Hammons School of Architecture

Architecture Course Descriptions

Master of Architecture Program

100 Level Courses:
ARCH 110: Introduction to Architecture
ARCH 112: Architectural Design II: Proportion, Scale and Space
ARCH 124: Architectural Representation
ARCH 153: Why Buildings Matter
ARCH 154: Why Cities Matter

200 Level Courses:
ARCH 213: Architectural Design III: Concept, Environment and Site
ARCH 214: Architectural Design IV: Human Needs and Activities
ARCH 225: Introduction to Computers in Architecture
ARCH 233: Introduction to Building Systems
ARCH 234: Structures I
ARCH 251: History of Architecture, Urbanism and Art I
ARCH 252: History of Architecture, Urbanism and Art II
ARCH 253: Theories of Architecture

300 Level Courses:
ARCH 315: Architectural Design V: Synthesis
ARCH 334: Structures II
ARCH 335: Environmental Systems I
ARCH 356: History of Modern Architecture
ARCH 373: Design/Build Special Project
ARCH 375: BIM and Advanced Computer Modeling

400 Level Courses:
ARCH 417: Architectural Design VI: Community Studies
ARCH 418: Architectural Design VII: Urban Context
ARCH 426: Travel Journal: Mediterranean Cultures
ARCH 427: Professional Communication
ARCH 428: Journaling: Urban Form in the Global Context
ARCH 456: Culture and Place: The Greek Legacy
ARCH 458: Culture and Place: The Theoretical and Historical Context
ARCH 461: Architecture Internship
ARCH 467: Facility Programming
ARCH 291, 292, 391, 392, 491, 492 Research

Master of Architecture Courses
500 Level Courses:

MARC 519: Architectural Design VII: Comprehensive Studio
MARC 520: Architectural Design IX: Exploration
MARC 521: Architectural Design X: Thesis
MARC 530 and 531: Architecture Topics: Technology and Sustainability
MARC 538: Environmental Systems II
MARC 539: Structures III
MARC 550 and 551: Architecture Topics: Design Theory and History
MARC 557: Architecture Senior Seminar
MARC 569: Professional Practice
MARC 570 and 571: Architecture Topics: Urban and Regional Studies
MARC 590: Selected Topics
MARC 591, 592: Research


ARCH 110: Introduction to Architecture. 3 hours.

This course offers an introduction to architecture through topics including design, digital and/or hand drafting, architectural history, and the role of architecture in culture. Offered through dual credit agreements at selected high schools.

ARCH 112: Architectural Design II: Proportion, Scale and Space. 5 hours.

Prerequisite:  ARTZ 111. Co-requisite:  ARCH 124.
This studio explores and develops conceptual strategies for basic formal and spatial design, emphasizing the role of ordering principles and of fundamental architectonic elements in the implementation of design intentions. Students also will be introduced to foundational processes for developing design projects through the application of formal analytical vocabulary, diagramming, drawing methods and conventions, and three-dimensional modeling. Offered spring semester.  Course fee required.

ARCH 124: Architectural Representation. 2 hours.

Prerequisite:  ARTZ 111. Co-requisite:  ARCH 112.
This course is structured to develop an understanding and ability to use representational media to visualize,  document, investigate and present intentions within the graphic language of architectural communication. A range of integrative 2-D and 3-D techniques used to delineate architectural information will be explored. These skills will facilitate recording of key experiences, exploration of various design alternatives, refinement of designs, achievement of precision and accuracy, searching visual memory and the communication of intentions to others. Offered spring semester.

ARCH 153 Why Buildings Matter. 3 hours.

We encounter architecture every day, and yet few of us understand how it affects us emotionally, physically or intellectually. This course is designed to help non-majors interpret their experiences of the built environment by introducing them to architectural principles that influence constructed artifacts that shape and are shaped by their cultural contexts. Students will examine built works ranging from the everyday to the monumental and from the rural to the urban in order to appreciate architecture's meanings and value across time.

ARCH 154 Why Cities Matter. 3 hours.

Soon, nearly two-thirds of the world’s population will live in cities.   Yet rarely do we pause to consider the meaning and significance of these places as complex products of human ingenuity.  This course is designed to help non-majors understand cities both as three-dimensional artifacts and as settings for social and cultural innovation.  Special emphasis will be placed on how cities and urban experiences have been interpreted in art, literature, and film.

ARCH 213: Architectural Design III: Concept, Environment and Site. 5 hours.

