About the CCPS History Program

History is the study of peoples, societies and events from the earliest times to the present. By studying the past, historians seek to provide meaningful interpretations of the human experience. History is grounded in the examination of primary sources such as documents, wills, poems or artifacts in order to illuminate the past. Studying the traditions, events and decisions of those in the past provides insights for the contemporary world. The history major serves as excellent preparation for careers in education, public policy, consultancy, museum work, law, park service, libraries and business. History majors have attended graduate and professional schools in history, anthropology, museum studies, divinity studies, law and medicine. The analytical thinking and writing skills associated with history provide important professional and civic competencies for practical application in many fields.

The Department of History offers introductory survey courses, research methods seminars and upper level subject studies in American, European, African, Asian and Middle Eastern history. Many of the courses are writing intensive and strive to prepare the history major for professional careers in the field.

The History Program offers two tracks, one for History majors, and the other for students pursuing majors in both History and Secondary Education. Track 1: History, requires a minimum completion of 42 credit hours. Track 2: History-Secondary Education requires a minimum of 42 hours. Do note, Track 2: History-Secondary Education requires the necessary Department of Education courses needed to earn a major in Secondary Education. Please refer to the Secondary Education section of this catalog for specific requirements.

View General Education Requirements     View Requirements for Graduation


The following courses are required for all History majors: 24 hrs.

HIST 259: Engaging the Past
3 credit hours

Through the use of the course's thematic material, students will be introduced to the basic skills used by historians in their investigation of the past, including a close reading and contextualization of primary source texts, the study of historical interpretations and controversies, citation and research methods, effective writing techniques, and oral communication skills.

American History (12 hrs.) 

HIST 101: United States History to 1865
3 credit hours

A broad survey of the major political and social developments from the time of Columbus to the Civil War. Offered fall semester.

HIST 102: United States History, 1865 to Present
3 credit hours

A broad survey of the major political and social developments from the Civil War to the present. Offered spring semester.

HIST 320: The American Revolution
3 credit hours

This course examines the revolutionary origins of America and its transition into a new nation. Topics include the experiences of soldiers, the transformation of politics, and the social revolution that followed war. Changes for Native Americans, African Americans, and women will also be examined as well as the global implications of the Revolution, and its influence on future anti-colonial rebellions.

HIST 330: The American Civil War
3 credit hours

The causes, nature and consequences of the Civil War; emphasis placed on political and social interpretations of the war as well as its military events.

World History (9 hrs.)

HIST 107: World History to 1500
3 credit hours

A survey of world history with a focus on the nature of changes in global frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. It emphasizes relevant factual knowledge, leading interpretive issues, and skills in analyzing types of historical evidence.

HIST 108: World History from 1500
3 credit hours

A broad survey of world history from 1500 to present. Exploration of various modern world cultures with a focus on connections and conflicts between them.

HIST 245: Europe in the Twentieth Century
3 credit hours

A study of major developments in twentieth-century Europe: World War I, the rise of fascism and communism, the Depression, World War II, Cold War, the collapse of communism, contemporary issues; a brief survey of the late 19th-century precursors to these events.

Track 1: History

HIST 219: Early Modern European History
3 credit hours

This course explores European history from the fifth to the seventeenth century. Particular attention is placed on religion, society, culture, and politics.

HIST 343: Latin American History
3 credit hours

This course examines the history of Latin America. Beginning with the indigenous societies of Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean, it follows the growth of colonial societies as indigenous European, and African populations formed new and diverse cultures. Concludes with a history of decolonization and modern Latin American history.

HIST 344: History of Modern Africa
3 credit hours

This course examines the history of Africa since 1700, especially the slave trade, missionary activity and imperialism. Second half of class focuses on the development of nationalist ideologies and independence movements, decolonization, and the formation of independent African states, as well as contemporary crises.

HIST 345: History of Modern Asia
3 credit hours

A survey of Asian developments from human origins to the present, with an emphasis on the events, themes and developments most directly related to the emergence of modern Asia.

HIST 493: Senior Seminar
3 credit hours

Prerequisites: HIST 101HIST 102HIST 107HIST 108HIST 259 and senior status
Serves as a capstone class for graduating history majors and involves completing a major research paper using historical documents. Focus is on research skills, writing and revision, interpreting primary sources and historiography.

Track 2: History - Secondary Education

Completion of Secondary Education Major requirements

HIST 111: Geographical History
3 credit hours

A study of various ways to examine the connection between geography and history-how geography has affected and been shaped by historical developments, including but not limited to physical, political, cultural, and environmental elements. Specific attention will be placed on how the movements of people and human-environmental interactions impact ecosystems and cultures.