, sexual dysfunctions, gender identity, development of sexual orientation, adult sexuality, the development of relationships, cross-cultural comparison of sexuality and socialization of gender roles.

SOCI 101: Introduction to Sociology
3 credit hours

An analysis of factors that are significant in the development of people as social beings. Consideration is given to the social group and culture as factors in this process.

SOCI 201: Sociology of the Family
3 credit hours

The study of the family as a dynamic social institution. Students will examine family structures and socialization processes within multicultural and socio-historical contexts, including patterns of role behaviors, division of labor, decision- making and the life cycle.

SOCI 246: Introduction to Social Work
3 credit hours

A pre-professional survey of the field of social work including philosophy, major techniques, types, private and public agencies, professional opportunities.

SOCI 327: Social Gerontology
3 credit hours

An examination of the sociological, psychological, environmental, and economic aspects of the aging process both in regard to the individual, as well as the relationship with the larger society. The impact of a larger elderly population and the political relationship that pertains to the services and programs to provide for the needs of the elderly now, as well as in the future, also is considered.

BSCI 200: Research Methods for the Behavioral Sciences
3 credit hours

Prerequisite: PSYC 101SOCI 101, or CRIM 102. 
Considers the major methods of the social sciences, including applied statistics. Topics include: research design, surveys, secondary data and other unobtrusive methods, evaluation research, sampling and research reports.

BSCI 274: Statistical Foundations for Behavioral Sciences
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: CRIM 102PSYC 101, or SOCI 101 and a college-level math course. 
This course provides a general overview of descriptive and inferential statistical techniques behavioral researchers use to analyze data. Topics will include frequency distributions and graphing, measures of central tendency, variation, and relative standing, simple linear regression, and hypothesis testing. Should be taken before a student accumulates 60 credit hours (junior status).

BSCI 493: Senior Seminar
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: senior standing, BSCI 200BSCI 274. Day-BSCI 109, BSCI 200, BSCI 275, BSCI 275-L.
This is the capstone course for the major. Current issues in the field are researched and presented in a seminar setting. Students practice the writing, oral communication and critical thinking skills necessary to succeed in graduate school and their future careers.