Prerequisite: ARCH 112, ARCH 124.  Co-requisite: ARCH 233
This studio focuses on conceptualization and implementation of architectural ideas in response to environment, landscape, site and enclosure. Emphasis will be placed on understandings of building as shelter, mediating between humans and their external world. Students will continue to develop the foundational design processes introduced in previous studios, and will be introduced to the role of rigorous precedent analysis in the generation of architectural ideas. Offered fall semester.  Course fee required.

ARCH 214: Architectural Design IV: Human Needs and Activities. 5 hours.

Prerequisite: ARCH 213, ARCH 233. Co-requisite: ARCH 225.
This studio focuses on conceptualization and implementation of architectural ideas in response to human experience, human needs and human diversity. Emphasis will be placed on architectural design as an interpretation and accommodation of various human activities through the exploration of program, perception, scale and proportion, and safety and accessibility requirements. Students will continue to develop the design processes introduced in previous studios.  Offered spring semester. Course fee required.

ARCH 225: Introduction to Computers in Architecture. 3 hours.

Prerequisite:  ARCH 124. Co-requisite:  ARCH 214.
This course builds on principles taught in ARCH 124, focusing on digital skills and processes that enhance communication techniques. A range of integrative representation techniques and principles will be explored through a variety of 2-D and 3-D software programs. Offered spring semester.

ARCH 233: Introduction to Building Systems. 3 hours.

Co-requisite:  ARCH 213.
Introduction of basic design and building principles; human comfort, structure, life safety and enclosure systems. This course will emphasize the development of basic introductory knowledge for an application in the design process. Offered fall semester.

ARCH 234: Structures I. 3 hours.

Prerequisite:  MATH 211, PHYS 201, ARCH 233.
Investigation of the basic principles of structural systems through the analysis of overall structural behavior with specific attention to statics and system modeling. Offered spring semester.

ARCH 251: History of Architecture, Urbanism and Art 1. 3 hours.

Formal, theoretical, material, pragmatic and conceptual aspects of architecture, cities and art, examined in relation to their cultural contexts, from pre-history to circa 1400. Offered fall semester.

ARCH 252: History of Architecture, Urbanism and Art II. 3 hours.

Formal, theoretical, material, pragmatic and conceptual aspects of architecture, cities and art, examined in relation to their cultural contexts, from circa 1400 to the present. Offered spring semester. 

ARCH 253: Theories of Architecture. 3 hours.

Prerequisite:  ARCH 251, ARCH 252, ARCH 356, and admission to the Architecture Professional Program. 
An introduction to the range of theoretical issues and approaches through which architecture has been and can be conceptualized, designed, produced, explained and assessed.  This is a writing intensive course, emphasizing writing process, critique, and revision, and employing writing to make clear arguments and to articulate positions relevant to the discipline of architecture. Students are expected to develop their abilities to understand, discuss and write about architectural issues in a clear, rigorous way.

ARCH 315: Architectural Design V: Synthesis. 5 hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Architecture Professional Program.
This studio draws upon the four previous courses in studio sequence, emphasizing architectural design synthesis. Students will develop and demonstrate their abilities to conceptualize and implement building designs that bring together basic design principles, program, structural and envelope systems, climate response, and egress.  Offered fall semester. Course fee required.

ARCH 334: Structures II. 3 hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Architecture Professional Program.
This course deals with the design and analysis of beams and columns for timber, structural steel, and reinforced concrete materials, and using current stress and strength design philosophies. The course will also introduce the design of reinforced-concrete foundations. Offered fall semester.

ARCH 335: Environmental Systems I. 3 hours.

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Architecture Professional Program.
This course deals with those building elements that pertain to the visual and aural conditioning for the purposes of human use and comfort. The basic principles of light (natural and electrical) and acoustical systems, their integration with other building systems and the impact on the aesthetics of design will be stressed. Plumbing and electrical systems also will be presented. Offered fall semester.

ARCH 356: History of Modern Architecture. 3 hours.

Prerequisite:  ARCH 251, ARCH 252. 
An introduction to the history of modern architecture from its intellectual and artistic origins in the nineteenth century through the present day.  Special emphasis is placed on the consideration of modernism in architecture not just as a narrowly defined stylistic movement, but also as a broader cultural phenomenon through which architects engage a changing world.

ARCH 373: Design/Build Special Project. 3 hours.

Students will work with a client to design and construct a full scale project during the course of the semester. This class takes a hands-on approach to exploration of materials, tectonics and construction methods.

