About the CCPS Associate of Science in Pre-Ministerial Studies

The Associate of Science in Pre-Ministerial Studies degree is designed to prepare the student for entry into a Bachelor’s degree, seminary, or for lay work in religious organizations. It provides an introduction for an ecumenical religious education, and ethically informed approach to local, regional, and global inequities; and strategies for leadership in religious organizations.

View General Education Requirements     View Requirements for Graduation


Associate of Science in Pre-Ministerial Studies

The Associate of Science in Pre-Ministerial Studies requires a minimum of 21 credit hours.

LDST 275: Leading Religious, Charitable and Professional Organizations
3 credit hours

Significant opportunities exist for leaders in the nonprofit community, including religious, charitable and professional organizations. Making students aware of these possibilities and the differences/similarities of these agencies to the for-profit world are the primary purposes of this course. Understanding the basics of nonprofit leadership will help students in the Leadership Studies degree programs be well-rounded and equipped to apply their skills in the nonprofit area. Students may choose among three "tracks" of emphasis during the course: religious organizations, charities, and professional associations. Specialization will be achieved through use of a "core" text and a supplemental text for the track chosen.

PHIL 100: Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking
3 credit hours

This course helps students learn to think clearly, concisely and analytically, through a familiarity with the reasoning methods of logic in terms of learning how to define terms, formulate arguments, and analyze statements critically and objectively. The course deals with the language of logic and the methods of deductive and inductive reasoning.

PHIL 210: Ethics
3 credit hours

Ethics is a writing-intensive course that uses both formal and informal writing as the primary medium in which students explore, reflect and draw conclusions regarding values questions. Some of the topics that will be covered in the course are relativism, subjectivism, religion and morality, environmental ethics, issues in business and medical ethics, utilitarianism and consequentialism, Kantian moral theory and issues in political theory.

RELG 203: Introduction to the Bible
3 credit hours

An introductory study of the Hebrew scriptures and the Christian New Testament with attention to the literature of these sacred texts, the historical circumstances of their development and the methods of textual interpretation.

Choose One: 3 hrs.

RELG 109: Introduction to the Study of Religion
3 credit hours

Religion and religious ideas are central to all cultures and societies, including our own. This course will look at the broad range of cultural forms we have come to call religion, examine how these forms shape cultures and societies, and finally, by examining what these forms have in common and how they differ, we will determine what it is we study when we study religion.

PHIL 201: Introduction to Philosophy
3 credit hours

A comparative and critical study of the major philosophic positions with a view to developing the analytic, synthetic and speculative dimensions of philosophical methods.

Choose One: 3 hrs.

RELG 202: Religions of the World: Middle Eastern
3 credit hours

A comparative study of the major ideas of those religions most directly related to and influencing the West: Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity.

RELG 206: Eastern Religions and Philosophies
3 credit hours

An introduction to Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism and Taoism. Specifically, the course focuses on the systems of value that emerge from these traditions, and where appropriate, compares and contrasts them with the value systems of Western traditions. The conceptual framework guiding this examination incorporates the tradition’s overall world view, conception of God or ultimate reality, its understanding of the origin, nature and destiny of the cosmos and of human beings, diagnosis of the human condition and prescription for attaining the ultimate goal or purpose of human life.

RELG 283: Hispanic Religious Traditions in the U.S.
3 credit hours

This course is primarily a survey of the roles and functions of various forms of these religious traditions in the diverse communities of Hispanic peoples in North America. We will look at the various forms of these religious traditions in North America and the United States and how they have influenced culture both in the Hispanic community and society as a whole. In addition to looking at how Hispanic religious traditions influence Christian theology and forms of worship, we will also observe the intersection of life, economics, politics, etc. with religion through readings, discussions, films, music, and, if time allows, visits to local churches and/or relevant nonprofit agencies.

Choose One: 3 hrs.

RELG 205: The Life and Teachings of Jesus
3 credit hours

A study of the person, work and teaching of Jesus as reflected in the Biblical records with some attention given to later and current interpretations of His life.

RELG 208: Life and Teachings of Paul
3 credit hours

An in depth study of the history, themes, and theologies developed by Paul in his letters, and by the Early Churches as they engaged with his writings.

RELG 270: Who is Jesus?
3 credit hours

This course is devoted to understanding the multi-faceted historic and contemporary conversations about the identity, nature and influence of Jesus of Nazareth. It is divided into four sections. In the first, differing images of Jesus from the New Testament are examined. In the second, attention is given to the diverse theological understandings of Jesus throughout history. Part three examines currents in thought about Jesus from the contemporary period. Part four gives students the opportunity to share own research and findings into the question of Jesus’ identity.

RELG 275: Does God Exist?
3 credit hours

This course is designed to help students explore the question of divinity from a theological, philosophical and historical perspective. Students are introduced to the arguments for the existence of God as well as the arguments — both historic and contemporary — for atheism and agnosticism. Attention is given to images of God from historic religious traditions such as Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Some focus is also directed to the Eastern interpretations. The course gives special attention toward the close to contemporary reinterpretations of God language. Finally, all students are given the opportunity to chart their own journey through this material in a closing intellectual biography.