CCPS Behavioral Sciences Course Descriptions

100 Level Courses
BSCI 108: Writing in the Behavioral Sciences. 3 hours.

In this writing-intensive course, students will become familiar with how to use electronic databases to locate scholarly, peer-reviewed work and will write a scientific review paper on a topic of interest. Students will also be introduced to the writing style developed by the American Psychological Association.

200 Level Courses
BSCI 200: Research Methods for the Behavioral Sciences. 3 hours.

Prerequisite: PSYC 101SOCI 101, or CRIM 102. 
Considers the major methods of the social sciences, including applied statistics. Topics include: research design, surveys, secondary data and other unobtrusive methods, evaluation research, sampling and research reports.

BSCI 274: Statistical Foundations for Behavioral Sciences. 3 hours.

Prerequisites: CRIM 102PSYC 101, or SOCI 101 and a college-level math course. 
This course provides a general overview of descriptive and inferential statistical techniques behavioral researchers use to analyze data. Topics will include frequency distributions and graphing, measures of central tendency, variation, and relative standing, simple linear regression, and hypothesis testing. Should be taken before a student accumulates 60 credit hours (junior status).

BSCI 290, 390, 490: Selected Topics. 1-3 hours.

Selected Topics are courses of an experimental nature that provide students a wide variety of study opportunities and experiences. Selected Topics offer both the department and the students the opportunity to explore areas of special interest in a structured classroom setting. Selected Topics courses (course numbers 290, 390, 490) will have variable titles and vary in credit from 1-3 semester hours. Selected Topic courses may not be taken as a Directed Study offering.

300 Level Courses
BSCI 349: Behavioral Research. 3 hours.

Prerequisite:, BSCI 200BSCI 274 and three additional hours in the major. 
Students enrolled in this course will complete an original research project from beginning to end, to include writing a literature review, generating hypotheses, devising a research strategy, collecting data, analyzing data and reporting findings in a scientific paper.

BSCI 391, 392, 491, 492: Research. 1-12 hours.

Many academic departments offer special research or investigative projects beyond the regular catalog offering. Significant responsibility lies with the student to work independently to develop a proposal for study that must be approved by a faculty mentor and the appropriate department chair. The faculty member will provide counsel through the study and will evaluate the student’s performance. Sophomores, juniors and seniors are eligible. Students must register for research (291, 292, 391, 392, 491 or 492) to receive credit and are required to fill out a Permission to Register for Special Coursework form. It is recommended that students complete not more than 12 hours of research to apply toward the baccalaureate degree.

BSCI 397, 398, 497, 498: Internship. Varies hours.

Interns must have at least 60 credit hours, completed appropriate coursework and have a minimum GPA of 2.5 prior to registering for academic credit. Also, approval must be obtained from the student's faculty sponsor and required forms must be completed by the deadline. Note: *Architecture, Music Therapy and Education majors do not register internships through Career Planning & Development. These students need to speak with his/her advisor regarding credit requirements and options.

400 Level Courses
BSCI 435: Psychological Tests and Measurements. 3 hours.

Prerequisites: CRIM 102BSCI 274, plus three additional hours in criminology. 
An intensive study of the theory of measurement with emphasis on errors in measurement, validity, reliability, item analysis, test construction and prediction. A laboratory period will include training in the construction taking, scoring and interpretation of psychological tests.

BSCI 493: Senior Seminar. 3 hours.

Prerequisites: senior standing, BSCI 200BSCI 274
This is the capstone course for the major. Current issues in the field are researched and presented in a seminar setting. Students practice the writing, oral communication and critical thinking skills necessary to succeed in graduate school and their future careers.