ARCH 375: BIM and Advanced Computer Modeling. 3 hours.

This course is an in-depth study of digital content creation in architecture. The class will focus on the tools and techniques to create a computer generated building model, and applied tools for working with the computer model exploring output, simulation and animation. Students will develop techniques looking at both realistic and schematic representation, and the integration of building information modeling as a tool to inform and enhance the design process.

ARCH 417: Architectural Design VI: Community Studies. 5 hours.

Prerequisite: ARCH 315
This studio promotes the critical, creative and innovative exploration of environmental, human and tectonic factors associated with ‘real world,’ funded, community-based architectural and urban design problems.  All projects are student developed and managed under the supervision of the Director of the Center for Community Studies. Particular emphasis shall be placed upon the development of interdisciplinary and participatory investigations of regional community problems. Course fee required.

ARCH 418: Architectural Design VII: Urban Context. 5 hours.

Prerequisite: ARCH 315.
This studio emphasizes the role of architectural design in structuring urban sites with complex formal, historical, and cultural contexts.  Study-abroad coursework, whether through the Drury University Center in Greece or through alternative short-term study-abroad programs, or field analyses during field trips across the US will constitute the basis of urban studies and architectural design projects within urban contexts.

ARCH 426: Travel Journal: Mediterranean Cultures. 3 hours.

Co-requisite:  ARCH 418, ARCH 456.
Students will apply cultural theories from CORE 201 Global Foundations to disciplined observation of the diversity of practices, rituals, habits and artistic productions of the peoples of the Mediterranean as the crossroads between Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Offered only with the Drury international semester program in Greece.

ARCH 427: Professional Communication. 3 hours.

Prerequisite: ARCH 233, ARCH 315.
An in-depth exploration and development of oral, written and graphic communication techniques and skills in professional architecture practice.  This course examines communication between the architect and public, architect and client, architect and contractor and architect and regulator, with emphasis on technical communication methods.

ARCH 428: Journaling: Urban Form in the Global Context. 3 hours.

Co-requisite:  ARCH 458.
This internationally based course will examine formal and spatial characteristics of significant urban places and the buildings and landscape that comprise them. Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of the interplay between urban design, planning, architecture and landscape in specific international contexts. Students will use journals and drawings in order to document, analyze and synthesize their observations and insights in a disciplined and diverse manner. Offered summer semester.

ARCH 456: Culture and Place: The Greek Legacy. 3 hours.

Co-requisite:  ARCH 418, ARCH 426.
This course examines Greece as a place of major significance in the consciousness of Western Civilization and the social cultural forces that have shaped its artistic, intellectual and spiritual traditions in the ancient, medieval and modern eras. Offered only with the Drury international semester program in Greece.

ARCH 458: Culture and Place: The Theoretical and Historical Context. 3 hours.

Co-requisite: ARCH 428.  
This course examines international places in connection with significant social and cultural forces that represent a major idea or event in a foreign culture or cultures, and that have and continue to shape the artistic, intellectual and spiritual traditions of that culture or cultures. Particular emphasis will be given to systematic and disciplined methods of analysis that connect the contemporary built environment to broader theoretical and historical contexts. Offered summer semester.

ARCH 461: Architecture Internship. 0 hour.

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Architecture Professional Program.  
A 10-week, full-time summer work experience under the direct supervision of a registered architect or 360 hours of accumulated professional office experience or 360 hours of approved alternate experiences. Students must document the experience by either establishing an Internship Development Program (IDP) record or by submitting a portfolio with letters of recommendation from the supervising architect to the instructor of record. The School of Architecture will assist students in their search for appropriate internship experiences; however, it is the students' responsibility to secure employment. The School of Architecture does not place students in internship situations. S/U grading.

ARCH 467: Facility Programming. 3 hours.

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Architecture Professional Program.
Lectures concerned with methods and techniques for systematic problem-solving and program development. Topics covered may range from project planning, problem awareness, identification of user need, decision theory, decision evaluation, budgeting or resources, communication and quality control. 

ARCH 291, 292, 391, 392, 491, 492 Research.

MARC 519: Architectural Design VIII: Comprehensive Studio. 5 hours.

Prerequisite: ARCH 417
This master level course is an advanced design studio that assumes a high level of proficiency in design process and representation, as well as in other content areas developed in the pre-professional program. This studio focuses on the conceptualization and implementation of comprehensive architectural design. Students will be expected to draw upon all previous coursework in order to thoroughly develop a project from a detailed program. Emphasis will be placed on the elaboration of architectural ideas through integration and syntheses of structural, environmental, envelope, building assemblies, life-safety systems and the principles of sustainability. Offered spring semester.  Course fee required.

MARC 520 Architectural Design IX: Exploration. 5 hours.

Prerequisite: MARC 519, completion of the 360 hour internship.
This master level course is an advanced design studio that assumes a high level of proficiency in design process and representation, as well as in other content areas developed in the pre-professional program. Students will be expected to approach advanced design problems by applying skills and content developed in previous studios, as well as in advanced seminar and research courses. Students will choose from a range of faculty-selected topics. Offered fall semester.  Course fee required.

MARC 521 Architectural Design X: Thesis. 5 hours.

Prerequisite: MARC 520, MARC 557. Co-requisite: MARC 569.
This master level course is an advanced design studio that assumes a high level of proficiency in design process and representation, as well as in other content areas developed in the pre-professional program. Students will be expected to approach advanced design problems by applying skills and content developed in previous studios, as well as in advanced seminar and research courses. This studio is the capstone of the studio sequence, providing a setting for the exploration and synthesis of specific in-depth topics of personal and professional importance to the individual student that were developed in the MARC 557 Architecture Senior Seminar course. Offered spring semester.  Course fee required.

MARC 530 and 531: Architecture Topics: Technology and Sustainability. 3 hours each.

Prerequisite: Admission to the M.Arch. Program.
This master level course is an advanced seminar providing an in-depth examination of issues related to technology and/or sustainability in architecture.  Specific course content will vary and will be defined by individual instructors.  Topics, content and methods will support the acquisition of knowledge and abilities within the general topic area, as well as the application of these to other coursework including the MARC 521 Thesis Studio.  Students will be expected to develop and apply advanced analysis, research and communication skills. 

MARC 538: Environmental Systems II. 3 hours.

Prerequisite: ARCH 335, ARCH 338.
This course deals with building elements that pertain to thermal conditioning for the purposes of human use and comfort. The basic principles of thermal (natural and mechanical) control systems, their integration with other building systems and their impact on the process of design will be stressed. Fire safety and suppression systems also will be covered. Offered spring semester. 

MARC 539 Structures III. 3 hours.

Prerequisite: ARCH 334.
Application of engineering principles and analytical methods, as presented in the earlier structures coursework, to a multi-story architectural solution. Students will develop a holistic structural design response that withstands both gravity and lateral forces. The structural design will be refined by applying the principles of rigid-body statics and deformable body mechanics to the individual structural elements. Offered spring semester.  

MARC 550 and 551: Architecture Topics: Design Theory and History. 3 hours each.

Prerequisite: Admission to the M.Arch. Program.
This master level course is an advanced seminar providing an in-depth examination of issues related to design theory and history in architecture.  Specific course content will vary and will be defined by individual instructors.  Topics, content and methods will support the acquisition of knowledge and abilities within the general topic area, as well as the application of these to other coursework including the MARC 521 Thesis Studio. Students will be expected to develop and apply advanced analysis, research and communication skills.  

MARC 557: Architecture Senior Seminar. 3 hours.

Prerequisite: MARC 519.
This master level course is an advanced seminar in architecture.  Students will be expected to develop and apply advanced analysis, research and communication skills in order to identify a research topic of relevance to their own interest and professional goals. The research topic will also connect these specific and personal interests with students’ wider educational experience in the Drury CORE curriculum. Topics developed in this course will be explored and extended through the MARC 521 Architectural Design X: Thesis. Offered fall semester.

MARC 569: Professional Practice. 3 hours.

Prerequisite: MARC 519. Co-requisite: MARC 521.
This master level course is an advanced seminar that addresses laws and regulations, project process and economics, business practices and management, and ethical concerns.  Students will critically explore the relationship between personal and professional goals and the context of architectural practices. Offered spring semester.

MARC 570 and 571: Architecture Topics: Urban and Regional Studies. 3 hours each.

Prerequisite: Admission to the M.Arch. Program.
This master level course is an advanced seminar providing an in-depth examination of issues related to urban and regional studies in architecture.  Specific course content will vary and will be defined by individual instructors.  Topics, content and methods will support the acquisition of knowledge and abilities within the general topic area, as well as the application of these to other coursework including the MARC 521 Thesis Studio.  Students will be expected to develop and apply advanced analysis, research and communication skills.

MARC 590: Selected Topics. 1-3 hours.

MARC 591, 592: Research.

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